T Nation

Muslims and Koreans

Iran condemns Virginia Tech shooting.

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1176152818054

At Virginia Tech, Koreans Are Fleeing The Campus, Fearing Backlash.

http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2007/04/17/koreans_fleeing/?source=whitelist

[quote]lixy wrote:
Iran condemns Virginia Tech shooting.

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1176152818054[/quote]

Well now, that’s just plain wonderful! I retract my many rips on Islam.

I’ve been to Saudi Arabia for Gulf War 1 and i’ve been to Baghdad, Iraq for Gulf War 2. Currently i am stationed in Turkey. I’m surrounded by muslims and have dealt with them for years.

there is a difference between most muslims in the US and those in Iraq, Afghanistan, Turkey, etc. Based upon my experience Muslims in the middle east have no concern for human life. They have nothing and they will never have anything because they can’t stop fighting…not just us, but themselves.

one of these days, hopefully sooner than later, we will stop making them rich by buying their oil. when they no longer are making billions and billions of dollars they will be nothing. if you have ever been to one of these countries, you’ll quickly realize that they are not peace loving people.

only 4 months left and i get out of Turkey and back in my own country.

[quote]HeelZ_Fan wrote:
I’ve been to Saudi Arabia for Gulf War 1 and i’ve been to Baghdad, Iraq for Gulf War 2. Currently i am stationed in Turkey. I’m surrounded by muslims and have dealt with them for years.

there is a difference between most muslims in the US and those in Iraq, Afghanistan, Turkey, etc. Based upon my experience Muslims in the middle east have no concern for human life. They have nothing and they will never have anything because they can’t stop fighting…not just us, but themselves. [/quote]

The position you’re in doesn’t qualify you as a fair judge of those people or their culture.

Well over 90% of the population of the countries you cited are opposed to US bases on their lands. Can you blame them?

What if, say Turkey, asked Washington to station some Turkish troops in New Jersey? In the highly unlikely (not to say downright impossible) event that they agree, I’m CERTAIN that the Turkish soldiers will have a similar sentiment to yours. Here’s what they might say:

“Based upon my experience American in the mainland have no concern for human life. They have everything but they will never enjoy anything because they can’t stop fighting…not just us, but themselves.”

Ok, that was surreal. But you should be able to get my point nonetheless. When has a colonial power said anything good about the lands it has its troops in? I recall that they were all calling the indigenous “savages” and other derogatory terms.

Empires always played the card that the others were “uncivilized” to justify military intervention. I’ll preempt questionning of the empirial aspirations of the US by asking what else would you call a country with 702 military bases in 132 countries?

Hoping you get home safe and sound.

[quote]lixy wrote:
HeelZ_Fan wrote:
I’ve been to Saudi Arabia for Gulf War 1 and i’ve been to Baghdad, Iraq for Gulf War 2. Currently i am stationed in Turkey. I’m surrounded by muslims and have dealt with them for years.

there is a difference between most muslims in the US and those in Iraq, Afghanistan, Turkey, etc. Based upon my experience Muslims in the middle east have no concern for human life. They have nothing and they will never have anything because they can’t stop fighting…not just us, but themselves.

The position you’re in doesn’t qualify you as a fair judge of those people or their culture.

Well over 90% of the population of the countries you cited are opposed to US bases on their lands. Can you blame them?

What if, say Turkey, asked Washington to station some Turkish troops in New Jersey? In the highly unlikely (not to say downright impossible) event that they agree, I’m CERTAIN that the Turkish soldiers will have a similar sentiment to yours. Here’s what they might say:

“Based upon my experience American in the mainland have no concern for human life. They have everything but they will never enjoy anything because they can’t stop fighting…not just us, but themselves.”

Ok, that was surreal. But you should be able to get my point nonetheless. When has a colonial power said anything good about the lands it has its troops in? I recall that they were all calling the indigenous “savages” and other derogatory terms.

Empires always played the card that the others were “uncivilized” to justify military intervention. I’ll preempt questionning of the empirial aspirations of the US by asking what else would you call a country with 702 military bases in 132 countries?

