T Nation

McCain Said 'That One'

So McCain referred to Obama as “That one” when speaking about a bill Obama voted for during the last debate. Of course, as you can imagine, the media has turned these two harmless words into a racially motivated, condescending and hate filled rant against Obama.

This is stupid. last night CNN was doing their little “McCain is a racist” bullshit. Now there are t shirts being made.

The stupidity of the news media is unbelievable sometimes.

Freudian slip?

Wonder what he was thinking when he said it.

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
Freudian slip?

Wonder what he was thinking when he said it.[/quote]

What the hell do you mean “That One”?

Laughable. It’s like saying “That Dude”. Oh wait…he really meant “That Nigger” right? Yeah…must be.

[quote]Rockscar wrote:
LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
Freudian slip?

Wonder what he was thinking when he said it.

What the hell do you mean “That One”?

Laughable. It’s like saying “That Dude”. Oh wait…he really meant “That Nigger” right? Yeah…must be.[/quote]

I typically use the 3rd person masculine or feminie when speaking indirectly about someone else – him or her.

“That one” would be more suitable as a reference for an inanimate object or animal.

“Which puppy do you want Timmy?”

“That ONE!”
~
“Ma’am, which person in the line up molested you in the parking lot at Piggly Wiggly?”

“That one, officer”

It might make sense to use “that one” where there is more than one possible person to choose from when there is no clear reference.

I make no claim as to whether it was intended as a racial slur or a racial slur in general.

I agree this is probably a non-issue.

Because the stupidity now becomes officially unbearable here is some intellectual relieve:

Our form of government does not enter into rivalry with the institutions of others. Our government does not copy our neighbors’, but is an example to them. It is true that we are called a democracy, for the administration is in the hands of the many and not of the few. But while there exists equal justice to all and alike in their private disputes, the claim of excellence is also recognized; and when a citizen is in any way distinguished, he is preferred to the public service, not as a matter of privilege, but as the reward of merit. Neither is poverty an obstacle, but a man may benefit his country whatever the obscurity of his condition. There is no exclusiveness in our public life, and in our private business we are not suspicious of one another, nor angry with our neighbor if he does what he likes; we do not put on sour looks at him which, though harmless, are not pleasant. While we are thus unconstrained in our private business, a spirit of reverence pervades our public acts; we are prevented from doing wrong by respect for the authorities and for the laws, having a particular regard to those which are ordained for the protection of the injured as well as those unwritten laws which bring upon the transgressor of them the reprobation of the general sentiment.

http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/GREECE/PERICLES.HTM

OK…wouldn’t it be funny if they started talking in the first person, like “Jimmy” from Seinfeld.

“Johnny thinks a $5000 tax credit for health benefits is good.”

“Barrack wants to invest in energy”

"Sarah wants to give a shout out to the third graders’

"Big Joe comes from a hard ass town called Scranton’

I don’t think it was meant as a racial slur, but it was definitely not something nice to say in any way. I understand that they have call each others liars and stuff, but the use of “that one” with the smirk displayed after says a lot more about the man using it, than it does about the one it’s used against.

McCain did seem more nervous than Obama, and I don’t think John sees his choice of terms as the best he could have come up with. McCain himself probably considers it a blunder and that’s all that matters in this “story”.

[quote]lixy wrote:
I don’t think it was meant as a racial slur, but it was definitely not something nice to say in any way. I understand that they have call each others liars and stuff, but the use of “that one” with the smirk displayed after says a lot more about the man using it, than it does about the one it’s used against.

McCain did seem more nervous than Obama, and I don’t think John sees his choice of terms as the best he could have come up with. McCain himself probably considers it a blunder and that’s all that matters in this “story”. [/quote]

I thought he was nervous too - he also seemed rather brittle and angry, and often reaching for words. I think it just kind of slipped out.

[quote]katzenjammer wrote:
lixy wrote:
I don’t think it was meant as a racial slur, but it was definitely not something nice to say in any way. I understand that they have call each others liars and stuff, but the use of “that one” with the smirk displayed after says a lot more about the man using it, than it does about the one it’s used against.

McCain did seem more nervous than Obama, and I don’t think John sees his choice of terms as the best he could have come up with. McCain himself probably considers it a blunder and that’s all that matters in this “story”.

I thought he was nervous too - he also seemed rather brittle and angry, and often reaching for words. I think it just kind of slipped out.[/quote]

I was surprised at how uncomfortable he appeared also considering it was supposed to be his format, my friend.

He always appears as if he is attempting to squelch his anger. I wonder what his blood pressure is.

But I don’t think the comment was racist.

I don’t think anyone really cares one way or the other. Don’t we have bigger things to worry about?

The Daily Show had a solid parody of it last night:

[quote]Christine wrote:
katzenjammer wrote:
lixy wrote:
I don’t think it was meant as a racial slur, but it was definitely not something nice to say in any way. I understand that they have call each others liars and stuff, but the use of “that one” with the smirk displayed after says a lot more about the man using it, than it does about the one it’s used against.

McCain did seem more nervous than Obama, and I don’t think John sees his choice of terms as the best he could have come up with. McCain himself probably considers it a blunder and that’s all that matters in this “story”.

I thought he was nervous too - he also seemed rather brittle and angry, and often reaching for words. I think it just kind of slipped out.

I was surprised at how uncomfortable he appeared also considering it was supposed to be his format, my friend.

He always appears as if he is attempting to squelch his anger. I wonder what his blood pressure is.

But I don’t think the comment was racist.

