T Nation

Minimum Prehab Recommended

For an average person with no special injuries (perhaps they are a desk jockey) - what is the minimum time you’d get them to spend on prehab per day? And what exercises?

This includes static stretching, dynamic stretching, core work, foam rolling…etc… whatever.

I have been doing a LOT of prehab every day, probably totaling 1.5 hours per day - whether workout day or not.

What is the minimum you’d recommend to the average person to stay healthy?

it’s not about that man. There’s no point in just doing tons of prehab stuff for hours on end.

20 minutes of QUALITY work is better than 2 hours of farting around.

You need to make sure what you’re doing is addressing your own specific weaknesses/imbalances. If you’re taking an hour and a half doing prehab stuff then my guess is a LOT of that shit you’re doing is getting you nowhere.

Also, the §rehab stuff you’re doing will only get you so far. Activation work and bodyweight stuff to get the right muscles firing is all well and good, but you actually need to strengthen the movement patterns. For example, glute activation work is a precursor to getting in the gym and really strengthening those muscles with things like squats and deads. Activation work and prehab stuff will only get you so far.

As for your question, I really doubt anyone needs more than a half hour at the end of the day stretching/foam rolling/activating, and I’d bet that most folk wouldn’t even need that much.

To be honest lunk, I think you spend waaaaaaay too much time thinking about this shit. Get in the gym and do what you can. Get strong at the movements that aren’t contraindicated for you (and I bet there’s less contraindicated movements than you think there are) and strengthen that perpetually injured body of yours.

I dunno if I agree rds. You are saying that people can only fix themselves (their movement patterns, their posture…etc…) so far with prehab, but only with heavy strength exercises like squats and deadlifts will they actually fix their posture and move correctly?

So, without heavy strength training you’ll never be able to have good posture, and quality movement patterns?

I’m not sure, sure all the non-meathead people who do stuff like yoga and nothing else (and yoga is, essentially, prehab drills) are not jacked by any means - but some of them actually do have good posture and movement patterns, don’t they? But you’re saying good posture and movement patterns are pretty much impossible to attain without heavy strength training?

I don’t think that is what he said at all…

no, that’s not what I’m saying.

If your goal is just to move around and not have a bad back or whatever, then do all the activation work you like and be done with it.

If, however, you’d actually like to lift weights at some point, then you are going to need to make sure you can do those new, better movement patterns with a barbell in your hand or on your back.

now quit making threads about your posture and go and actually lift some god damn weights!

You seem like a good kid, and you’re keen to learn and that’s a good, commendable thing, but all this time spent obsessing over your posture, your APT, your glute activation and blah blah blah is not doing you any good.

From now on, do a 20 mins of prehab stuff at night. Pick the most important thing for you to be doing right now, which is most likely glute and core work, and do 3 sets of an exercise superset with a different exercise. So you could do bird dogs superset with glute bridges, as an example.

3 sets, and you’re done. No more of this 1.5 hours a night nonsense.

Get your ass in a gym. Start with a warm up of foam rolling and glute and core activation, then move on to a squat type thing with little spinal loading, like DBSS, and do those until your current back pain symptoms subside. Might take weeks, might take months, but it’ll happen if you’re patient. Once they do, you’re going to start front squatting. When you do decide to front squat, you are going to use a box. You will set this box to a height slightly above the deepest you can go before your back rounds. That might be rock bottom, it might be 2 inches down. Whatever height it is , it has to be high enough so that there is no rounding of your back whatsoever. You might find you never progress past front squatting, and back squatting is out completely.

As for deadlifts, no more pulling from the floor for you. You are going to start with cable pull throughs or barbell hip thrusts and do those until your back doesn’t hurt anymore. Be careful not to hyperextend your spine doing hip thrusts. Once your back pain is gone, you are going to do RDLs, keeping a tight as fuck arch in your back. You might find that you can only go down to an inch or two above your kneecaps. That’s just the way it is sometimes. The key thing is to make sure your back does not flex in the least.

do this for me, and you WILL have no more problems with your posture or back.

Now go lift some weights right now!

[quote]rds63799 wrote:
no, that’s not what I’m saying.

If your goal is just to move around and not have a bad back or whatever, then do all the activation work you like and be done with it.

If, however, you’d actually like to lift weights at some point, then you are going to need to make sure you can do those new, better movement patterns with a barbell in your hand or on your back.

now quit making threads about your posture and go and actually lift some god damn weights!

You seem like a good kid, and you’re keen to learn and that’s a good, commendable thing, but all this time spent obsessing over your posture, your APT, your glute activation and blah blah blah is not doing you any good.

From now on, do a 20 mins of prehab stuff at night. Pick the most important thing for you to be doing right now, which is most likely glute and core work, and do 3 sets of an exercise superset with a different exercise. So you could do bird dogs superset with glute bridges, as an example.

3 sets, and you’re done. No more of this 1.5 hours a night nonsense.

Get your ass in a gym. Start with a warm up of foam rolling and glute and core activation, then move on to a squat type thing with little spinal loading, like DBSS, and do those until your current back pain symptoms subside. Might take weeks, might take months, but it’ll happen if you’re patient. Once they do, you’re going to start front squatting. When you do decide to front squat, you are going to use a box. You will set this box to a height slightly above the deepest you can go before your back rounds. That might be rock bottom, it might be 2 inches down. Whatever height it is , it has to be high enough so that there is no rounding of your back whatsoever. You might find you never progress past front squatting, and back squatting is out completely.

As for deadlifts, no more pulling from the floor for you. You are going to start with cable pull throughs or barbell hip thrusts and do those until your back doesn’t hurt anymore. Be careful not to hyperextend your spine doing hip thrusts. Once your back pain is gone, you are going to do RDLs, keeping a tight as fuck arch in your back. You might find that you can only go down to an inch or two above your kneecaps. That’s just the way it is sometimes. The key thing is to make sure your back does not flex in the least.

do this for me, and you WILL have no more problems with your posture or back.

Now go lift some weights right now![/quote]

Good post!! Great advice for anyone just starting to train or rehabbing APT.

haha, thanks rds. I actually should be a good squatter due to favorable squatting leverages, but crappy hip mobility prevents me.

Just one question: can something like DBSS be the end of the road for me, or does it have to be a stepping stone to front squats? I mean, if you progress either exercise (including the single-leg stuff) - surely you can continue to make gains on that as long as you’re improving at the lift?

Personally, I had to stop progressing Bulgarian split squats after I hit 265lb x 10 (I did the barbell version). They made my knees ache during and after each workout, I’m guessing due to the heavy grinding on the menisci. I was doing them because I couldn’t do regular squats because they made my hip ache. I had to address my imbalances and mobility issues and now I am squatting again and trying to get back to where I was.

[quote]lunk wrote:
Just one question: can something like DBSS be the end of the road for me, or does it have to be a stepping stone to front squats? I mean, if you progress either exercise (including the single-leg stuff) - surely you can continue to make gains on that as long as you’re improving at the lift?[/quote]

you could stick with DBSS for as long as you like, I am just recommending it for the time being because it doesn’t load your spine (assuming you use dumbells). Do them until your back pain is gone, then you can either choose to switch to front squats or you could milk DBSS a bit longer.