T Nation

Mental Perception vs Ability

Question, do you think that your perception of what is possible has any affect at all on what you can achieve?

no, I still try as hard as I can anyway

Contrary to popular belief, there is in fact a spoon.

God Help Us

This is getting insane.

[quote]rds63799 wrote:
no, I still try as hard as I can anyway[/quote]

Question, if someone told you daily that you were stupid growing up, do you think this would affect how you thought of your own mental ability?

[quote]super saiyan wrote:
God Help Us

This is getting insane.[/quote]

Dude, if you have to come into a thread I start just to start shit, YOU are the one trolling.

[quote]rds63799 wrote:
no, I still try as hard as I can anyway[/quote]

This.

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]super saiyan wrote:
God Help Us

This is getting insane.[/quote]

Dude, if you have to come into a thread I start just to start shit, YOU are the one trolling.[/quote]

You are the one trolling when you argue the same thing in three different threads. Get a life, man. Get some hobbies. Get a girlfriend. Volunteer somewhere. Stop arguing on the internet with strangers so much. 50,000 posts!

[quote]Ripsaw3689 wrote:

[quote]rds63799 wrote:
no, I still try as hard as I can anyway[/quote]

This. [/quote]

So you think that how you see the world and what you believe in has no affect or consequence on your potential?

[quote]Waittz wrote:
Contrary to popular belief, there is in fact a spoon. [/quote]

‘There is no spoon’ implies that, despite all visual, physical, or mental evidence to the contrary, the thing in question does not exist.

Could this idea ever refer to past social limitations placed on people due to sex or race?

@Professor X- I don’t know that you even need to be told that your studpid: Look at this research by Robert Rosenthal, Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Riverside

In the late 1960s, Rosenthal had the teachers in one elementary school give their students a test that was supposed to predict which students were destined to dramatically grow their I.Q. score during the school year. After the tests were collected, Rosenthal picked at random a small group of students to be labeled ?academic spurters.

Rosenthal told the teachers that students identified as ?academic spurters? were certain to grow their I.Q. over the next year. Let?s be clear here, these students were chosen at random, so this claim was completely imaginary. At the end of the school year, Rosenthal retested every student?s I.Q. in the school and found that the students labeled as ?academic spurters? had their I.Q.s rise an average of 12 points, while the rest of the student body only saw an 8 point increase. Teachers were tricked into believing their students were destined for academic growth and grow they did.

[quote]sonnyp wrote:
@Professor X- I don’t know that you even need to be told that your studpid: Look at this research by Robert Rosenthal, Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Riverside

In the late 1960s, Rosenthal had the teachers in one elementary school give their students a test that was supposed to predict which students were destined to dramatically grow their I.Q. score during the school year. After the tests were collected, Rosenthal picked at random a small group of students to be labeled ?academic spurters.
Rosenthal told the teachers that students identified as ?academic spurters? were certain to grow their I.Q. over the next year. Let?s be clear here, these students were chosen at random, so this claim was completely imaginary. At the end of the school year, Rosenthal retested every student?s I.Q. in the school and found that the students labeled as ?academic spurters? had their I.Q.s rise an average of 12 points, while the rest of the student body only saw an 8 point increase. Teachers were tricked into believing their students were destined for academic growth and grow they did.[/quote]

How does this make me stupid?

you missed his point lol

[quote]browndisaster wrote:
you missed his point lol[/quote]

Maybe I did because if that “study” is real, it doesn’t flow with what others have stated in this thread.

try again

lol @ Dr. Rosenthal conducting “studies” He’s pretty much a legend in Behavioral Psych and self-fulfilling prophecies, so his work would be some of the best stuff to read for your topic. Sonny was agreeing with you…

I never called you stupid. You are indeed quite sensitive.
The “study” is quite real and actually very well known in academia, and it’s point is to show that it is not only what you believe you can do, but what the influential people in your life believe you can do. It goes to show that other’s pre-conceived notions about you, whether based in reality or not, will affect how successful you are. So, like I said, one need not even be told he is stupid. Simply being around an influencial figure who believes you are stupid is enough to negatively affect your performance.

[quote]browndisaster wrote:
try again

lol @ Dr. Rosenthal conducting “studies” He’s pretty much a legend in Behavioral Psych and self-fulfilling prophecies, so his work would be some of the best stuff to read for your topic. Sonny was agreeing with you…[/quote]

So why do people here seem to think what you believe doesn’t matter?

In my opinion it matters more than anything else.

[quote]sonnyp wrote:
In my opinion it matters more than anything else.[/quote]

That is what I believe also…which is one reason I take such an issue with literally defining exactly what someone can or can not do and telling them that this limit is the truth based on what has been done before.

mankind has made new steps into places before seen as only fantasy because we stopped believing that what had been done before is all there is. Am I right or wrong?

“In summary, the evidence produced thus far supports the use of imagery to benefit performance. Research has shown that imagery can produce better performance outcomes and have a positive effect on anxiety, motivation, and self-efficacy.”

Morris, Tony, Michael Spittle and Anthony P. Watt. Imagery in Sport. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2005.