T Nation

Mice and Keto diet


#1

http://www.jpost.com/Health/Article.aspx?id=284729

from discussion of the actual study

"Animals fed ketogenic diet ate the same number of calories as animals that were fed either chow or a high-fat diet but nevertheless failed to gain weight. Remarkably, animals eating ketogenic diet lost a small amount of weight and achieved the same weight and body composition as animals that were calorie restricted to 66% of usual daily intake. "


#2

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
http://www.jpost.com/Health/Article.aspx?id=284729

from discussion of the actual study

"Animals fed ketogenic diet ate the same number of calories as animals that were fed either chow or a high-fat diet but nevertheless failed to gain weight. Remarkably, animals eating ketogenic diet lost a small amount of weight and achieved the same weight and body composition as animals that were calorie restricted to 66% of usual daily intake. "[/quote]

Cutting out 1/3 of daily calories long term shouldn’t be too psychologically difficult.


#3

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
http://www.jpost.com/Health/Article.aspx?id=284729

from discussion of the actual study

"Animals fed ketogenic diet ate the same number of calories as animals that were fed either chow or a high-fat diet but nevertheless failed to gain weight. Remarkably, animals eating ketogenic diet lost a small amount of weight and achieved the same weight and body composition as animals that were calorie restricted to 66% of usual daily intake. "[/quote]

Cutting out 1/3 of daily calories long term shouldn’t be too psychologically difficult.[/quote]

I don’t think that was JF’s intent in posting that.


#4

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
http://www.jpost.com/Health/Article.aspx?id=284729

from discussion of the actual study

"Animals fed ketogenic diet ate the same number of calories as animals that were fed either chow or a high-fat diet but nevertheless failed to gain weight. Remarkably, animals eating ketogenic diet lost a small amount of weight and achieved the same weight and body composition as animals that were calorie restricted to 66% of usual daily intake. "[/quote]

Cutting out 1/3 of daily calories long term shouldn’t be too psychologically difficult.[/quote]

I don’t think that was JF’s intent in posting that.[/quote]

Nope, nor is cutting calories by 1/3 something someone looking to gain muscle or even be able to sustain long-term for weight loss a good thing. Cutting calories leads to failure most of the time because the body will fight back.

Let me also point out, my main contention of posting this is to again show how counting calories may not work for a few reasons :wink:


#5

I don’t have any journal access at the moment, but the article was obviously not written by a scientist nor was it nearly thorough enough to be convincing. I’d like to see the paper before I give the claims any credit. However, if it actually was good science, that is an impressive result.


#6

Apologies, the discussion I quoted was from another study that was on keto mice diet as seen here:
http://m.ajpendo.physiology.org/content/292/6/E1724.full

Here is the study from the article I linked above
http://www.fasebj.org/content/26/8/3493


#7

lol, thought mice were going to be the new keto superfood


#8

they are… dig in