Hoping you get home safe and sound. [/quote]

The way that Islam imperialists talk about the uncivilized hethens in west? :wink:

[quote]GDollars37 wrote:
PGJ wrote:
Headhunter wrote:
"Speaking of which, has anyone else noticed the public expressions of shame and contrition from the Korean-American community after the Virginia Tech shooting? Of course, no one blames this exemplary community for the actions of one nut. The Koreans are manifestly law-abiding and decent ? nipping at the heels of Italians as the greatest Americans and tied for second with the Cubans.

Indeed, I believe this marks the first time a Korean has killed anyone in the United States, not involving an automobile. Nonetheless, Korean congregations, community groups and the family members themselves are issuing statements of sorrow. Not “pleas for tolerance.” But sorrow. Remorse. Remember those? They were big back in the day.

If the Koreans can do it, why can’t the Muslims? What explains the lack of a Muslim guilt impulse ? so normal, as seen in the case of the saddened Koreans ? after dozens of terrorist attacks on Americans?"

http://www.anncoulter.com/cgi-local/welcome.cgi

Korean Americans are largely Christian. Christian society denounces criminal acts such as these and prays for victims. Christian society values ALL human life regardless of religion (I can hear the bleeding hearts saying "then why are we killing in Iraq…blah, blah, blah).

Islam celebrates the death of all non-muslims. Muslims only value human life as long as they are muslim…and their particular brand of mulsim (oh and male). That’s why it’s OK for Suni’s to kill Shia. They consider each other as sub-human, as well as all non-believers. They believe that if you catch a non-muslim in a muslim nation, it is OK to keep that person as a slave and if you don’t need a slave, go ahead and kill him.

Islam is not the religion of tolerance as some people would like you to believe.

Sweet, outright falsehood mixed with massive generalizations. Islam has serious problems, but you’d rather just slam it without knowing anything about it. Care to show the Koran passages, because last I checked Muslims have been much more tolerant towards Christians than the reverse throughout most of history.[/quote]

History doesn’t count here. What Christianity did in the past obviously wasn’t really Christian right?

Just like all the good things muslims did must have been while they were not being particularly Islamic… but I thought Islam meant submition? Hmmm…

[quote]At Virginia Tech, Koreans Are Fleeing The Campus, Fearing Backlash.

http://www.salon.com/...ource=whitelist[/quote]

Interesting article. They interview a few Korean people. One says this:

“It’s like when 9/11 happened,” Ko said. “Arab people are victims even though they didn’t do anything wrong. It’s just the same to me.”

The next says this:

“If someone lost a loved one, of course, they are upset. Some bad things might happened just because I am Korean.”

The next says this:

She hopes others see the crime as the act of an individual, but she is worried. “This is an individual thing, not a nation thing,” she said.

One says:

I just don’t feel like I’m scared."

Other quotes:

“It’s not going to be taken as a race thing,” he said. “People understand this is a special case.”

“It’s interesting that he was an international student, but I feel it isn’t really relevant at all to anything.”

So the majority of Koreans in the article DON’T fear violence.

I have not heard any stories about violence done to Koreans in Virginia due to this outrage. Just because the article says they fear a backlash, does not mean that there is indeed a backlash.

In videos of the vigils held at campus, there were people from all races, and no one was seen attacking the orientals present.

Maybe if this happened in a muslim country, there would be backlash against Koreans, but in this case, in this country, I believe the people know that the gunman was mentally ill and his attack had nothing to do with his race.

[quote]Headhunter wrote:
If the Koreans can do it, why can’t the Muslims? What explains the lack of a Muslim guilt impulse ? so normal, as seen in the case of the saddened Koreans ? after dozens of terrorist attacks on Americans?"
[/quote]

The Islamic Circle of North America declares Friday, September 14, 2001, a day of mourning and prayers.

The Islamic Circle of North America (ICNA) is extremely horrified and saddened by the tragedy in New York and Washington D.C.
Our hearts and prayers are with the families of the victims of this horrible and despicable crime.
We condemn this heinous act and call upon our political leaders and the media to act responsibly,
and not generalize when speculating about the perpetrators.
Islam does not permit such unjust actions.
Muslims are not terrorists and we condemn any terrorist attack against all people.

There were several hundred Muslims working in the World Trade Center.
And, a large number of Muslims used to offer Friday prayer in the World Trade Center.
There are many Muslims, who are still among the missing.

