T Nation

Mountaindog Training


#1

Just wondering what everyone thought of the mountain dog training articles posted by John Meadows? Would anyone consider doing all of these at once ?


#2

I think they are awesome and I would certainly incorporate ideas from them if not outright just use all of them as a template for a four/five day split.


#3

ive incorporated a TON of his ideas into my training and ive made great progress over the last year.

john meadows is an incredible resource


#4

[quote]JoabSonOfZeruiah wrote:
I think they are awesome and I would certainly incorporate ideas from them if not outright just use all of them as a template for a four/five day split.[/quote]

+1
Had one of my best “bodybuilding” year with that, but it was like a space trip for my CNS. Lot harder than your typical oly-lifting response, if you got lot of sleep and eat time, then fine. Still love it. Also, some kind of deloading might be in place time to time.


#5

[quote]Mr. Walkway wrote:
ive incorporated a TON of his ideas into my training and ive made great progress over the last year.

john meadows is an incredible resource[/quote]
Agree, great resource. Love the ideas too and the fact that he’s not offering “the whole truth and nothing but the DC truth” kind of fix. Just try and pick whatever works.


#6

This approach was SOP throughout the 80’s and early 90’s.
Good Times!


#7

Hire Meadows

One of the best investment ive made bbing wise


#8

Meadows has been the biggest influence on my training I think out of anyone.

The principles that have really worked for me are:

  • pre-exhaust hammies before squatting
  • mega high rep burnout sets for quads
  • stupidly high reps for rear/lateral delts
  • high rep RDLs as a finisher for hams

seems I really respond to high rep training. Kinda annoying I spent so many years doing 5s but hey ho.

If I ever meet the guy I’m going to take him in a manly embrace, and with a tear in my eye be like “Thank you, oh god thank you so much…”


#9

[quote]rds63799 wrote:
Meadows has been the biggest influence on my training I think out of anyone.

seems I really respond to high rep training. Kinda annoying I spent so many years doing 5s but hey ho.[/quote]

I suspect Meadows is familiar with ‘low rep’ work. To keep thing moving forward requires a cleaver and a scapel.


#10

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:

[quote]rds63799 wrote:
Meadows has been the biggest influence on my training I think out of anyone.

seems I really respond to high rep training. Kinda annoying I spent so many years doing 5s but hey ho.[/quote]

I suspect Meadows is familiar with ‘low rep’ work. To keep thing moving forward requires a cleaver and a scapel. [/quote]

oh I’m sure he is, it’s just that the routines where he’s recommended high rep stuff have really worked for me.


#11

[quote]zraw wrote:
Hire Meadows

One of the best investment ive made bbing wise[/quote]

I was looking into this the other day. I’m going to give some of the mountain dog stuff a try and see if I like his methods.


#12

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:

[quote]rds63799 wrote:
Meadows has been the biggest influence on my training I think out of anyone.

seems I really respond to high rep training. Kinda annoying I spent so many years doing 5s but hey ho.[/quote]

I suspect Meadows is familiar with ‘low rep’ work. To keep thing moving forward requires a cleaver and a scapel. [/quote]

Hi, I’m not familiar with that analogy. Does it mean ‘You need big basics and smaller details’?


#13

i really like the mountain dog training! i try some workouts on my last pré contest prep, and work very well for me! it is hard, intense and high volume! but i thinks this is the way i like lol! now off season i trying some stuff of his diet!


#14

"I long suspected that chains and bands could play a part in hypertrophy-based training, but the missing link has always been where and how often it should be used.

After working with John Meadows for over two years ? a serious bodybuilder who understands the science of hypertrophy training ? it’s all finally coming together.

We’re tossing ideas around and experimenting like crazy ? he the volume-driven bodybuilder, me the hardcore strength guy ? and what we’ve come up with will push his programming to a whole other level. And we’re going to share this with T Nation readers."

