T Nation

Minor Knee Problem?


I know I should just go to a doctor and I know I'm about to solicit medical advice on an internet forum. It's dumb, but I thought I'd ask anyways.

I went heavy on back squats to do a 10x3. Hadn't done that with squats before. It was tough and there was a small pop in my left knee while I was doing them. No pain. Then the next day, I experienced pain in my left knee. I only felt the pain when climbing stairs. Not a problem going down the stairs. There was no swelling.

I can walk around fine and I can get up the stairs by hopping a little bit. I've taken a week off of leg work and it's better. I still get a little pain now and then on the stairs, but only when I'm carrying something. Body weight is fine.

Any ideas? Good rehab suggestions? I've been lifting for about 1 1/2 years. I�??m 36 and this is my first ever knee problem. It's got me a little spooked.


Work on mobility drills: like knee circles (either with one foot at the time off of the floor and making circles or with feet together and making small circles with both knees together,) Butt kicks (kick the heel to your butt,) and prying (where you get deep and sort of move around.)

I realize that it has been awhile since you posted this, but mobility issues that aren't dealt with have a way of causing recurring problems. And, as non-intuitive as this sounds using anti-inflammatories around training can be counter-productive. Actually, I'm generally against NSAIDS except for chronic inflammation. Hope that helps


The same thing kind of happened to me. A small knee pop/ twist (or maybe a series of pops) and then hardly any pain. I did not go to a dr. at first but soon that minor discomfort started piling up. After a few months I couldnt even do bodyweight sqts. My knee was really hurting.
When I did go to a Dr. it was found that I had torn my plica which was removed through an arthroscopy.

My point is this- just cause its not hurting you much now doesnt mean its not gonna hurt you tomorrow. You might want to get a diagnosis to be on the safer side.