T Nation

Muslims Denouncing Terrorism

Well, here you go. For all you that think that Islam is akin to murder. I think it’s clear that there might, might be some who actually care about America.

U.S. Muslims Warn of Threat From Within
By RACHEL ZOLL
AP Religion Writer

After the Sept. 11 suicide hijackings, distraught U.S. Muslim leaders feared the next casualty would be their religion.
Islam teaches peace, they told anyone who would listen in news conferences, at interfaith services and, most famously, standing in a mosque with President Bush.

But five years later, the target audience for their pleas has shifted. Now the faith’s American leaders are starting to warn fellow Muslims about a threat from within.

The 2005 subway attacks in London that investigators say were committed by British-born and -raised Muslims, and the relentless Muslim-engineered sectarian assaults on Iraqi civilians, are among the events that have convinced some U.S. Muslims to change focus.

“This sentiment of denial, that sort of came as a fever to the Muslim community after 9-11, is fading away,” said Muqtedar Khan, a political scientist at the University of Delaware and author of “American Muslims.” “They realize that there are Muslims who use terrorism, and the community is beginning to stand up to this.”

Muslim leaders point to two stark examples of the new mind-set:

_A Canadian-born Muslim man worked with police for months investigating a group of Islamic men and youths accused in June of plotting terrorist attacks in Ontario. Mubin Shaikh said he feared any violence would ultimately hurt Islam and Canadian Muslims.

_In England, it’s been widely reported that a tip from a British Muslim helped lead investigators to uncover what they said was a plan by homegrown extremists to use liquid explosives to destroy U.S.-bound planes.

Cooperation isn’t emotionally easy, as Western governments enact security policies that critics say have criminalized Islam itself.

Safiyyah Ally, a graduate student in political science at the University of Toronto, wrote recently on altmuslim.com that Shaikh, the Canadian informer, went too far.

She said the North American Muslim community “is fragile enough as is” without members “spying” on each other. Leaders should counsel Muslims against violence and report suspicious activity to police - but nothing more, she argued.

“We cannot have communities wherein individuals are paranoid of each other and turned against one another,” Ally wrote.

Yet some leaders say keeping watch for extremists protects all Muslims and their civil rights.

Salam al-Marayati, executive director of Muslim Public Affairs Council, an advocacy group based in Los Angeles, says working closely with authorities underscores that Muslims are not outsiders to be feared. It also gives Muslims a way to directly air their concerns about how they’re treated by the government.

“We’re not on opposite teams,” al-Marayati said. “We’re all trying to protect our country from another terrorist attack.”

In 2004, his group started the “National Anti-Terrorism Campaign,” urging Muslims to monitor their own communities, speak out more boldly against violence and work with law enforcement. Hundreds of U.S. mosques have signed on, al-Marayati said.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations, a civil rights group, ran a TV ad campaign and a petition-drive called “Not in the Name of Islam,” which repudiates terrorism. Hundreds of thousands of people have endorsed it, according to Ibrahim Hooper, the group’s spokesman.

After the London subway bombings, the Fiqh Council of North America, which advises Muslims on Islamic law, issued a fatwa - or edict - declaring that nothing in Islam justifies terrorism. The council said Muslims were obligated to help law enforcement protect civilians from attacks.

“I think everyone now agrees that silence isn’t an option,” Hooper said. “You have to speak out in defense of civil liberties, but you also have to speak out against any kind of extremism or violence that’s carried out in the name of Islam.”

But many Muslims say they’re being asked to look out for something that even the U.S. government struggles to define: What constitutes an imminent threat?

Khan said he has heard of cases in American mosques where imams have expressed extreme views in sermons and worshippers have confronted the prayer leaders about it.

“But beyond that what else can we do?” Khan said. “Do we need to hire a private detective to put on this guy? If five guys came to me and said, `Muqtedar, let’s get together. Let’s blow up this and that,’ then I would call the police. But the community does not understand surveillance.”

Imam Muhammad Musri, head of the Islamic Society of Central Florida, said he has tried to address this problem in the eight mosques he oversees in the Orlando area.

He regularly invites law enforcement officials to speak with local Muslims and encourages mosque members to come to him with any suspicions, even if they overhear something said in jest. Musri says he also speaks regularly with local FBI and police to establish a relationship in case a real threat emerges.

“Here in Central Florida, talking to most people, they are literally upset by the actions of Muslims - or so-called Muslims - overseas in Europe and the Middle East, because they say, `We wish they would come and see how we’re doing here,’” Musri said. “We know who the real enemy is - someone who might come from the outside and try to infiltrate us. Everybody is on the lookout.”


Wrong! All muslims are terrorists, and hate America because they’re jealous. Anyone who doesn’t realize this is out of touch with reality, anti-american, gay, a communist, and quite possibly a witch. That article was written by Osama and published by the Devil.

[quote]Bullmoose wrote:
Wrong! All muslims are terrorists, and hate America because they’re jealous. Anyone who doesn’t realize this is out of touch with reality, anti-american, gay, a communist, and quite possibly a witch. That article was written by Osama and published by the Devil.[/quote]

LOL.