-Dave Tate

From the article posted today in case anyone missed it. Sounds pretty interesting, i’m exited.


#15

^^
Indeed it does. I attempting to incorporate some of his ideas into my current training. Limited to what i can do as i train at home but it still should be good for a change


#16

He writes in the best articles in my opinion (for bodybuilders). And his ‘Arms’ article is awesome. Required reading.


#17

[quote]Maiden3.16 wrote:
"I long suspected that chains and bands could play a part in hypertrophy-based training, but the missing link has always been where and how often it should be used.

After working with John Meadows for over two years ? a serious bodybuilder who understands the science of hypertrophy training ? it’s all finally coming together.

We’re tossing ideas around and experimenting like crazy ? he the volume-driven bodybuilder, me the hardcore strength guy ? and what we’ve come up with will push his programming to a whole other level. And we’re going to share this with T Nation readers."

-Dave Tate

From the article posted today in case anyone missed it. Sounds pretty interesting, i’m exited.

[/quote]

This may be a little preview of what is to come ( taken from another forum ).

Mountain Dog training- Elitefts LTT5 Wrap up.

First off I would like to thank John Meadows for giving me the opportunity to share what I learned from his lecture this Friday at the Elitefts learn to train seminar. I was lucky enough to get to travel to London, Ohio and rub elbows with some of the strongest and smartest people on the planet. If you ever get the opportunity to see people of this caliber speak, and or corner them in a room somewhere and force them to converse with you, I highly suggest you do it. So without any further ado, here is some awesome information on training (and a little on nutrition).

Opening notes: Nutrition needs to match training, not a one dimensional thing. John did a quick rehash over his presentation at the last seminar around periworkout nutrition. John believes this is 80% of the battle nutritionally speaking, and again nutrition must match training style. They canâ??t be looked at two different variables.

We are in a war of muscular protein breakdown vs. Muscle protein synthesis.

-Supporting muscle protein synthesis creates more muscle, and more muscle = a leaner physique.

-We can prime the effect by minimizing muscle protein breakdown DURING training.

Pre-training nutrition- 30-60 minutes pre training: Some protein, moderate carbs, and a little fat to slow the release of the carbs so there is no issues with hypoglycemia.

Intra-workout nutrition: High molecular weight low osmalality carbs/protein hydrolysates.
Start sipping10-15 minutes before workout, then continue through workout.

Begin lecture on training: So four basic steps occur in the execution of a mountain dog workout. These steps have a side benefit of keeping you in one piece, so you also can do what you love (assuming you love to train) for a long time.

Step 1: Pump nutrient loaded blood into pre-activated muscle.
Usually done with dumbells or some type of machine… This exercise should not be hard on the joints at all, but does not have to be isolation work either. Itâ??s not pure pre-exhaustion. Itâ??s starting the delivery of those nutrients in the intra drink to muscle, and also filling the muscle full of blood so muscle are primed for the next phase.

Funny note â?? he had a picture of Galactus representing this step.

Step 2: Activate/stimulate fast twitch fibers while in reactive pump state.
This step involves using a moderately heavy weight in an explosive concentric manner. The heavy weight and acceleration are there to activate as much tissue as possible.
Rep range here usually falls in the 5-6 range. The more force you can generate, the more you can engage high threshold motor units. Using accommodating resistance, especially chains, seem to prime this affect.

He had a picture of Colossus representing this step.

Step 3: Induce supra-maximal pump volume- Think fire, skin splitting, throbbing, cant put your limbs in any type of normal position type feeling.
A good way to do this is by slowing down the eccentric tempo.

John went through explanation of myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic hypertrophy here, explaining that one is not better than other, both fully maxed are the best. This step probably develops muscles though creating more volumous cells (sarcoplasmic hypertrophy), not necessarily by adding sarcomeres in a fiber (myofibrillar hypertrophy, which is what the heavier weight will do on Step 2).

