T Nation

MMA + Lifting

I’m sure there are plenty of articles out there that suggest workouts centered around MMA training. Currently, I’m doing the HSS-100, but I’m going to start MMA training again soon and I know my body won’t be able to handle that kind of load. Could anyone suggest another program where I could still receive hypertrophy and strength gains?

Thanks a lot,

Vince

Couple questions so people will be able to help you out:

What are you doing as far as mma? How many times per week? etc.

How long have you been strength training and what are your numbers?

What is your current weight?

What are your goal numbers and goal body weight?

Do you plan on fighting pro one day or just want to get some time on the mat?

Which is more important, looking big and strong and like you can kick some ass or actually being able to kick some ass? Or both?

I like to circuit train and use oly lifts mixed with other core lifts like chins and ring work. gymnastics is good cross training too.

-chris

I know a lot of people don’t like it but i have found a modified crossfit style has worked well for me. My body seems to recover well from it.

You should not lift more than twice a week.
Your sessions have to be brief, don’t go to failure or you will never be able to fully recover from your MMA and conditionning workouts.
Focus on strongman stuff and odd lifts(farmer walk, sandbag exercices, rope climbing) and perform your exercices in a circuit fashion.

For some ideas, run a search and you’ll see a bunch of threads discussing this topic. Opinions definitely vary.

I’ll say this from personal experience. I train BJJ and Muay Thai. I have no aspirations to compete in MMA, I just enjoy the training. I’ve found that if I lift more than 2 times a week, my body has a harder time recovering. So, I lift 2 times a week, do some endurance work (look for the 7 Conditioning Secrets for Combat Athletes to get an idea for exercises to do) 2-3 times a week and train BJJ/Muay Thai 2-3 times a week.

[quote]Djwlfpack wrote:
For some ideas, run a search and you’ll see a bunch of threads discussing this topic. Opinions definitely vary.

I’ll say this from personal experience. I train BJJ and Muay Thai. I have no aspirations to compete in MMA, I just enjoy the training. I’ve found that if I lift more than 2 times a week, my body has a harder time recovering. So, I lift 2 times a week, do some endurance work (look for the 7 Conditioning Secrets for Combat Athletes to get an idea for exercises to do) 2-3 times a week and train BJJ/Muay Thai 2-3 times a week.[/quote]

this is good advice. I have noticed a drain if I train more than 2x weekly and keep up hard BJJ/MT.

Gymnastics doesn’t seem to create this drain and that’s why I like to train it. Oly lifting within 90% of my 1rm does though. I can never feel muscle soreness but I can easily feel neuro-muscularly drained.

-chris

I agree. I can never lift more than 2x/week with BJJ/MMA training.
A typical week for me.

Mon AM - 20 minute HIIT bicycling session (2 min easy/2 min hard)
Flexibility/Mobility/foam roller/swiss ball feel good stuff
PM - lifting - some oly lifts, neck, grip, isometrics

Tues AM - High Octane Cardio hitting heavy bag
PM- BJJ Class

Wed AM - Flexibility/Mobility/feel good stuff
PM- MMA- Class

Thurs AM Flexibility/Mobility/feel good stuff
PM - BJJ-Class

Fri - No Gi Grappling Circuit from Juan Carlos - Flexibility/Mobility/feel good stuff

Sat - Lift - Flexibility/Mobility/feel good stuff

Sun - Nothing

I would say you should seriously look into kettlebell training. Find a certified kettlebell instructor and discuss your goals with him. He can design a program for your needs. Kettlebells allow for trmendous gains in strength while maintaining greater flexibility and power through that range of motion. They flat out make you tough as nails.

go to: dragondoor.com

for all your kettlebell info

[quote]Blemming wrote:
I’m sure there are plenty of articles out there that suggest workouts centered around MMA training. Currently, I’m doing the HSS-100, but I’m going to start MMA training again soon and I know my body won’t be able to handle that kind of load. Could anyone suggest another program where I could still receive hypertrophy and strength gains?

Thanks a lot,

Vince[/quote]

Have you read Hammer Down Strength? It consists of two total body workouts per week that will build all the strength and size you’ll ever need.

You can find it here:
http://www.T-Nation.com/findArticle.do?article=06-067-training

I am gonna go against the grain, I lift 7 days a week and and do skills training 7 days a week, but my training is completely intergrated, my skill, conditioning, and strenght training is all done together, and my total volume of work is very carefully controlled so I don’t burn out.

I have gained alot of strenght this way but not alot in the way of size about 5-7 lbs of quality mass a year, but what it really has done is improve my prefomance

do lots of squats, deadlifts, clean and jerks, chin ups, leg presses and ab work.

try taking an advanced yoga class a few times a week. it sounds ridiculous, but isometric excercises are just as important as explosive strength when grappling.

for cardio, do two days of sprints followed by a long distance day.

mix it up. run bleachers, pull a sled, try some isometrics…

eat healthy and a lot to maintain your energy levels. lots of greens, fruits, lean chicken, fish, some beef, mixed nuts, fat free cottage cheese…

don’t worry too much about supplements unless they are just protien powders, fish oil pills or other nutrients that you’d find in food anyways.

forget about fat burners, “energy boosters” etc. let your body develop itself naturally through proper training and diet and you will remain more consistent for competition.

you may have to put body building to the side for the time you are training in mma. it is a very intense sport and to be truly competitive, you need to work very hard on sport specific movements, compound lifts and cardio, which may sacrifice how pretty your biceps and ass look.

when i was competing, i found that with lots of physical training i could beat people much more skilled than i by just fighting defensively, possibly losing a round and letting them get tired. once tired, skill is worthless. it was easy to move in on a tired guy, regardless of how hard he could punch or how skillfully he could grapple when he was fresh.

You may also want to check out Ross Enamait’s site at www.rosstraining.com

If you’re relatively serious about MMA get “Building the Ultimate MMA athlete” from the Diesel Crew

I’ll write a review on it tonight after I get a few guys from my gym to try out some of its drills.