T Nation

Music You Like That Would Surprise Others


#41

First CD I ever purchased:

517N7Y7xjUL


#42

I mean, of course! I had a couple of his CDs.


#43

Will sing along to every track on every album, including a mean rubber biscuit.

I also may or may not have actually used this during a social studies class presentation in high school:


#44

Oh & Hardcore…I used to absolutely worship hardcore music till it had coitus with the devil and became all dubsteppy!


#45

I saw the Eagle’s doc. Loved it. RIP Glenn Frey… He was the nucleus of the band, most people think Don Henley was.
I don’t think people accurately remember how big The Eagles were in the '70’s. They were mega-huge.
Artists just don’t get that big anymore. The Eagles were an albatross, totally dominant force on the music scene.

The thing I like about when musicians played musical instruments, is they had a defining sound no one else can imitate. You knew who the bad was even if you didn’t know the song.

Now I cannot tell the difference between Sia and Lady Gaga, the Migos vs. every other rap group that sounds like them… Everybody sounds the same. My guess is that’s because the only real difference is the singer. All the music is made by Watson of IBM. And when they digitally process voices, the voices lose their distinctive tenor and everybody sounds the same.


#46

Pantera, baby!


#47

And Christine McVie~ Fleetwood Mac. :heart:
Great natural on Lindsey Buckingham…


#48

#49

It was fantastic. I don’t throw this praise around lightly - it was a perfectly crafted documentary, with the right subjects to make it interesting. Great job splicing together so much footage from the 70’s mixed in with the last few years of interviews, really told an incredible tale of each member’s journey into (and out of) the band. You casually learn that Glenn got his start goofing around in the studio with Bob Seeger, that Don talked Kenny Rogers into coming to see his band as a kid, that Glenn learned to write songs by living above Jackson Browne…I mean, that’s all just incredible stuff.

Re: the latter point about a defining sound, another killer scene from the doc was Glyn Johns describing how the first couple times he heard them, he thought they were a very confused band, didn’t really know what they wanted to be, then he heard them fooling around as they broke for lunch with a harmony and said “There! That’s it!” - which became their calling card, those incredible vocal harmonies.


#50

Hell Yes!!!
Anybody with a Hunter S. Thompson avatar is bound to like Blue-grass.


#51

It’s crazy, I know, but I had you pegged for a Deadhead.


#52

I secretly love SKA. Reel Big Fish is a favorite.


#53

That’s too obvious. And I could fill this whole thread in about 5 minutes with hours and hours of Grateful Dead shows from '66 to '95.
I am typical in the sense that I have hundreds of soundboard recordings from every iteration of the Dead. Couple of years in the '80’s I don’t have because they had a terrible sound guy who didn’t run the tapes correctly.
Fortunately, there was about a decade where the Dead allowed soundboard recordings to flow freely on the internet, I grabbed everything I could get.
I had the linux server sucking down 10 at a time sometimes. I still have some I haven’t even unzipped yet.
BTW, 1977 Atlanta, Fox theater run was amazing…


#54

LOL youtube won’t let me view the video in my country! Must be some really hardcore stuff.


#55

My first cassette tape.


#56

I just listened to Ice Ice Baby last night…


#57

Did you rap along with it?


#58

Worse, I rapped and danced…


#59

I’ve only seen them once. Buckeye Lake Ohio in '94. I have no idea if that show was any good or not. I’m just assuming that it was. Everybody had a very good time.


#60

Fix that typo…