He had a picture of the human torch representing this step. Burn baby burn.

Step 4: Load and stretch a pumped muscle.
Increased recovery is one benefit of this type of loaded stretching at the end of the workout. Whether hyperplasia occurs is very debatable, despite the bird hanging upside down study done years back.

He had a picture of Mr Fantastic to represent this step.

Johnâ??s programming uses many different approaches to make a muscle fiber grow. In his words â??logical progressionâ?? and â??layered trainingâ?? is how he has incorporated these different techniques in an intelligent program.

So to recap… Training is set up using 4 big ideaâ??s. In this layer approach exercise sequence makes a big difference, so follow the steps in order.
Remember to drive nutrients into the muscle. Next, get wild add some weight, and make sure to drive the concentric hard. Get your crazy pump on till you canâ??t hardly move, and then stretch the blood filled muscle using some resistance.

Some last quick comments were made on other key concepts.

Deloading: This should be done instinctively. No manual or book knows better than you when your body needs a break. John believes that volume should be dropped considerably but intensity should stay high.

Frequency of training: Use nutrition as the enabler to get recovery to a level, so you can train with more frequency.

Arms: With arms use pumping techniques (tempo)/supersets, etc.

Puking: Puking is not anabolic, and is not the call sign of a good workout, but hey if it happensâ?¦so be it.

To wrap up, John explained that the most important training variable is your level of PASSION. If you are passionate, you will push yourself hard, and always learn and get better. If you donâ??t have this passion, you will never come close to reaching your true potential. In my opinion these simple words need to be repeated so the meaning is not accidentally lost due to lack of sexiness…

I hope I was able to convey this in a way so that others can understand and maybe take advantage of this type of training.


#18

I’ve been working with Meadows for 3 weeks now. He is the best. End.


#19

[quote]View 1 wrote:

[quote]Maiden3.16 wrote:
"I long suspected that chains and bands could play a part in hypertrophy-based training, but the missing link has always been where and how often it should be used.

After working with John Meadows for over two years ? a serious bodybuilder who understands the science of hypertrophy training ? it’s all finally coming together.

We’re tossing ideas around and experimenting like crazy ? he the volume-driven bodybuilder, me the hardcore strength guy ? and what we’ve come up with will push his programming to a whole other level. And we’re going to share this with T Nation readers."

-Dave Tate

From the article posted today in case anyone missed it. Sounds pretty interesting, i’m exited.

[/quote]

This may be a little preview of what is to come ( taken from another forum ).

Mountain Dog training- Elitefts LTT5 Wrap up.

First off I would like to thank John Meadows for giving me the opportunity to share what I learned from his lecture this Friday at the Elitefts learn to train seminar. I was lucky enough to get to travel to London, Ohio and rub elbows with some of the strongest and smartest people on the planet. If you ever get the opportunity to see people of this caliber speak, and or corner them in a room somewhere and force them to converse with you, I highly suggest you do it. So without any further ado, here is some awesome information on training (and a little on nutrition).

Opening notes: Nutrition needs to match training, not a one dimensional thing. John did a quick rehash over his presentation at the last seminar around periworkout nutrition. John believes this is 80% of the battle nutritionally speaking, and again nutrition must match training style. They canâ??t be looked at two different variables.

We are in a war of muscular protein breakdown vs. Muscle protein synthesis.

-Supporting muscle protein synthesis creates more muscle, and more muscle = a leaner physique.

-We can prime the effect by minimizing muscle protein breakdown DURING training.

Pre-training nutrition- 30-60 minutes pre training: Some protein, moderate carbs, and a little fat to slow the release of the carbs so there is no issues with hypoglycemia.

Intra-workout nutrition: High molecular weight low osmalality carbs/protein hydrolysates.
Start sipping10-15 minutes before workout, then continue through workout.

Begin lecture on training: So four basic steps occur in the execution of a mountain dog workout. These steps have a side benefit of keeping you in one piece, so you also can do what you love (assuming you love to train) for a long time.

