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Mixing Oil & Water Injectibles?

A friend of mine just purchased a vail of stanozolol and a vail of boldenone. The type of stanozolol he bought tends to be extremely painful to inject, due probably to the high alcohol content.

My question is can he mix the water and the oil based injectibles together in the same syringe in an attempt to dilute the alcohol and bring comfort to the cycle?

I’ve read articles about people doing this, but I’ve never tried it. My friend’s a newbie, so I’d like to find out so he won’t end up stopping his cycle short due to intolerable injection pain.

I would never mix oil and water in the same syringe.

You can take the injectable winny orally. People do it all the time.

Sure, why not? Mix it up good and keep control of the plunger as water shoots much faster than oil and if you are shooting the oil part and you get a pocket of water its going to go much faster at that point.

Now we all know that oil and water don’t mix, but to think that it forms some magical force field in your muscle and won’t get absorbed is kind of silly - it will absorb into your body just the same. I’ve heard such things as it encapsulates itself and won’t absorb into the muscle…??? Would that happen in the stomach too? Or what if blood, which is mostly water, go mixed with the oil at the injection site???

[quote]TheBeat wrote:
Sure, why not? Mix it up good and keep control of the plunger as water shoots much faster than oil and if you are shooting the oil part and you get a pocket of water its going to go much faster at that point.

Now we all know that oil and water don’t mix, but to think that it forms some magical force field in your muscle and won’t get absorbed is kind of silly - it will absorb into your body just the same. I’ve heard such things as it encapsulates itself and won’t absorb into the muscle…??? Would that happen in the stomach too? Or what if blood, which is mostly water, go mixed with the oil at the injection site???
[/quote]

Very bad advice.

Just a quick anatomy lesson: the stomach is a far cry from muscle tissue.

This post is the very reason that I think there needs to be a minimum IQ before allowing anyone to even discuss AAS.

I think that after making such an insulting remark that you better back up your ignorance. I always find you to be one of the most informative people of this board - but in this case you are WRONG! I do not understand why you would make a stab at my IQ.

Lets see something to back up your statement Rainjack! I mentioned the stomach as well as blood at the injection site, but you failed to quote that. If common sense has anything to do with IQ then maybe you should be questioning your place here not mine.

[quote]TheBeat wrote:
I think that after making such an insulting remark that you better back up your ignorance. I always find you to be one of the most informative people of this board - but in this case you are WRONG! I do not understand why you would make a stab at my IQ.

Lets see something to back up your statement Rainjack! I mentioned the stomach as well as blood at the injection site, but you failed to quote that. If common sense has anything to do with IQ then maybe you should be questioning your place here not mine.
[/quote]

Not trying to insult, but you need to do more than ask me to prove your point.

Anyhow -

I worked in the feedlot business for several years. I asked the vet why we didn’t mix out water based injections with oil-based injections in the same syringe to save the number of holes we poke in the cattle.

He told me that if oil and water dont mix outside the body, how in the hell do you expect it to mis inside the body. I didn’t believe him, and mixed a water based antibiotic with an oil-based.

The steer developed the nastiest absess I have ever seen on an animal.

That’s my proof. The word of a veterinarian, and the experience of a fool.

Now your turn. Tell me how many times you have injected oil and water in the same syringe.

Rainjack,

Do you realize how unlikely your story sounds? An abscess is usually a buildup of bacteria, a zit if you will. And you say this came with a shot of ANTIBIOTIC? It sounds very unlikely.

I like your advice though, I don’t know why but I would never shoot oil and water. It just sounds dumb. :slight_smile:

[quote]Diana Bolann wrote:
Rainjack,

Do you realize how unlikely your story sounds? An abscess is usually a buildup of bacteria, a zit if you will. And you say this came with a shot of ANTIBIOTIC? It sounds very unlikely.

I like your advice though, I don’t know why but I would never shoot oil and water. It just sounds dumb. :)[/quote]

An absess can occur even when the injection is nothing but antibiotics. I know. I have seen it happen, and have drained hundreds of them.

