T Nation

Muscles Involved in a Straight Punch


Which group of muscle is responsible for most of the power and impact generated by a straight punch?

Upper Back? Shoulder? Chest? or even the Lower back because of the swing?

like chubbs from billy madison said, “its all in the hips, its all in the hips, baby.”

i’ve fought professionally and the most important muscles that go into punching are your calves, hams and glutes.

as for upper body muscles, the best way to train them to be stronger for punching is to learn the proper mechanics and then check out rosstraining.com for some good exercises to improve explosiveness.

well that and the person on the left isn’t throwing a straight punch he is coming over the top.

like the first response it really is your whole body, mnus your arms. Remembering to switch your shoulders usually helps me involve my hips and core.

Yes that is the swing I was talking about but I thought it would come mostly from the lower back.

But does size really matters for the power of the punch or is it ALL about the proper technique?

If it does matters, which specifical upper body muscles would have the biggest role in it

Is it possible for this man to throw a stronger blow than Ronnie?

Look troll-a-tron, if you’re going to troll away then dont mess it up with shit grammar and spelling.

You generate all your power from your posterior chain and technical acuity. That it all. After that “strength” matters more than how big you are.

-chris

Fuck man. Just because I dont have your knowledge on the subject it means I am troll?

If you dont want to help just dont screw with the post

[quote]Player64 wrote:
Yes that is the swing I was talking about but I thought it would come mostly from the lower back.
[/quote]

Nope, in order to generate force you must push off of something else (have a base). The only thing to push off of (unless maybe your back is against a wall of something like that) is the ground. Your legs are what connect you to the ground.

Yes, it matters. That’s why there are weight classes. In physics Force=Mass*Accelration

The more mass, the more force. Proper punching mechanics derive their power from the shifting of the bodyweight, rotational forces, pushing off the ground, and lastly the speed with which the arm delivers that force into the target. It’s a kinetic chain.

That has to be a joke question.

Yes, if he trains how to punch and masters the mechanics, and Ronnie doesn’t ever train how to punch correctly, the boxer will throw the harder punches (most likely anyhow). If all else is equal, the bigger man throws the harder punch.

Ok that guy’s trolling but for anyone sincerely interested…

It was on Fox Sports “Sports Science”. Rampage told them “You gotta put ya ass into it”. It turns out he was right. Hips and gluteus muscles generate the force.

It seems to me like most power is projected from that back leg and the hips.

In my opinion, there’s a few things. Being “loaded” or “cocked” will give you a much more powerful punch. A lot of guys arm punch, you gotta put your shoulders into it also and rotate them.

Something simple is just throwing your right hand, yeah it’ll be pretty powerful.
Now how about throwing a feint (with your lead hand) then throwing your right.
The power in the punch will be significantly increased because your other shoulder is cocked back and loaded.

Also I think having quite a bit of weight on your back foot and throwing will have an impact on your straight right.
Aside from that I think it’s more distrubuting your weight properly also
and it is like a kinetic chain where you start from the bottom, and it goes through your whole body.

Properly putting the weight on the punch will make a big difference.
Hence when you see some fast jabs and such but nothing behind it, and some people sit behind their jab effectively and it hurts more. Just my opinion though.
You have some guys who have mediocre technique who are big punchers…

Punching is really a whole body thing. Straights are most effective pushed off the rear leg and slightly pivoting, hooks are most effective through rotational power of the core, and the most devastating uppercuts I’ve seen come from guys push up with their legs.

My mate and sparring partner is a tall lanky skinny bastard and he can bang hard. Great straight he has.

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
Player64 wrote:
Yes that is the swing I was talking about but I thought it would come mostly from the lower back.

Nope, in order to generate force you must push off of something else (have a base). The only thing to push off of (unless maybe your back is against a wall of something like that) is the ground. Your legs are what connect you to the ground.

But does size really matters for the power of the punch or is it ALL about the proper technique?

Yes, it matters. That’s why there are weight classes. In physics Force=Mass*Accelration

The more mass, the more force. Proper punching mechanics derive their power from the shifting of the bodyweight, rotational forces, pushing off the ground, and lastly the speed with which the arm delivers that force into the target. It’s a kinetic chain.

Is it possible for this man to throw a stronger blow than Ronnie?

That has to be a joke question.

Yes, if he trains how to punch and masters the mechanics, and Ronnie doesn’t ever train how to punch correctly, the boxer will throw the harder punches (most likely anyhow). If all else is equal, the bigger man throws the harder punch.[/quote]

/thread

I’ve actually got a question…
When throwing the straight and hook.
Is it beneficial to as you turn your waist, to also turn your hips hard with it also to increase power?

