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MobilityWOD: Short Term Fix?


#1

Is the stuff that MobilitWOD does with band distractions designed for you to do just before squatting so you can breifly get more mobility to squat deeper, then you're back to normal mobility levels after your workout - or does it lead to lasting gains in mobility?

Has anyone had permanent gains in mobility as a result of doing that stuff?


#2

All mobility (be it band distractions, static passive stretching, active stretching, PNF, Rolfing, deep tissue massage, etc…) is provides “acute” increases in flexibility. What makes for long term gains is repeatedly performing those exercises over long periods of time. Just like with everything else fitness related, the body is an adaptive organism and will adapt to whatever you expose it to. If you expose it to a progressively greater range of motion then it will adapt to that. If you expose it to an increasingly lesser range of motion it’ll adapt to that. It’s really very simple; sometimes long, tedious, slower than you want, and not always easy, but simple nonetheless.


#3

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
All mobility (be it band distractions, static passive stretching, active stretching, PNF, Rolfing, deep tissue massage, etc…) is provides “acute” increases in flexibility. What makes for long term gains is repeatedly performing those exercises over long periods of time. Just like with everything else fitness related, the body is an adaptive organism and will adapt to whatever you expose it to. If you expose it to a progressively greater range of motion then it will adapt to that. If you expose it to an increasingly lesser range of motion it’ll adapt to that. It’s really very simple; sometimes long, tedious, slower than you want, and not always easy, but simple nonetheless.[/quote]

How long is a ‘long period of time’ though? Decades?

Because I’ve been holding some of these stretches consistently every day for at least 2 minutes per side per day, for at least a year, some coming up to two years now, and have experienced no gains in flexibility or mobility. Same with the foam rolling and mobility drills: I can tell you that lack of dedication or consistency on my part has not been the issue.


#4

[quote]lunk wrote:

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
All mobility (be it band distractions, static passive stretching, active stretching, PNF, Rolfing, deep tissue massage, etc…) is provides “acute” increases in flexibility. What makes for long term gains is repeatedly performing those exercises over long periods of time. Just like with everything else fitness related, the body is an adaptive organism and will adapt to whatever you expose it to. If you expose it to a progressively greater range of motion then it will adapt to that. If you expose it to an increasingly lesser range of motion it’ll adapt to that. It’s really very simple; sometimes long, tedious, slower than you want, and not always easy, but simple nonetheless.[/quote]

How long is a ‘long period of time’ though? Decades?

Because I’ve been holding some of these stretches consistently every day for at least 2 minutes per side per day, for at least a year, some coming up to two years now, and have experienced no gains in flexibility or mobility. Same with the foam rolling and mobility drills: I can tell you that lack of dedication or consistency on my part has not been the issue.[/quote]

Then you are doing them wrong or have the wrong attitude while doing them. Stretching is about teaching your body to relax at greater and greater ranges of motion. You can use “enhancement techniques” like reciprocal inhibition, PNF, or myofascial release to speed up the process, but ultimately that’s what it’s about. You also seem to be someone who is bordering on learned helplessness (you seem to believe that you are doomed to never succeed) and you seem to suffer from paralysis by analysis.

For the next week I want you to stretch with the idea in mind that:
“Static stretching is effective”
“You are flexible and your muscles can elongate naturally”
“The initial tightness you feel when you perform a stretch is not your actual range of motion, but only how far you have become accustomed to moving that joint/muscle”
“When you feel tightness in a muscle during a stretch you job is to relax that muscle and then move into a deeper stretch”
“Approach stretching like you would have when you were young and supple and didn’t fear hurting yourself or need to guard against your muscles stretching”

Obviously there will be an actual limit to how far you are going to be able to do this on any given day, but if you do this every day you should see improvement after a week of this. No, you probably won’t be dropping down into the splits or standing back bends, but you should see improvement nonetheless.


#5

Sento is right.

Everyone doing yoga for 3 months does improve.
Not improving might come from
" the wrong attitude while doing them "
Sometimes we are the problem.
Maybe you are in a personal relationship or work situation that is very stressfull and you are " enjoying the result".
I do understand that there is no joy but i meant the fruits that you are getting will keep on coming.
You want new different fruits you might be more successfull moving on and be able to pick from different trees.
Keep doing the same, hope for new results is insan…
You are closed, experiencing fear, breating deeply will help you to open and evolve.
Any librairy offers books about relaxation, deep breathing, yoga, dvd, any search on youtube will offer videos.
All the best !


#6

This is not how you fix movement. Neither is yoga. There are plenty of people that do alot of yoga that have horrible mobility.

It’s not that hard to have great mobility and stability. The more complicated it is and the more time it takes the less important it is as a general rule.


#7

[quote]Shadowzz4 wrote:
This is not how you fix movement. Neither is yoga. There are plenty of people that do alot of yoga that have horrible mobility.
[/quote]

Define “do lots of Yoga”, because literally every single person that I have known (including some initially very inflexible individuals) that has started diligently doing Yoga have dramatically improved their flexibility. If you mean that they go to Yoga class 1-2 times a week, then yeah, they may not.


#8

Yes. My point is exactly that flexibility is overrated. Everyone is trying to gain flexibility. Most have stability problems.


#9

[quote]Shadowzz4 wrote:
Yes. My point is exactly that flexibility is overrated. Everyone is trying to gain flexibility. Most have stability problems.
[/quote]

Most have issues with both IME, and encouraging people fix their stability issues is all well and good. Telling people that fixing their flexibility issues is a waste of time is what I take issue with, especially when the OP specifically asked about it.


#10

Most people mistake their lack of stability for flexibility problems. That’s why so many people have “flexibility” problems.


#11

[quote]Shadowzz4 wrote:
Most people mistake their lack of stability for flexibility problems. That’s why so many people have “flexibility” problems.[/quote]

That’s a bit of an over-generalization. Yes, in some cases a lack of mobility is due to a lack of stability, but this is hardly the case in all instances. Generally if there is adequate passive mobility but inadequate active mobility or mobility under load, then yes, stability is the likely cause. If there is a lack of passive flexibility though, then flexibility needs to be addressed along with stability. IME lots of people lack adequate passive flexibility and thus require stretching.