T Nation

Maximum Hypertrophy


#1

Guys/gals

I have trained for 8 years in powerlifting now I moved to bodybuilding about 7 months ago,I was fat,I got thinner but
Really need to add some muscle to my frame because I didn't really have much to be honest.I had ok lifts at 95kg body weight

Squat 225kg
Deadlift 295.5kg
Bench 187.5kg

I am natural and only take weight protein.I have my diet set up nicely,getting in 2500 cals at the minute
But I will slowly increase,protein etc is enough too

My question is regarding training for muscle mass only.I just wondered how
Many sets on average you guys did for muscle groups?

And do you prefer to keep your reps in the 8-12 rep ranges?i was thinking
A heavy exercise up to a 8 rep max for the first exercise then doing higher rep work
For the rest?

Any help would be great :slightly_smiling: I do plan to train 4 days per week


#2

If you are a natural at that bodyweight, and you're not lying about your lifts, you should have plenty of muscle mass....

...which leads me to believe you are lying about your lifts.


#3

X2 Those are some pretty serious lifts.


#4

x3, we have similar stats (weight and lifts), yet you're complaining about a lack of muscle mass. I understand there is some variability between individuals, but that just does not compute. Maybe your body dysmorphia is getting the best of you.

To answer your questions, some body parts respond better to really high reps. Delts and legs, particularly. Don't be afraid of going over 20 reps a set. I did partials yesterday for side and rear delts (a drop set) and each set was well over 100 reps total. My delts have never responded better to anything than they do heavy partials for obscenely high reps.

Working one lift for strength (rep maxes though; nothing lower than 3-5 reps) and then doing volume work on everything else is pretty much exactly what I do. How much volume depends on you. You have to experiment. The amount of volume you're able to recover from is not a constant either, so you have to be willing and able to modify things as you go.


#5

What is "enough" protein? What does your current diet look like?

Depending on how fat (or lean) you are right now, you're almost definitely going to have to increase your total calories to gain size.

With your foundation of strength already in place, you should see a nice rebound effect if you switch to a drastically different, traditional bodybuilding program for a while:
http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/a_tried_and_true_bodybuilding_program_template


#6

Especially the bench. Equipped?


#7

Especially all of it.

Im in the U.S. so we use lbs but without using a calculator, he is saying he weighs like 230 lbs, squats 550ish, deadlifts 640ish, and benches 400+

Im gonna go out on a limb here and say if those stats are true this guy shouldnt be having to ask such basic questions on muscle building, regardless his background.


#8

weighs 230ish? 100kg is exactly 220lbs right? 95 kg couldn't be much more than 200, maybe 210 barely. Those lifts are pretty implausible


#9

He's saying he weighs 209lbs can bench 412, squat 495 and deadlift 650. I'm sure they're doable lifts if you've been training for strength for years and are pretty good at it but you'd be pretty muscular at this point.


#10

I dont know exactly what the conversion is, was just giving a rough estimate. I know a KG is a little over 2 lbs.


#11

Mike "No Fear" Johnson deadlifts 650. And his back looks freaking awesome.

Just saying.


#12

Why does everyone have to bash the OP's claim about his lifts? Provided his programming was in order, eight years of powerlifting training could very well have yielded those numbers at 95 kg (just shy of 210 lbs) bodyweight. And we all need to remember that "having the muscles of a bodybuilder" isn't always necessary for lifting that kind of weight. Good on the OP for being humble when it comes to his PRs, though, since those are indeed very good numbers!

For those interested, the current raw world records in the 100 kg weight class are:

Squat: 355 kg/782 lbs (Sam Byrd)
Bench Press: 265 kg/582 lbs (Mike MacDonald)
Deadlift: 410 kg/901 lbs (Ed Coan)

Source: http://www.powerliftingwatch.com/records/raw/world


#13

Not saying its impossible, but due to the very nature of the internet, its highly unlikely.


#14

^ Yes, true. Just saying, give the man the benefit of the doubt.


#15

That is a good point, and I wasn't trying to bash the guy at all. It's just surprising to read someone with really good strength numbers (assuming they're raw; and considering the DL is 150 lbs higher than the squat, I believe they are) say they don't have much in the way of mass. It's not congruent with what I've seen in reality.

So my apologies, OP, if my post came off as bashing in any way. I suppose the body dysmorphia comment could come across that way. I've been on the receiving end of that here before, waaaaaaay back in the day, and it sucks.