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Missed 3rd Squat because I Propelled the Bar Off my Back After Completing the Lift


#1

I did my third meet today, went 6/9 at a USPA meet in the raw 198s. Can y'all look at my third attempt (435lbs) and tell me what I could have done to prevent it from happening the way it did? I got it up all the way and at the top it rose off my body, came back down differently and forced me out under forward.


#2

Close hand placement might have done it. What kind of grip were you using thumbless or normal? I really feel if you widen your hands slightly you'd have more control


#3

Thumbless. For a month after my previous meet squats above 255 gave me intense wrist pain which is what caused me to switch from thumbs around to thumbless and it cleared away all the pain instantly. I'll experiment with a wider grip, thanks!


#4

Have you ever thought of leaning forward a bit more? Seems to me like you got too excited and stood too upright. Is this a common issue you seem to face regularly? It could very well be a one time thing.


#5

It's not too common of an issue for me in training. Occassionally 315 will bounce off slightly, maybe 2 reps out of an entire month. It definitely could have been excitement, that was a weight I was surprised to have gotten back up with. I'll experiment with more forward lean and see how that feels, thanks!

Edit: I have never ever had the bar fall backward off that like me before, what I was referring to before happening occasionally was the bar itself rising off my shoulder shelf very briefly.


#6

If you ask me, I'd say it's really a matter of how you squat. For me personally, I like pulling the bar down into me as it feels extremely tight and compact. I do know of other people who like pushing up against the bar whilst ascending on the squat, maybe the weight is just too like for you?


#7

IMO, you should have picked a heavier third. Was this attempt a missed and repeated second?


#8

You lost it because the bar was too low on your back for that narrow of a grip and your wrists were cocked back too far.

That and you are firing your glutes too hard and unracking like a dingus.

If you're wanting honesty.

Pull the bar down on your back like a lat pulldown, keep those wrists straight, unrack with controlled continual pressure and lock out smooth and evenly.


#9

a heavier third? really? dude that squat was a grinder. Are you actually suggesting that the weight was just too light for him to hold onto? lol. Not everybody ends up hitting their 100% absolute max in every meet. And if he's fucking dropping the bar on the attempt, I don't see how you can suggest 'just go heavier bro'.

Anyway. Torso angle and potentially narrowness of grip are the issues. You got way too upright at the top if you're gonna use such a low bar position. IMO you also need to control speed better as you finish the lift. Once you get through your sticking point, you can push a little less hard as you complete the lift. I feel like you got excited once you 'knew' you had the lift. I used to do the same thing. Push the absolute shit out of the bar once I knew it was coming up to make it feel like I just nailed the lift. Don't do that.


#10

I know where the "go heavier" comes from but a 5 second squat is indeed nearing the max for the day most likely :wink:

Bar pop comes from either 1) the weight being too light 2) over firing the glutes as hard as possible just to look cool. I doubt OP was trying to look cool, he just didn't want to die during his squat.

Torso positioning, hands, etc that all can be changed as well. Poor positioning + bar pop = potential death to someone.


#11

If the problem was the weight being too light, you would think he'd drop training reps all the time, right?


#12

I agree completely, the problem isn't it was too light but I see where jbackos was coming from with his statement.

It doesn't apply to this situation but it CAN be a valid answer to bar pop.

Back to the OP though I think most all of us are on the same page with what his issues are. More back tightness and better control after his sticking point.


#13

Did you get kicked out of the meet for dumping the bar?


#14

Never heard of someone getting kicked out for dumping on a first offense. Usually a warning that if it happens again . . . Since it was his third attempt, shouldn't have been an issue. Still, a very weird dump.


#15

I did not get kicked out, all I received was a friendly reminder about the necessity of staying with the bar and that future drops could result in disqualification.


#16

I will definitely work on that back tightness and control, and remind myself that a squat isn't done until it's successfully racked, thanks for your help!


#17

These points all definitely make sense, I was excited getting that weight up because it was a new pr. I'll be spending my training between now and my next meet playing with grip and torso angle for sure! Thanks!


#18

I don't know how you could have stayed with the bar. You didn't dump it intentionally or walk out from under it. It popped off your back. As a ref, I wouldn't even warn someone for that. If you compete long enough, things will go sideways at some point. They have for me.

I agree with whoever said pull the bar down tight into your back as you ascend. I don't know that grip width would cause the issue. If you are fortunate enough to have the shoulder flexibility to keep your grip in tight, I think it would assist in keeping your back tight. The wider I go with my grip, the looser my back and less bar control I have.

That's a disappointing fail after locking it out.


#19

Over psyching can also do this. You need to control the amount of psych needed to lift the weight at hand. As the weight gets heavier, the arousal must also increase.


#20

You didn't understand my post. When the weight leaves your back the weight is too light. You need to either manage your psyche or learn to pick attempts with more accuracy. That's why I asked if it was a missed second.