And one more question:
I see lots of boxers throw right hands that are not direct straight punches, it looks as if they are throwing a baseball…

they throw it but instead of putting their arm back to them…they follow through with that punch, and punch downwards…what is this punch called?
I’ve seen it produce many KO’s.
Shane Mosley has an awesome vid of him doing it in a fight. I’ve seen it more pronounced in other boxing fights also.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJGzq5g63MQ&feature=PlayList&p=7AD921FE0D5E4896&playnext=1&index=6
That’s a link where shane does it…1:10-1:30 in that time frame

Overhand right, and right hook.

Also at about 1:20 the one that they show twice was a straight right but he couldn’t rechamber his arm because the guy started to fall on it…hah.

You can produce a tremendous amount of force wih it. Right hook to the body will drop damn near anyone if you know how to use it right.

And hooks to the body are sugar shane’s speciality

[quote]rasturai wrote:
I’ve actually got a question…
When throwing the straight and hook.
Is it beneficial to as you turn your waist, to also turn your hips hard with it also to increase power?
[/quote]

Again, it’s a kinetic chain. You want a “power line” coming from your rear foot (which should be pointing at what you are trying to hit), to your rear knee, to your right hip, to your right shoulder and down your right arm into the target when the punch lands. In order for that to happen, you must rotate your body (hips included).

And yes, you want this rotation to be a powerful one.

[quote]rasturai wrote:
I’ve actually got a question…
When throwing the straight and hook.
Is it beneficial to as you turn your waist, to also turn your hips hard with it also to increase power?
[/quote]

Like Sento said, your punch derives it’s power from kinetic linking. And you want that to be a pretty powerful turn, as much as possible without going off balance.

On a (lead) hook, you’re going to pivot hard, using that lead leg as a hinge to rotate your body around. Pretend like your crushing a cockroach with your foot.

Castillo was one of the best hookers around, and he you could see his whole body turn into some of those punches.

Marciano was big on these too. I can’t really use it… I’m a southpaw, and I just can’t seem to generate that much power with it. However, if I use my right, I can. Go figure.

I don’t like them because they leave you really open, and you’re likely open not only to counterpunches but also off balance.

You’re swinging for the fences on this one…

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
rasturai wrote:
I’ve actually got a question…
When throwing the straight and hook.
Is it beneficial to as you turn your waist, to also turn your hips hard with it also to increase power?

Like Sento said, your punch derives it’s power from kinetic linking. And you want that to be a pretty powerful turn, as much as possible without going off balance.

On a (lead) hook, you’re going to pivot hard, using that lead leg as a hinge to rotate your body around. Pretend like your crushing a cockroach with your foot.

Castillo was one of the best hookers around, and he you could see his whole body turn into some of those punches.

And one more question:
I see lots of boxers throw right hands that are not direct straight punches, it looks as if they are throwing a baseball…

they throw it but instead of putting their arm back to them…they follow through with that punch, and punch downwards…what is this punch called?
I’ve seen it produce many KO’s.
Shane Mosley has an awesome vid of him doing it in a fight. I’ve seen it more pronounced in other boxing fights also.

That’s a link where shane does it…1:10-1:30 in that time frame

Marciano was big on these too. I can’t really use it… I’m a southpaw, and I just can’t seem to generate that much power with it. However, if I use my right, I can. Go figure.

I don’t like them because they leave you really open, and you’re likely open not only to counterpunches but also off balance.

You’re swinging for the fences on this one…[/quote]

Yeah, I don’t like overhands either. And IMO there is not even close to as much impact force generated on an overhand as there is on a straight right (if you throw it right).

Swing hooks are the same way. I was taught to keep my hooks very tight, compact and more like a straight punch at an angle than a swing. Much more powerful this way, less openings to counter and it really allows you to get your body behind the punch. This is how Ed Futch taught how to hook.

The more extended swing style (ala De la Hoya) has better range and there are obviously guys out there that have KO power with it. I just don’t like it very much.

Okay so those punches where it looks more of a swing with the right…would be the overhand right?..i see it with hooks with the right sometimes too. It does produce some good KO’s, but yes it can leave you open. Perhaps as a finisher or if the guy is completely open hand down and you know you can get it.

I will chime in later en detail here.
I don’t agree with a lot of the kinetic chain theory or Rampage’s booty theory. Of course it is a big part of punching, but not biggest or only thing.

This is something I’ve been researching since I started MA.

Fight Science presents a lot of half truths.
I definitely do not recommend this show to any sincere martial artist.

it seems like the really dramatic overhand rights are suited for mma, also they’re likely just messy boxers. But you see it a lot in the cage.
I wonder if perhaps its more suited to the smaller gloves, which are harder to block in general than 16 ouncers.
Chuck Liddel is the master of the overhand right, and his is ridiculous…self described as if he was throwing a baseball.