I’m bumping this because of how much talk there is about how Muslims don’t condemn terrorism.

Here it is fellas. Disputes? If not, then I don’t want to hear about it anymore.

I think the problem is not so much American Muslims, which is a mixed bag of both support and dissent. The greater criticism is of the Muslim world generally refusing to denounce Islamism.

American Muslims can shriek to the heavens that they denounce Islamism’s attitudes and actions - that will do nothing but label them as polluters of Islamic truth by the Islamists and therefore make them targets.

What is needed is the condemnation by Muslim states and societies, which is where the Islamism foments.

American Muslims helping out in the GWOT is fantastic - they have much to protect as well. But what we need are the non-Western Muslim societies to finally say “no more”. Will they?

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
I’m bumping this because of how much talk there is about how Muslims don’t condemn terrorism.

Here it is fellas. Disputes? If not, then I don’t want to hear about it anymore.[/quote]

I think this is a good start, but we will have to see much more of it to know if it is just a PR stunt or a system-wide approach.

[quote]thunderbolt23 wrote:
I think the problem is not so much American Muslims, which is a mixed bag of both support and dissent. The greater criticism is of the Muslim world generally refusing to denounce Islamism.
[/quote]
It would seem likely to me that Islamism would not in all cases imply terrorism. Any given individual Islamist might conceivably believe any one of the following ‘A’ or ‘B’ or ‘C’ or ‘D’ or ‘E’.

A) The ideal government is based on Islamic law, but existing non-Islamic governments that tolerate Islam should not be overthrown by force. Secular government is a civic compromise within which Muslims should work for Islamic values to the extent that their duties and oaths of office allow it.

B) The ideal government is based on Islamic law, but existing non-Islamic governments that tolerate Islam should only be overthrown by force in special cases (e.g. Israel). The force used should never include terrorism.

C) The ideal government is based on Islamic law. Any non-Islamic government should be overthrown by force when the time is right if that is the only way to get rid of it. But the force used should never include terrorism.

D) Terrorism should be used in special cases to overthrow or oppose non-Islamic governments (Israel, or the USA as long as its troops are on “Muslim soil”). But in other cases, terrorism should not be used to overthrow or oppose non-Islamic governments.

E) All means should be used to impose Islamic rule in any and all places when the time is right, including terrorism.

Myself, I oppose all five ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’, and ‘E’.

But I might feel uneasy if I saw the entire Muslim world denounce the ‘A’ form of Islamism while still claiming to be Muslim; because that would mean another billion people under the spell of masonic ideas.

We need to see thousands of Muslims marching in the streets denouncing terrorism.

I don’t think the beef is with all muslims. It is the radical islamic fundies that are the problem. They are the cowards.

I can sit here and denounce the bombing of abortion clinics all day - as would many of my friends - but that does not remove the black eye given to evnagelical christians because of a few whacked out fundies.

Can you see the parallel?

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
I’m bumping this because of how much talk there is about how Muslims don’t condemn terrorism.

Here it is fellas. Disputes? If not, then I don’t want to hear about it anymore.[/quote]

They didn’t seem to be condeming terrorism when they were dancing in the streets after the planes hit the towers.

That sort of stuff paints Muslims in a very bad light IMHO. As I’ve said before; perception is, unfortunately, reality.

[quote]bigflamer wrote:
FightinIrish26 wrote:
I’m bumping this because of how much talk there is about how Muslims don’t condemn terrorism.

Here it is fellas. Disputes? If not, then I don’t want to hear about it anymore.

They didn’t seem to be condeming terrorism when they were dancing in the streets after the planes hit the towers.

That sort of stuff paints Muslims in a very bad light IMHO. As I’ve said before; perception is, unfortunately, reality.

[/quote]

Yeah I remember seeing people in Afganistan dancing around a few days after 9/11 talking about how they are killing the Great Satan…It’s not really helping people’s view of Islam in the west. It boggles my mind why we don’t see Muslim’s living in North America and Western Europe having marches condemning terrorism and staging other anti-terrorist demonstartions.

IMO the Muslim community is really bringing this negative image on themselves by not being more vocal if they really do oppose these types of acts.

[quote]bigflamer wrote:
FightinIrish26 wrote:
I’m bumping this because of how much talk there is about how Muslims don’t condemn terrorism.

Here it is fellas. Disputes? If not, then I don’t want to hear about it anymore.

They didn’t seem to be condeming terrorism when they were dancing in the streets after the planes hit the towers.

That sort of stuff paints Muslims in a very bad light IMHO. As I’ve said before; perception is, unfortunately, reality.

[/quote]

well I guess if you’re going to tar an entire religion based on the actions of a few then pretty much everybodies fucked aren’t they?

[quote]JaysonVirissimo wrote:
bigflamer wrote:
FightinIrish26 wrote:
I’m bumping this because of how much talk there is about how Muslims don’t condemn terrorism.

Here it is fellas. Disputes? If not, then I don’t want to hear about it anymore.

They didn’t seem to be condeming terrorism when they were dancing in the streets after the planes hit the towers.

That sort of stuff paints Muslims in a very bad light IMHO. As I’ve said before; perception is, unfortunately, reality.

