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Maxing Out On Deadlift Variations 3 Times a Week

I’m not a full Powerlifter, but my goal is to have a strong deadlift and do some meets in the future.
I can’t follow percentages programs, I just can’t focus and training becomes boring, might be adhd don’t know.

I was wondering if a conjugate/Bulgarian type of training will benefit my deadlift.

At the moment I max out on a variation once a week and do 2 back high reps day(rows, pulldowns, shrugs, face pulls etc) and 1 for legs (SDL, rdl, squats, leg curls,leg presses)with some core work, shoulders and arms
But I would like to try “maxing out” three times a week rotating the variations.
For instance:
Week 1
Monday, deficit deadlift + back off sets
Wednesday, rack pull + back off sets
Friday, deadlift against bands + back off sets
Week 2
Monday, deadlift with chains + back off sets
Wednesday, trap bar deadlift + back off sets
Friday, reverse bands + back off sets

Etc.

Is it too much or should I just keep maxing out once a week ?

Maxing out even once per week is most likely increasing your risk of injury as weights get heavier. Whats your current max? I think running a DUP style programming with high frequency can possibly work. @ActivitiesGuy achieved a 600 pound deadlift using high frequency deadlifting. I may be wrong when i say this but I am pretty sure he pushed to a new PR once per week with a good bit left in the tank and other days was hitting 6-8 singles for submaximal speed work the rest of the week.

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Unless you have world class mental application and recovery (hint: you don’t). I wouldn’t do this.

Push with 2 or 3 reps (closer to 3) in the tank if you wamt that sort of frequency.

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220kg (500lbs?) Last time I tested, that’s probably why I can recover faster. But after a max effort I can’t really hammer my assistance work tbh, but two days after I feel strong with my back work, although I never tried maxing out 3 times a week.

I don’t push too hard if form starts to get ugly, it’s not a total grind with shakey legs

When you say max out, do you mean a true max? (100%+)

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That’s pretty close to what I did. I went from 505 to 600 in about eight months. I wouldn’t quite say that I pushed to a new PR every week, but I each week I would do four or five days of submaximal work (i.e. “six singles at 405”) and with one heavier session that peaked at a top single (500-545 depending on how I felt that day).

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Probably more around 95%

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Once a week is pretty much the upper limit for max deadlift frequency, and I would be cautious about doing that as it is. Are you making rapid progress with this method? If not then you would probably be better off not maxing out every week. What @ActivitiesGuy described sounds reasonable, considering that he is only really pushing the deadlift.

I would suggest learning to write your own program. It doesn’t need to be percentage based or mind numbing, but there is a reason why you don’t hear of people making great gains by maxing out on deadlifts regularly.

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Exactly. I know this is the powerlifting forum, and I do not compete in the sport of powerlifting, but I was tagged here and merely chimed in with my experience. I trained this way for a period of a couple months that really increased my deadlift (which I had decided to make a primary goal at the time). While I think it is a fairly reasonable way to train for someone interested in “general strength on a time budget” (i.e. someone that is only willing to devote 30 minutes per day / 4 hours per week / whatever to training) - I would never advocate this as an optimal powerlifting program

@chris_ottawa: we have jousted in the past, but I think you mistook advice that I was giving as “generalized advice for people that want to get strong with limited time to work out” for “this is how you should train for powerlifting” advice. I’d even call my advice reasonable for people with time constraints or limited access to equipment that still may be interested in competing on the local level. I’m not suggesting that one run this instead of (Powerlifting Coach X) program unless that’s the only way they can train in the constraints of their living situation.

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I agree with what you are saying, if you are only concerned with one lift then obviously don’t need to do as much as someone training for a full meet. The deadlift seems to respond well to lower volume in most cases as well, although a lot of people would argue that building the squat would help to increase the deadlift.

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Yeah it can be done but make sure you reign yourself in some days. -Give this below a whirl and could ask Thib some questions in his subforum…

If you’re going to DL 3x/week, especially to a max, I wouldn’t do down sets.

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would strongly argue this. Have pulled 655 deadlifting an average of once every 2 or 3 months by just focusing on my squat

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What was your squat around this time?

I squat 505 for 19 in wraps on same day and squat 800 a few months prior to the pull. It’s still roughly the same now.

I can’t say that it doesn’t work because obviously it did, but I still get the impression that you would have pulled more if you had deadlifted more often in training.

Oh I’m not arguing that at all. I’m just saying that building your squat will for sure build your Deadlift and that I don’t think ignoring the squat just you can Deadlift 1 or 2 extra times a week is the way to go.

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That’s fucking retarded strong. You are basically a walking testament to squat carryover into the DL. Someone like you can probably get away with DL less often. Do you feel like you get overtrained by deadlifting more often, say once a week or so?

OK then, we’re on the same page. I don’t really know what people who compete in push-pull meets do in their training but one of Josh Bryant’s books has a program that was written for a guy training for a push-pull meet and it has box squats and belt squats on one day and deadlifts only once a week. That guy apparently pulled a 100lb PR at the meet.

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I would implement pretty much exactly the same thing for a push pull guy.

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