[/quote]

To be honest, I felt a little sorry for him. It’s rather difficult to share the stage with someone who can easily upstage you visually. I really don’t think he realized what it would be like to stand next to Obama who - whatever else - looked like something out of GQ. And then there was McCain, old, tired, angry, short, broken, rumpled.

As an Obama supporter I think it is STUPID to call McCain a racist based upon that statement. Whether or not it shows a lack of respect might be debatable. Quite frankly, I gave it little notice when it actually happened.

In any case, while I think civility is important, it’s much more important to focus on the real issues rather than petty bullshit like this one.

[quote]katzenjammer wrote:
Christine wrote:
katzenjammer wrote:
lixy wrote:
I don’t think it was meant as a racial slur, but it was definitely not something nice to say in any way. I understand that they have call each others liars and stuff, but the use of “that one” with the smirk displayed after says a lot more about the man using it, than it does about the one it’s used against.

McCain did seem more nervous than Obama, and I don’t think John sees his choice of terms as the best he could have come up with. McCain himself probably considers it a blunder and that’s all that matters in this “story”.

I thought he was nervous too - he also seemed rather brittle and angry, and often reaching for words. I think it just kind of slipped out.

I was surprised at how uncomfortable he appeared also considering it was supposed to be his format, my friend.

He always appears as if he is attempting to squelch his anger. I wonder what his blood pressure is.

But I don’t think the comment was racist.

To be honest, I felt a little sorry for him. It’s rather difficult to share the stage with someone who can easily upstage you visually. I really don’t think he realized what it would be like to stand next to Obama who - whatever else - looked like something out of GQ. And then there was McCain, old, tired, angry, short, broken, rumpled.
[/quote]

I felt sorry for the old guy too. I knew that Obama had a better stage presence about him, but I didn’t realize just how much until watching that debate.

McCain would have looked better behind a podium.

[quote]I was surprised at how uncomfortable he appeared also considering it was supposed to be his format, my friend.

He always appears as if he is attempting to squelch his anger. I wonder what his blood pressure is. [/quote]

Yep. He’s practically Bob Dole II. He might as well start referring to himself in the third person, my friends.

[quote]entheogens wrote:
As an Obama supporter I think it is STUPID to call McCain a racist based upon that statement. Whether or not it shows a lack of respect might be debatable. Quite frankly, I gave it little notice when it actually happened.

In any case, while I think civility is important, it’s much more important to focus on the real issues rather than petty bullshit like this one.[/quote]

Race is pretty much Obama’s game. He’s already running away with the polls, but then again, Obama’s probably had more to do with racism accusation than anything else. It’s the electioneers.

Edit: *Obama’s people probably had…

[quote]entheogens wrote:
As an Obama supporter I think it is STUPID to call McCain a racist based upon that statement. Whether or not it shows a lack of respect might be debatable. Quite frankly, I gave it little notice when it actually happened.

In any case, while I think civility is important, it’s much more important to focus on the real issues rather than petty bullshit like this one.[/quote]

ditto.

[quote]therover wrote:
OK…wouldn’t it be funny if they started talking in the first person, like “Jimmy” from Seinfeld.

“Johnny thinks a $5000 tax credit for health benefits is good.”

“Barrack wants to invest in energy”

"Sarah wants to give a shout out to the third graders’

"Big Joe comes from a hard ass town called Scranton’

[/quote]

Biden already does this. All the time.

“There is no better friend to the middle class than Joe Biden.”
“Joe Biden knows what its like to put food in your kitchen.”

etc

Racist? No. Weird and awkward? Yes. A bit impolite? Certainly. Something worth discussing? Not really.

[quote]Christine wrote:
katzenjammer wrote:
Christine wrote:
katzenjammer wrote:
lixy wrote:
I don’t think it was meant as a racial slur, but it was definitely not something nice to say in any way. I understand that they have call each others liars and stuff, but the use of “that one” with the smirk displayed after says a lot more about the man using it, than it does about the one it’s used against.

McCain did seem more nervous than Obama, and I don’t think John sees his choice of terms as the best he could have come up with. McCain himself probably considers it a blunder and that’s all that matters in this “story”.

I thought he was nervous too - he also seemed rather brittle and angry, and often reaching for words. I think it just kind of slipped out.

I was surprised at how uncomfortable he appeared also considering it was supposed to be his format, my friend.

He always appears as if he is attempting to squelch his anger. I wonder what his blood pressure is.

But I don’t think the comment was racist.

To be honest, I felt a little sorry for him. It’s rather difficult to share the stage with someone who can easily upstage you visually. I really don’t think he realized what it would be like to stand next to Obama who - whatever else - looked like something out of GQ. And then there was McCain, old, tired, angry, short, broken, rumpled.

I felt sorry for the old guy too. I knew that Obama had a better stage presence about him, but I didn’t realize just how much until watching that debate.

McCain would have looked better behind a podium.[/quote]

For saying you don’t like this forum and don’t want to get involved, it looks like, by your avatar, you are jumping right in.

I often wonder why women hate palin. She’s a sucessful woman, who works, and has kids, and is the epitomy of a feministic dream with her accomplishments.

Why???

[quote]Rockscar wrote:

For saying you don’t like this forum and don’t want to get involved, it looks like, by your avatar, you are jumping right in.

I often wonder why women hate palin. She’s a sucessful woman, who works, and has kids, and is the epitomy of a feministic dream with her accomplishments.

Why???

[/quote]

I don’t hate her. The avatar is admittedly childish.

I consider myself a social liberal, meaning that I do not want morality legislated.

When she was first nominated, the impression was that she would somehow get the jilted woman vote. I find it insulting to assume that I would vote for someone based on the fact that their sex organs are neatly tucked up inside the body.

Really though, I don’t like any of the candidates.