T Nation

Military Press

When I do military presses I find that my shoulders get really sore. Not the muscles, but the bones. Even if I use very little weight and it isn’t hard to push it up, my shoulders still get sore.

Anyone have advice to fix this?

How low do you drop the bar? It shouldn’t be going below your chin during reps.

[quote]michaelangelos wrote:
When I do military presses I find that my shoulders get really sore. Not the muscles, but the bones. Even if I use very little weight and it isn’t hard to push it up, my shoulders still get sore.

Anyone have advice to fix this?[/quote]

Correct scapular positioning will have a lot to do with the safe execution of overhead lifting activities. What is correct scapular positioning and how can one go about achieving it? Use the search function and look up articles by Cressey, Robertson and Boyle. Shoulder issues are probably one of the most common questions around here and you will not be getting any new answers by asking questions that already have extremely good sources relating to them.

It also may be simply a techniques issue. Not to beat a slightly dead horse but get “Starting Strength” and get the lifts form down.

Furthermore, i do not think bones “hurt” per se. You may not be getting a safe ROM because of your techniques or posture and things are clicking and getting caught up in there and inflamation of soft tissue follows.

Further, furthermore, do you know what the bones of the shoulder joint are? What the ligaments are that connect them and the muscles that creat (and resist) movement with the area? There is so much info out there for basic questions like this that a little reading and self education goes a very, very long way.

Nobody can answer your question as phrased.

just make sure your arms dont drop below your chin as rsg said, the bottom of your ROM should be when the bar reaches the height of your chin

[quote]rsg wrote:
How low do you drop the bar? It shouldn’t be going below your chin during reps.[/quote]

That fixed it. Thanks.

Hit red button…“that was easy.”

where are your hands spaced try bringing then in close if you are wide gripping it

Phill

[quote]rsg wrote:
How low do you drop the bar? It shouldn’t be going below your chin during reps.[/quote]

Can somebody please tell me the reasoning behind this? I go down the full ROM. I own Starting Strength and don’t recall any mention of stopping at the chin.

[quote]Baldr wrote:
rsg wrote:
How low do you drop the bar? It shouldn’t be going below your chin during reps.

Can somebody please tell me the reasoning behind this? I go down the full ROM. I own Starting Strength and don’t recall any mention of stopping at the chin.[/quote]

I own 2 shoulder joints and I don’t do anything that hurts them. And there’s no “functional” reason to train to that ROM. In the real world you can drive with your legs to move shit above your head.

[quote]FightingScott wrote:
Baldr wrote:
rsg wrote:
How low do you drop the bar? It shouldn’t be going below your chin during reps.

Can somebody please tell me the reasoning behind this? I go down the full ROM. I own Starting Strength and don’t recall any mention of stopping at the chin.

I own 2 shoulder joints and I don’t do anything that hurts them. And there’s no “functional” reason to train to that ROM. In the real world you can drive with your legs to move shit above your head. [/quote]

In the real world, you probably don’t need to push 100 kg over your head.
Just like in the benchpress, the upper part is mostly triceps-dominant - and if you wan’t big shoulders, it probably isn’t the wisest thing to pushpress afai can see.

The reason why some people hurt while doing shoulder presses is because their shoulders are less flexible than others.

[quote]FightingScott wrote:
Baldr wrote:
rsg wrote:
How low do you drop the bar? It shouldn’t be going below your chin during reps.

Can somebody please tell me the reasoning behind this? I go down the full ROM. I own Starting Strength and don’t recall any mention of stopping at the chin.

I own 2 shoulder joints and I don’t do anything that hurts them. And there’s no “functional” reason to train to that ROM. In the real world you can drive with your legs to move shit above your head. [/quote]

Well put that way, there’s no functional reason to use weights at all.

When you can move a weight from a dead stop from the bottom of full range of motion to full extension you own it. The problem is when people try to move weights that are too heavy for them from that bottom position. Folks going for ego weight or to do overloading for accelerating development or for sport-specific reasons will use the shortened range of motion.

I personally use the full range of motion and it has never hurt my shoulder joint. I’ve injured it in the middle portion of the lift, but never the at the bottom.

Keep in mind - way back when - one of the olympic lifts was a full ROM overhead press from the bottom with no leg drive. I don’t think those guys hurt themselves too often.

However, ROM argument really comes down to either, what is your preference, what is your sport requirement or what is your capability. Arguing about what is proper ROM is pointless unless the context is clear.

[quote]skidmark wrote:
or to do overloading for accelerating development[/quote]

Does that work? That’s actually what I’m doing with everything.

Yes - they’re called partials. Partial movements let you overload so the central nervous system adjusts to a new level of weight. They can also be a form of progression. That is, as you get stronger, you increase the range of motion.

But I use them only in conjunction with full ROM. That is, I do them for one or two weeks and then go back to full ROM. Right now I’m doing OH press partials once a week from dead stop at eye level. Once I hit 200 lbs, I will begin dropping the pins until they are at my collarbones. The other day is a complete ROM oh press for reps.

I wouldn’t do these if I was just starting out. I’d do (and did) full range of motion for higher reps (8-12) to get the joints to adjust to being worked at all. After awhile, as you get stronger and your connective tissues have adjusted to loading you can work them in.