T Nation

More Books!

This site has been an excellent resourse for reading material. There have been other posts involving book suggestions that have lead me to some great reading. Some were classics I hadn’t considered reading while others were more contemporary. (Fight Club)!

I’d like to ask for a few more suggestions for some recently published books that would appeal to T-Nation members.

Thanks in advance.

NO B.S. Time Management For Entrepreneurs

by Dan Kennedy

This is one of the few books I’ve read where I really felt like I was discovering new concepts that I could immediately use.

Fantastic by Laurence Leamer - an Arnold Schwarzenegger biography, probably the definitive one. The author did a great job and got major access to people close to Arnold.

The last good book I read was Kite Runner

My Book About Me.
Great central character.

I just finished The Yiddish Policeman’s Union by Michael Chabon. Excellent.

And the new Palahnuik book (Rant) leaves something to be desired, but its still the best thing he’s written since Choke.

Recent things:
Economic Fact & Fallacies - Thomas Sowell
Liberal Fascism - Jonah Goldberg (an absolute must-read)

And everyone should have a copy of Gracian’s “The Art of Worldly Wisdom” thought it certainly doesn’t qualify as a recent publication.

Anything by Irvine Welsh (guy who wrote Trainspotting)
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
The Naked and the Dead

[quote]pittbulll wrote:
The last good book I read was Kite Runner [/quote]

I hated that book so much, couldn’t get past page 150.

Currently working on An Army at Dawn about the US Army’s campaign in North Africa 1942-43. Really excellent.

Unintended Consequences - John Ross

His Excellency, George Washington - Joseph Ellis

Yamasee War : A Study of Culture, Economy, and Conflict in the Colonial South - William Ramsey (I havent’ read this yet since it isn’t out until May, but it’s written by the closest thing to a role model I have had as an adult. He’s my former Colonial American History prof and he’s really locked on.)

Economics in One Lesson - Henry Hazlitt

mike

[quote]BackForMore wrote:
Recent things:
Economic Fact & Fallacies - Thomas Sowell
Liberal Fascism - Jonah Goldberg (an absolute must-read)

And everyone should have a copy of Gracian’s “The Art of Worldly Wisdom” thought it certainly doesn’t qualify as a recent publication.[/quote]

Thomas Sowell is a smart cat and a decent author. I have yet to read one of his books where I did not learn something of significant value. I will have my local librarian find me that book.

I am currently reading “The Forgotten Man” by Amity Shlaes. The author makes a pretty convincing argument that FDR’s policies were not really necessary and that they ultimately prolonged the depression. Sounds rather dry, but the book is actually pretty entertaining. If you like history, you would probably like this book.

I just read Cormac McCarthy’s “The Road”. Compared to his other stuff (which rocks), it sucked. If someone offers it to you, run away. Run away fast.

[quote]VanderLaan wrote:

I just read Cormac McCarthy’s “The Road”. Compared to his other stuff (which rocks), it sucked. If someone offers it to you, run away. Run away fast.
[/quote]

Really? I’d highly recommend The Road.

mike

[quote]Mikeyali wrote:
VanderLaan wrote:

I just read Cormac McCarthy’s “The Road”. Compared to his other stuff (which rocks), it sucked. If someone offers it to you, run away. Run away fast.

Really? I’d highly recommend The Road.

mike[/quote]

I liked it, and it only took like 2 hours to read, so it’s not like you’re investing a lot of time in it.

[quote]Uncle Gabby wrote:
Mikeyali wrote:
VanderLaan wrote:

I just read Cormac McCarthy’s “The Road”. Compared to his other stuff (which rocks), it sucked. If someone offers it to you, run away. Run away fast.

Really? I’d highly recommend The Road.

mike

I liked it, and it only took like 2 hours to read, so it’s not like you’re investing a lot of time in it.[/quote]

I am a fan of McCarthy’s work. The border trilogy and No Country were great. Compared to the rest of his books, I thought The Road was depressing and rather pointless. I mean, the story was basically: Apocalypse occurs. Father and son decide to walk south for warmer weather. Look for food. Walk some more. Cough up blood due to ash. Look for food. Walk some more. Hide from cannibals. Walk some more. Almost die from starvation. Find food at the last minute (surprise!). Walk some more. Cough up more blood due to ash. Walk some more…

I would recommend many of his other works before this one.

[quote]Uncle Gabby wrote:
pittbulll wrote:
The last good book I read was Kite Runner

I hated that book so much, couldn’t get past page 150.

Currently working on An Army at Dawn about the US Army’s campaign in North Africa 1942-43. Really excellent.[/quote]

I hated the aurthor until he redeamed himself

[quote]Uncle Gabby wrote:
pittbulll wrote:
The last good book I read was Kite Runner

I hated that book so much, couldn’t get past page 150.

Currently working on An Army at Dawn about the US Army’s campaign in North Africa 1942-43. Really excellent.[/quote]

Foot soldier by Roy Blunt was awsome as well

Book of Knots

Everyone should learn how to tie knots

[quote]pittbulll wrote:
I hated the aurthor until he redeamed himself [/quote]

I figured he would but just couldn’t wade through any more self-loathing to get to that point. It’s not so much that he was a coward that bothered me, just that he wouldn’t shut the fuck up about how he felt. Ok, you hate yourself for what you did, I get it already.

The sword of fire and Ice series, god it kicks ass everyone should start it.

Panzer Commander

Just read it for history class. It was awesome.

The Diary of Jack the Ripper (real or not, I liked it)
The House on the Borderland (fiction)
The Island - Benchley (fiction)
Eight Million Ways to Die (fiction)
Marathon Man (fiction)
A Rumor of War (nonfiction)
Famous Curses (nonfiction)
Travels - Crichton (nonfiction)
Concrete Mama: Prison Profiles from Walla Walla (nonfiction)