An abssess can occur anytime the body thinks it has identified an outsider. In my experience, about 90% of the abscesses are non-bacterial. In other words, I have drained far more grape juice than I have cottage cheese.

First, I have injected Oil and Water in the same syringe probably around 5-10 times.

Second, my dad is a veterinarian who owns his own practice and use to specialize in large animal husbandry (you should know that one). I grew up on a ranch with many horses and other animals. He says he sees nothing wrong with it as far as absorbtion, might mess with the displacement timing and is not standard practice for reasons of injection volume and possibility of absorbtion timing problems, but physically nothing wrong and that abscesses are from bacteria and foreign particles not from sterile oil or water.

Third, Two of my brothers are RN’s - and not one of them tell me that there is a problem with it as far as abscesses.

forth, does it really matter if they mix within the body, we are merely injecting it into the muscle to be displaced.

Do you really think that the injection that you gave was the cause of the abscess? If so, what part, the oil or the water? Did the oil cause the abscess because the water was displace faster and the body said “I just absorbed some water, I am not going to absorb that oil” or did the water somehow get trapped inside the oil (as so many say) and the body said “I’m not going to absorb that oil, there’s something inside of it, I’m scared!” If somehow the oil and the water were able to be absorbed, BUT were capable of causing abscesses due to not being absorbed, then couldn’t oil and water within the body also cause strokes and other blockage problems, or is it just muscle that cannot deal with different Viscosities?

I do not mean to be a ‘smart-ass’ or take personal stabs at anyone. I just ask everyone to really think about this, because it is one of those bodybuilding myths that just keeps getting passed around without any logical reason.

RJ’s observation and experience notwithstanding, it makes sense that a large muscle of the body could handle an oil-water mix just fine.

Even if the two were mixed thoroughly, they would still remain separated (as the hydrophobic oil forms micelles or droplets). Just like when you add olive oil to your shakes or the bottle of Newman’s Olive Oil and Vinegar dressing on my fridge.

And upon reaching the muscle, the water-soluble winny would absorbed rapidly while the oil droplets get left behind to be absorbed more slowly. So no big deal at all, in theory anyway.

I do think about it, and err on the side of caution. If you want to mix oil and water, go ahead. I think it is bad advice, and I have no reservations about saying so.

You shouldn’t have any problems. Rainjack’s just being an ass

It’s only bad advice if I’m wrong.

It’s a good thing to not have reservations about saying things to help people out, but when you are wrong or have figured it out maybe you should. and if ANYONE still questions or wanders about this subject - look it up, don’t just take my word for it… or Rainjacks if that makes sense to you.

[quote]JonP wrote:
You shouldn’t have any problems. Rainjack’s just being an ass[/quote]

Why am I being an ass? at least 95% of the advice I give here is spot on.

I’d take what I say with far more credibility than someone that has yet to give any advice whatsoever.

I’d say you are the ass in this particular situation.

[quote]TheBeat wrote:
It’s only bad advice if I’m wrong.

It’s a good thing to not have reservations about saying things to help people out, but when you are wrong or have figured it out maybe you should. and if ANYONE still questions or wanders about this subject - look it up, don’t just take my word for it… or Rainjacks if that makes sense to you.
[/quote]

This is where we differ. You have no problems taking risks with your body. I do.

The decision is very simple. Take the risk, or don’t. After 800 injections without an abscess - I think I have a little room to talk here.

[quote]rainjack wrote:
TheBeat wrote:
It’s only bad advice if I’m wrong.

It’s a good thing to not have reservations about saying things to help people out, but when you are wrong or have figured it out maybe you should. and if ANYONE still questions or wanders about this subject - look it up, don’t just take my word for it… or Rainjacks if that makes sense to you.

This is where we differ. You have no problems taking risks with your body. I do.

The decision is very simple. Take the risk, or don’t. After 800 injections without an abscess - I think I have a little room to talk here. [/quote]

I see where you are coming from now.

