T Nation

Military Press

hey guys,
when military pressing, how low do you bring the bar back? is it just past the face area and then up again, or all the way down on to the upper chest? do you see any advantage in doing a full ROM? I presume, the main difference in how your muscles work,is that, the more you lower the bar, the more your lats are involved…thanks for in advance for the answers…

I bring it all the way down to my Upper Chest.

All I know is that Military Pressing like this has made my bench EXPLODE.

It works the Upper Chest Fibers better and helps you really explode off your chest when benching.

As for if it stimulates the deltoids more, I’m not sure?

[quote]devoted wrote:
hey guys,
when military pressing, how low do you bring the bar back? is it just past the face area and then up again, or all the way down on to the upper chest? do you see any advantage in doing a full ROM? I presume, the main difference in how your muscles work,is that, the more you lower the bar, the more your lats are involved…thanks for in advance for the answers…[/quote]

I bring it all the way down. I use my lats as a shelf so I’m more stable.

CS

Bring it all the way down, if you don’t touch at the bottom you are likely to cheat the weight higher and higher as you move the weight up. Stopping just before touching will turn into stopping below the chin which will turn into stopping above the chin, and the next thing you know it’s just anarchy. It’s like those silly guys who bench without touching the weight to their chest, eventually they’re just doing quarter reps and everyone is laughing about them behind their backs.

Bring it down as low as you can while keeping your elbows under the bar, once they start to internally rotate and you assume more of an incline press position you are putting greater stress on the shoulder joint. I am not crazy flexible and I usually bring the bar down to my adam’s apple. Touching the chest is likely to work the upper chest a bit more b/c you will almost inevitably lean back to do that. the front and middle delts are the main part of the shoulders working a military press. The lats do very little active movement in a military press although as noted above they can be a shelf to press off of. Traps are working a bit as well, more or less depending on form. Tris of course help extend the arm and core for stability.

With a thumbless grip, bringing the bar right down to rest on my clavicles between each reps seems to not bother my shoulder at all. Which is saying a bit, as my shoulders tend to break just by looking at a pressing movement.

I feel stronger when I get it to touch my chest. However, that’s probably due to using lats as a shelf so I kind of bounce it up with my lats when I flare them to keep tight.

[quote]Tim Henriques wrote:
Bring it down as low as you can while keeping your elbows under the bar, once they start to internally rotate and you assume more of an incline press position you are putting greater stress on the shoulder joint. I am not crazy flexible and I usually bring the bar down to my adam’s apple. Touching the chest is likely to work the upper chest a bit more b/c you will almost inevitably lean back to do that. the front and middle delts are the main part of the shoulders working a military press. The lats do very little active movement in a military press although as noted above they can be a shelf to press off of. Traps are working a bit as well, more or less depending on form. Tris of course help extend the arm and core for stability. [/quote]

Does the triceps keeping the core stable have something to do with the long head attaching to the scapula?

Pretty sure those are two separate statements, that a) the tris help extend the arm, and b) the core helps with stability, as opposed to “the tris help extend the arm and help the core with stability.”

Tim can clarify, but pretty sure he didn’t mean that the triceps help stabilize the core.

I used to bring the bar down to my upper chest, but that started to really beat up my elbows as the weights got heavier. Never had a problem with my shoulders, and was always able to keep my elbows under the bar, it was just really torquing them at the bottom. I’m now lowering it to my chin, and that seems to help a lot.

I still feel like I’m able to use the lats as a shelf, though I do get less explosion out of the bottom now. I think it’s actually harder this way, at least for me. Also could just be getting used to it. I’ve only been pressing this way for 3 weeks.

I bring it down to my nose. Going lower consistently made me want to rip my left rotator cuff out because fuck it, that hurt.

Do whatever allows you to press more on the bench. MP is not a tested lift.

[quote]DixiesFinest wrote:
MP is not a tested lift. [/quote]

Although it would be a good fourth lift.

CS

Olympic Lifting used to have it. I suppose Powerlifting could have it if it wanted :slight_smile:
Would be cool to see it competed somewhere.

I know the APA has it, but its in the “sport” division

thanks for your input guys. I’ll try and lower it all the way down tommorrow and see how many reps it brings me down from my current number. currently I do 60kg for 11 reps( I know, it sucks), I lower it to my chin and then up. I do have long arms though, ( height 194cm.) but that’s not an excuse :slight_smile: thanks again…

You should try checking out Rippetoes press instruction, he instructs pressing from the upper chest and has a ton of other useful tips on how to up your press, or why you might miss a lift.

[quote]DixiesFinest wrote:
MP is not a tested lift. [/quote]

Oh it is, it’s a test of manhood.

[quote]Fletch1986 wrote:

[quote]Tim Henriques wrote:
Bring it down as low as you can while keeping your elbows under the bar, once they start to internally rotate and you assume more of an incline press position you are putting greater stress on the shoulder joint. I am not crazy flexible and I usually bring the bar down to my adam’s apple. Touching the chest is likely to work the upper chest a bit more b/c you will almost inevitably lean back to do that. the front and middle delts are the main part of the shoulders working a military press. The lats do very little active movement in a military press although as noted above they can be a shelf to press off of. Traps are working a bit as well, more or less depending on form. Tris of course help extend the arm and core for stability. [/quote]

Does the triceps keeping the core stable have something to do with the long head attaching to the scapula?[/quote]

Sparty was correct, that is what I get for writing too fast. Triceps extend the arm. The core gets a lot of work in the standing overhead press to create stability. Sorry about that

[quote]Tim Henriques wrote:

[quote]Fletch1986 wrote:

[quote]Tim Henriques wrote:
Bring it down as low as you can while keeping your elbows under the bar, once they start to internally rotate and you assume more of an incline press position you are putting greater stress on the shoulder joint. I am not crazy flexible and I usually bring the bar down to my adam’s apple. Touching the chest is likely to work the upper chest a bit more b/c you will almost inevitably lean back to do that. the front and middle delts are the main part of the shoulders working a military press. The lats do very little active movement in a military press although as noted above they can be a shelf to press off of. Traps are working a bit as well, more or less depending on form. Tris of course help extend the arm and core for stability. [/quote]

Does the triceps keeping the core stable have something to do with the long head attaching to the scapula?[/quote]

Sparty was correct, that is what I get for writing too fast. Triceps extend the arm. The core gets a lot of work in the standing overhead press to create stability. Sorry about that

[/quote]

np, thanks for verifying.