We appreciate and thank President Bush for acknowledging that American Muslims and Arab American are also saddened by this terrorist attack
and by making it clear that any hate crime against Muslims will not be tolerated.

Our hearts are with those who have lost loved ones in this terrible tragedy and our prayers are with the departed souls.

The Islamic Circle of North America declares Friday, September 12, 2001, a day of mourning and prayers.
All the Muslims are requested to make special prayers for the dead and the injured and also for the suffering families.

Council on American Islamic Relations

(full page ad in Washington Post)

ISNA JOINS AMPCC IN CONDEMNING TERRORIST ATTACKS

(Plainfield, IN - 9/11/2001) - The Islamic Society of North America (ISNA), along with other Muslim organizations throughout North America, today condemned the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington and offered condolences to the families of those who were killed or injured.

The AMPCC statement read in part:

“American Muslims utterly condemn what are vicious and cowardly acts of terrorism against innocent civilians. We join with all Americans in calling for the swift apprehension and punishment of the perpetrators. No political cause could ever be assisted by such immoral acts.”

Signatories:

American Muslim Alliance

American Muslim Council

Association of Muslim Scientists and Engineers

Association of Muslim Social Scientists

Council on American-Islamic Relations

Islamic Medical Association of North America

Islamic Circle of North America

Islamic Society of North America

Ministry of Imam W. Deen Mohammed

Muslim American Society

Muslim Public Affairs Council


March 9, 2003

(full page ad NY Times - Week in Review)

CAIR condemnation of suicide bombing

(WASHINGTON, D.C., 3/28/2002) - The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), a Washington-based Islamic advocacy group, today condemned a bomb attack on a Passover celebration in the Middle East that left 20 people dead and more than 100 wounded.

In a statement, CAIR said:

"We condemn this attack and all other attacks on innocent civilians. Illegitimate and counterproductive tactics must not be used in the legitimate struggle to end Israel’s brutal occupation.

"This attack is of particular concern coming as it did during a religious observance in which the focus is remembrance of God.

Friday, 14 September, 2001, 19:26 GMT 20:26 UK BBC World

Religious leaders condemned the attacks

During Friday prayers Muslim clerics in the Arab world have strongly condemned Tuesday’s attacks in America. It’s not courage in any way to kill an innocent person, or to kill thousands of people, including men and women and children, said Sheik Mohammed Sayed Tantawi.

Syria’s most senior Islamic leader described the attacks on America as a terrorist act, as ignoble as what he called the state terrorism practised by Israel. Hundreds of Palestinians also rallied in the West Bank city of Ramallah to show support for Americans killed in the attacks, as well as condemn Israeli killing of Palestinians in Jenin. And in Iran, Tehran’s main football stadium observed an unprecedented minute’s silence in sympathy with the victims. ‘State terrorism’ Iran’s Ayatollah Imami Kashani spoke of a catastrophic act of terrorism which could only be condemned by all Muslims, adding the whole world should mobilise against terrorism. There were many expressions of sympathy throughout the Arab world

But if its roots were really to be tackled, terrorism and its practitioners would have to be defined, he said, pointing to Israel and calling it a “terrorist state which was killing children”. America’s support and its arrogant policies around the world might help to explain the brutalism of the hijackers, he added. On Thursday night, people who tried to stage a commemorative vigil in central Tehran, in spite of the ban on public gatherings, were broken up by police and Islamic volunteers. ‘Barbaric acts’ The head of al-Azhar in Cairo, one of Sunni Islam’s highest religious authority, said attacking innocent people was not courageous, but stupid and would be punished on Judgement Day. Gaza City imam “It’s not courage in any way to kill an innocent person, or to kill thousands of people, including men and women and children,” said Sheik Mohammed Sayed Tantawi. In Lebanon the spiritual leader of the Shia guerrilla group, Hezbollah, called the attacks “barbaric acts”. He added even though Muslims were opposed to the American Government because of its support for Israel, the American people should not be blamed.