I do not see it as taking risks with my body as I understand the absorbtion and displacement of it. If I questioned it or did not understand then it would be a risk. Where you are coming from with not understanding, you are giving excellent advice as far as caution and I applaud that.

I have around 300 injections without an abscess if that matters. I think we are both doing well with our injection technique. As far as the oil and water debate however, I feel it’s no different than debating if Test and Deca can be put in the same syringe.

benchaffleck, listen to rainjack. Hes a veteran for information, and knows his stuff. Most these guys talkin him down and sayin he’s wrong know half what he does. while water and oil in the same vile wont clog a syringe, it isnt a good idea.

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:
By Zeus’ left testicle, what a lot of argument over a simple topic!

It is (IMO) FINE to mix MOST oil and water-based hormones within the same shot.

In my 1000 shot plus career (how bizarre does that sound?), I have mixed either HCG and oil-based gear, OR Zambon stanozolol and oil-based gear, maybe 100 times.

Apart from the obvious viscosity-induced flow rate variance, I see and have experienced ZERO negative effects from this practice.

And whilst I appreciate RJ saying that he advises against it, because it poses greater (and unnecessary) risk. My education into histopathology and other stuff has NOT lead me to any other conclusions than those which initially lead me down the path of including oil and water in one syringe.

Of course oil and water don’t mix either inside or outside the body. With all due respect to RJs vet friend. HOW is this relevant? It isn’t. The oil based gear and the water based gear may interact in some trivial, and essentially benign way to mildly affect the dispersal rates of each other, but the effects will be insignificant, I feel.

However I will add one caveat. I speak from experience of using certain proven combinations. IF you use certain drugs that interact with each other biochemically whilst in the syringe, i.e. they are incompatible for some reason, then YES, you could end up with some problems, or not…

A case in point - combining IGF1 and insulin in the same shot is not a good idea, because the acidity of the IGF1 ‘keeper solution’ (the acetic acid soln.) may dissociate the insulin peptide into something useless.

I’ve seen this with my own eyes when the 6iu of insulin turned into a semi-solid, cloudy ‘plug’ in the barel, upon inclusion of 40mcg of IGF1…!

For those non-feedstock/animal husbandry/RN/medical people amongst us, the difference between ‘cottage cheese’ and ‘grape juice’ that RJ refers to, is the organism that caused the infection. ‘Cottage cheese’ is usually caused by the organism mycobacterium bovis, mycobacterium tuberculosis and others.

This is called ‘caseous necrosis’. ‘Grape juice’ on the other hand, is caused by different bacteria or fungal infections, causing a different immune response within the body, and is usually referred to as ‘liquefactive necrosis’.

Neither have anything to do with oil/water mix injections as far as I can gather from the texts, or from the application of logic.

Infected abscesses form, or do not form, based upon contamination, not based upon whether the shot contains a mix of oil and water.

bushy[/quote]

It’s all about trying to avoid an abscess. You take no unnecessary risks with the cattle in an effort to avoid IM abscesses. The resoning for this should be quite obvious.

An old-school feedlot veterinarian is not going to cite chapter and verse clinical reasons for not mixing injections. They tend to speak in common sense rather than, “look at me I read a book”-ese.

As for the abscess reference - the guy wanted to know how there could be an abscess while injecting antibiotics. Cottage cheese is a sign of necrosis and/or infection. Grape juice is a sign of a sterile abscess. But injecting syringe full of antibiotics can cause just as big an abscess as anything out there.

My opposition to mixing does not have a damn thing to do with absorption. It is all about what kind of trauma you are causing at the injection site.

I find it funny that you laugh about the discussion in this thread, and then you proceed to launch into the longest post so far.

For what it’s worth, I am currently half way through my 8 week Winny/Tren cycle. I have been mixing 50Mg of Winny and 75Mg of Tren EOD with no issues at all. If anything changes, I will keep everyone posted.