Step 1: Pump nutrient loaded blood into pre-activated muscle.
Usually done with dumbells or some type of machine… This exercise should not be hard on the joints at all, but does not have to be isolation work either. Itâ??s not pure pre-exhaustion. Itâ??s starting the delivery of those nutrients in the intra drink to muscle, and also filling the muscle full of blood so muscle are primed for the next phase.

Funny note â?? he had a picture of Galactus representing this step.

Step 2: Activate/stimulate fast twitch fibers while in reactive pump state.
This step involves using a moderately heavy weight in an explosive concentric manner. The heavy weight and acceleration are there to activate as much tissue as possible.
Rep range here usually falls in the 5-6 range. The more force you can generate, the more you can engage high threshold motor units. Using accommodating resistance, especially chains, seem to prime this affect.

He had a picture of Colossus representing this step.

Step 3: Induce supra-maximal pump volume- Think fire, skin splitting, throbbing, cant put your limbs in any type of normal position type feeling.
A good way to do this is by slowing down the eccentric tempo.

John went through explanation of myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic hypertrophy here, explaining that one is not better than other, both fully maxed are the best. This step probably develops muscles though creating more volumous cells (sarcoplasmic hypertrophy), not necessarily by adding sarcomeres in a fiber (myofibrillar hypertrophy, which is what the heavier weight will do on Step 2).

He had a picture of the human torch representing this step. Burn baby burn.

Step 4: Load and stretch a pumped muscle.
Increased recovery is one benefit of this type of loaded stretching at the end of the workout. Whether hyperplasia occurs is very debatable, despite the bird hanging upside down study done years back.

He had a picture of Mr Fantastic to represent this step.

Johnâ??s programming uses many different approaches to make a muscle fiber grow. In his words â??logical progressionâ?? and â??layered trainingâ?? is how he has incorporated these different techniques in an intelligent program.

So to recap… Training is set up using 4 big ideaâ??s. In this layer approach exercise sequence makes a big difference, so follow the steps in order.
Remember to drive nutrients into the muscle. Next, get wild add some weight, and make sure to drive the concentric hard. Get your crazy pump on till you canâ??t hardly move, and then stretch the blood filled muscle using some resistance.

Some last quick comments were made on other key concepts.

Deloading: This should be done instinctively. No manual or book knows better than you when your body needs a break. John believes that volume should be dropped considerably but intensity should stay high.

Frequency of training: Use nutrition as the enabler to get recovery to a level, so you can train with more frequency.

Arms: With arms use pumping techniques (tempo)/supersets, etc.

Puking: Puking is not anabolic, and is not the call sign of a good workout, but hey if it happensâ?¦so be it.

To wrap up, John explained that the most important training variable is your level of PASSION. If you are passionate, you will push yourself hard, and always learn and get better. If you donâ??t have this passion, you will never come close to reaching your true potential. In my opinion these simple words need to be repeated so the meaning is not accidentally lost due to lack of sexiness…

I hope I was able to convey this in a way so that others can understand and maybe take advantage of this type of training.[/quote]

Great info. I wonder if there was anything revolutionary mentioned in regards to post workout nutrition?


#20

While I really enjoy his articles (particularly about nutrition, hormones, digestion, etc.), most of his training methods are hardly novel. His training for the most part consists of standard, time-tested bodybuilding methods. No doubt they are well-thought out and certainly everyone can pick a new idea here and there, but in the end they shouldn’t be a revelation.

The only real intriguing part in my opinion is that he proposes to systematically use (basic) periodization for the goal of bodybuilding. This is not many suggest or use for BBing I think.

I think he especially stands out here on TN, because most of the recent articles where not written for and by actual bodybuilders.

That being said, I’m sure that probably everyone will make great progress if they hire him. Hell, if Shelby believes in his programs, I do too.