League of Arab States:
“The General-Secretariat of the League of Arab States shares with the people and government of the United States of America the feelings of revulsion, horror and shock over the terrorist attacks that ripped through the World Trade Centre and Pentagon, inflicting heavy damage and killing and wounding thousands of many nationalities. These terrorist crimes have been viewed by the League as inadmissible and deserving all condemnation. Divergence of views between the Arabs and the United States over the latter?s foreign policy on the Middle East crisis does in no way adversely affect the common Arab attitude of compassion with the people and government of the United States at such moments of facing the menace and ruthlessness of international terrorism. In more than one statement released since the horrendous attacks, the League has also expressed deep sympathy with the families of the victims. In remarks to newsmen immediately following the tragic events, Arab League Secretary-General Amre Moussa described the feelings of the Arab world as demonstrably sympathetic with the American people, particularly with families and individuals who lost their loved ones. “It is indeed tormenting that any country or people or city anywhere in the world be the scene of such disastrous attacks,” he added. While convinced that it is both inconceivable and lamentable that such a large-scale, organised terrorist campaign take place anywhere, anytime, the League believes that the dreadful attacks against WTC and the Pentagon unveil, time and again, that the cancer of terrorism can be extensively damaging if left unchecked. It follows that there is a pressing and urgent need to combat world terrorism. In this context, an earlier call by [Egyptian] President Hosni Mubarak for convening an international conference to draw up universal accord on ways and means to eradicate this phenomenon and demonstrate international solidarity is worthy of active consideration. The Arabs have walked a large distancein the fight against cross-border terrorism by concluding in April 1998 the Arab Agreement on Combating Terrorism.”
September 17, 2001, http://www.leagueofarabstates.org/E_Perspectives_17_09_01.asp

Shaykh Yusuf al-Qaradawi, chairman of the Sunna and Sira Council, Qatar:
Our hearts bleed for the attacks that has targeted the World Trade Center [WTC], as well as other institutions in the United States despite our strong oppositions to the American biased policy towards Israel on the military, political and economic fronts. Islam, the religion of tolerance, holds the human soul in high esteem, and considers the attack against innocent human beings a grave sin, this is backed by the Qur’anic verse which reads: ?Who so ever kills a human being [as punishment] for [crimes] other than manslaughter or [sowing] corruption in the earth, it shall be as if he has killed all mankind, and who so ever saves the life of one, it shall be as if he had saved the life of all mankind’ (Al-Ma’idah:32).”
Statement of September 13, 2001. http://www.islamonline.net/English/News/2001-09/13/article25.shtml. Arabic original at http://www.qaradawi.net/site/topics/article.asp?cu_no=2&item_no=1665&version=1&template_id=130&parent_id=17

Tahirul Qadri, head of the Awami Tehrik Party, Pakistan:
"Bombing embassies or destroying non-military installations like the World Trade Center is no jihad. … “[T]hose who launched the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks not only killed thousands of innocent people in the United States but also put the lives of millions of Muslims across the world at risk. … Bin Laden is not a prophet that we should put thousands of lives at risk for.”
United Press International, October 18, 2001

HH… you have been pwned. Welcome to pwnville, your trip is free, courtesy of Micheal570.

Hopefully we won’t abandon the moderate muslims in Iraq to sectarian Jihadists and terrorists.

“But if its roots were really to be tackled, terrorism and its practitioners would have to be defined, he said, pointing to Israel and calling it a “terrorist state which was killing children”. America’s support and its arrogant policies around the world might help to explain the brutalism of the hijackers, he added.”

What they really said:

We all feel real bad, but you deserve it.

Typical.

It follows that there is a pressing and urgent need to combat world terrorism. In this context, an earlier call by [Egyptian] President Hosni Mubarak for convening an international conference to draw up universal accord on ways and means to eradicate this phenomenon and demonstrate international solidarity is worthy of active consideration. The Arabs have walked a large distancein the fight against cross-border terrorism by concluding in April 1998 the Arab Agreement on Combating Terrorism."
September 17, 2001, http://www.leagueofarabstates

Why would anyone care what Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak says, isn’t he an evil dictator, friend of Great Satan?

(At least that’s what I’ve been told on this forum.)

Michael570 forgot to mention palestinians dancing in the streets… lebanese arabs dancing in the streets… morbid celebrations in the arab world when the news got around.