Yeah I remember seeing people in Afganistan dancing around a few days after 9/11 talking about how they are killing the Great Satan…It’s not really helping people’s view of Islam in the west. It boggles my mind why we don’t see Muslim’s living in North America and Western Europre having marches condemning terrorism and staging other anti-terrorist demonstartions. IMO the Muslim community is really bringing this negative image on themselves by not being more vocal if they really do oppose these types of acts.[/quote]

I would say that the celebrating had fuck all to do with Islam, and everything to do with a down-trodden nation thinking ‘one of their own’ had got one over on the big guy. The images you refer to were also taken immediately as the news broke - I watched an interview, (may try and dig it up if I have time) with someone who joined in the celebrating who said he later felt ashamed, as he hadn’t stopped to consider the human cost - he was ‘merely’ cheering the symbolism of the attack.

I know this may not cut any ice with you, but be honest - when the pictures of the initial raids on either Iraq or Afghanistan were beamed onto our TV sets, did you not think: “yes, have some of that!”. When shit like this happens thousands of miles away it is easy to forget that real, human lives are being torn apart by the quarrels of our respective leaders.

[quote]juninho wrote:
I would say that the celebrating had fuck all to do with Islam, and everything to do with a down-trodden nation thinking ‘one of their own’ had got one over on the big guy.

[/quote]

A bit like the last scene in Star Wars when the Death Star explodes. I’m sure the Rebels didn’t pause to consider the human cost of destroying a battle station the size of a small moon. Their wild jubilation was over the destruction of a deadly symbol of the power projected by the hated Empire.

Back to the Muslims vs. the West, this is a game which has been going on for a thousand years, and their side hadn’t scored any major points since the Siege of Constantinople.

So yeah, I can understand if a few Muslims might have whooped it up a bit when they heard a couple of their own guys had taken out the tallest buildings in the greatest city of the most powerful nation in the kafir (infidel) world. Buildings which were, of course, symbols of the awesome financial power of the West in general, and of the US in particular.

However, I think that Al-Jazeera was a bit irresponsible in making sure a reporter was right there on the spot in Islamabad and Kabul to film the pockets of happy celebrants, so that the only images a shocked America got of the Muslim Reaction were of people dancing in the streets.

[quote]Varqanir wrote:

A bit like the last scene in Star Wars when the Death Star explodes. I’m sure the Rebels didn’t pause to consider the human cost of destroying a battle station the size of a small moon. Their wild jubilation was over the destruction of a deadly symbol of the power projected by the hated Empire.[/quote]

CLERKS aside, those were soldiers on the Death Star. The Towers were packed with civilians.

[quote]

Back to the Muslims vs. the West, this is a game which has been going on for a thousand years, and their side hadn’t scored any major points since the Siege of Constantinople.

So yeah, I can understand if a few Muslims might have whooped it up a bit when they heard a couple of their own guys had taken out the tallest buildings in the greatest city of the most powerful nation in the kafir (infidel) world. Buildings which were, of course, symbols of the awesome financial power of the West in general, and of the US in particular.

However, I think that Al-Jazeera was a bit irresponsible in making sure a reporter was right there on the spot in Islamabad and Kabul to film the pockets of happy celebrants, so that the only images a shocked America got of the Muslim Reaction were of people dancing in the streets.[/quote]

What evidence do you have that it was small pockets of people celebrating? I saw coverage from Egypt, Palestinian areas, Afghanistan, Syria, and Iran that day. People cheering, burning American flags, passing out candy, jumping around with their kids on their shoulders. I didn’t see any evidence that it was just a couple of isolated incidents.

First of all FightingIrish, thanks for that article. I really love you for it :).

Islam does teach peace, and yes, many do protest in the thousands in peace protests, and are mixed up with everyone else in denouncing terrorism.

As for celebrating the 9/11 attacks, I was in Saudi Arabia at the time, and trust me, no one was celebrating. Everyone was just scared half to death thinking what the repurcussions would be against Muslims.

The reason some ‘Islamists’ do what they do is either for revenge for the deaths of their families which is either directly or indirectly a result of US foreign policy (revenge is strongly condemned in Islam). Or for political and economic gain.

Political parties in the middle east and Pakistan use the Quran as a means to gain support… when all they’re really doing is wanting to win an election so they can sit on a bucketload of money.

Real Islamic government does not support the use of an army for Imperialistic use or terrorism. Only for self-defense. Islam may only be transferred to another nation through the use of peaceful proposal. If the nation does not accept, Muslims are to leave it alone.

So why all this violence by Muslims. Simple. Just like any other human being. Muslims are corruptible by exciting dogma, false hope and deception through economic and political means. They are also prone to being greedy for power.

This whole mess going on. Its not a problem to do with Muslims or the US. There are tons of good people in Islam and the US. Its the nature of man, especially those with too much power in their regions.

Sadly, not everyone can be a Jesus or a Muhammed.

*bump

Great opinion piece. Hope to see more like this.

[quote]Zap Branigan wrote:
We need to see thousands of Muslims marching in the streets denouncing terrorism.
[/quote]

Ok, thousands have protested the terroist actions of Israel in Lebanon.

Now what?