T Nation

MLB and Supplements

My brother is a minor league baseball player in the San Francisco Giants organization. This past weekend they had to report for a conditioning camp that lasted about 5 days.
I talked to him last night (Sunday) and they had just got done with their first day of the camp.
He told me what their day consisted of and said that at one time during the day the trainers addressed supplements. Of coures this caught my interest and I asked him to tell me more.
He said that basically they told everybody to not take chances with any supplements and just focus on eating right. They said that even supplements like protein powders could put guys at risk for a failing a steroid test.
They felt that because there are too many companies peddling bad products and it isn’t worth the chance of ingesting a substance that wasn’t listed on the label. The trainers then went on to tell the players that some companies are doing this so that consumers will notice gains and come back to purchase more of their product.
I thought about this for a while last night and I am curious to see how other T-nation members feel about this.
Do you think this is an overreaction by an organization feeling the effects of a highly publicized steroid scandal? Or do you think the organization is giving sound advice and looking out for the best interest of its players?

Are there unscrupulous supplement companies? Yes! Are the trainers over reacting? Yes!

A diet that is centered around whole natural foods is always the way to go. When there is a need to supplement
a good way to make sure that you get a quality protein powder is to buy Grow! protein from BIOTEST. Can’t beat the taste or the price either.

I think the organization is overreacting because MLB and Congress and the media are overreacting. I mean protein powder is probably on the next list of banned supplements. I’m still mystified as how steroids give an unfair advantage in a skill sport. Steroids are not responsible for Bonds being one of the most efficient hitters in the game–practice is. But, yeah, in this environment the team has to look out for the players (or risk loosing them to suspensions). It’s absurd, but blame your lawmakers and an American public that doesn’t understand the first thing about science, nor what the physical demands of professional sports actually entail. Yeah, its cool for a variety of compounds (including hormones and hormone mimics) to enter the food chain via livestock and agriculture and to not tell anyone what they’re ingesting, but it is a major crime and unfair advantage if anyone wants to control what goes in and its effects. And I’ll just ignore the fact that the steroid hitters like McGuire, Bonds and Sosa are the very guys who helped boost MLBs ratings. No one wants to watch singles and doubles (other than the purists and there is no money in catering to purists).

IMO the team trainers are simply over reacting because of what is going on lately. I mean whey is NOT a steriod and I do not see how a company coul put any sort of steriod in a whey powder. I agree that a healthy diet is still the number one thing you should be concentrating on, but supplemnts do help out…especially when it comes down to getting X grams of protein a day.

just stay away from the clear and cream!

(right Barry? Oh my bad, you thought it was Flax oil. Right.)

Stay away from Flax Oil! STEEERRRIODSS!

Losers.

The trainers are talking bullshit. Tell your brother to get his diet in order, then tell him to take all the supplements he wants, with the exception of prohormone products which could possibly raise his t-levels too much. But even that is HIGHLY unlikely.
He should be on protein powders, vitamins, flaxseed oil and creatine at a bare minimum, and if he has more of a budget, throw in ZMA, thermogenics if he wants to lose weight or for the odd boost before training, glutamine (though its efficacy is a matter of huge debate) and tribulus.
Baseball is a skill sport- but power and speed come second. I would be doing all in my power to reach peak physical status if I were him.

[quote]rg73 wrote:
I think the organization is overreacting because MLB and Congress and the media are overreacting. I mean protein powder is probably on the next list of banned supplements. I’m still mystified as how steroids give an unfair advantage in a skill sport. Steroids are not responsible for Bonds being one of the most efficient hitters in the game–practice is. But, yeah, in this environment the team has to look out for the players (or risk loosing them to suspensions). It’s absurd, but blame your lawmakers and an American public that doesn’t understand the first thing about science, nor what the physical demands of professional sports actually entail. Yeah, its cool for a variety of compounds (including hormones and hormone mimics) to enter the food chain via livestock and agriculture and to not tell anyone what they’re ingesting, but it is a major crime and unfair advantage if anyone wants to control what goes in and its effects. And I’ll just ignore the fact that the steroid hitters like McGuire, Bonds and Sosa are the very guys who helped boost MLBs ratings. No one wants to watch singles and doubles (other than the purists and there is no money in catering to purists).[/quote]

rg73,
You make some good points here. Like you said it makes no sense for the government to freak out about hormone supplements when the animals we consume are pumped full of them.
Along those same lines prohormones aren’t even near as abused or have negatively affected as many lives as drugs like alcohol or tobacco.
Back to the initial point of the thread though, I guess the Giants organization is just worried about covering its ass and would rather just eliminate all possibilities of some uneducated moron buying a bad product.

[quote]deanosumo wrote:

Baseball is a skill sport- but power and speed come second. I would be doing all in my power to reach peak physical status if I were him. [/quote]

Well, you have more time to react if you get freakishly strong, and I also heard steroids can affect reaction time, though I don’t really know about that. If you can move a 38oz bat like a twig, it will come down to skill, but strength will limit guys. But I could hit homeruns and my arms aren’t any bigger than an average bat, either…