T Nation

Max Number of Deadlifts

I picked up the idea from somewhere that you shouldn’t do any more than about 5 reps on the deadlift. Is this just another weight training myth? I want to incorporate sumo and traditional ones into weeks 5-8 of TBT.
Thanks for any help

Not an expert by any means, but always do deads.

I find that one warmup set (sometimes 2) @ 40-50% max for 8-10 reps gets me prepped to lift heavier and better.

When I’ve skipped the light set, I simply haven’t done as well.

I’m thinking that since the DL is pretty much a total body exercise, it’s also lift that you have to train the CNS for.

But if you’re doing too many reps, you’re simply not going heavy enough and getting the benefits.

Well, hoping this reply inspires some better informed comments.

Best to all.

[quote]Breakdown wrote:
I picked up the idea from somewhere that you shouldn’t do any more than about 5 reps on the deadlift. Is this just another weight training myth? I want to incorporate sumo and traditional ones into weeks 5-8 of TBT.
Thanks for any help[/quote]

Whether it’s wrong or not, my lifting parnter and I are on the 2nd week of Chads TBT, which includes 2 sets of 15 on deads. I gotta tell you I was suckin wind after finishing those sets@250. These are standard deadlifts, not sumo. I would like some assistance on the sumo form.

I have heard this rumor before, I would also like to know if there is any validity to this. I have heard of people recommending to still reset between each rep even if you go into the higher reps. My main purpose is hypertrophy so I like to stay in the 4-8 rep range most of the time. Any Ideas??

Ive read before that it’s best to do low rep sets of deadlifts, only because the low back tends to get fatigued faster than most of the other muscles involved. So the more reps you do beyond 6 or so, the more likely your form is to break down, which could result in injury.

I wouldn’t go so far as to say you should NEVER do more than 6 or so reps - if you do, just pay special attention to form and technique. But I believe that a majority of deadlift/power clean workouts should be low rep.

If your main focus is on strength and how much you can pull off the floor, by all means keep the reps below six. However, the deadlift can be trained for higher reps, you just have to put your ego on the back burner for the workout. Choose a weight that allows picture perfect form. If you are pulling lets say 315, im sure you’ll be able to do 135 for sets of 10. Be smart with your load selection. Ive found that going over 10 reps is possible, but I take a 30sec rest/pause after the first 10 reps and then use groups of five to progress to the higher reps of the set with a pause after every fifth rep.

Well after reading walleye’s log I thought I’d give his 40 rep training a go. (only for a break from my normal routine)

Monday’s bench training was pretty tough but I ended up doing deadlifts with 135lbs for a set of 40 yesterday and my lower back and grip were not happy.

I’ve always trained deads below 12 reps, typically 1-6 reps, but 40 made an interesting change.

I am largely of the view that so long as you are consistent in increasing the volume of weight used in the deadlift, feel free to try various set rep schemes. Experiment with what works best for you.

What I like is 1,2 or 3 reps for Deadlift and no more than 5 reps for Sumo Deadlift (I’m at the beginning with Sumo style). Anyway in the past many strong men used the 20 reps breathing Squat routine. Similarly a 20 reps breathing Deadlift routine is also possible. After a single demanding 20 reps deadlift set you have to perform 20 reps of straight arm db pullover with a light weight. The idea is to expand the rib cage. After this you may perform a few sets of bench presses or V bar dips. In the end you get legs, back and chest stronger and bigger.
Have a good time !
Luca

I think your statement has some merit. The hamstring muscles are very predominantly fast-twitch fibre make up, thus they respond better to low reps.

Wow thanks for all the responses - I guess this wasn’t just a myth then and there is some truth involved.

I know that a lot of you are doing CW’s TBT. How are you incorporating deadlifts into this program? I would like to do sumo style and traditional ones every week but the reps for the 3 workouts are 8reps, 12reps and 18reps (from the top of my head).

Anybody know what the great man Chad himself recommends here?

I think you are fine to do deadlifts with as many reps as you like. Its just important that you reset after each rep to ensure that your form is good. High rep deadlifts and bad form is definately bad news.

Personally, I don’t like going much higher than 5 reps on deads, so when I want to do an exercise that I can do higher reps with and is similar to the deadlift, I do power cleans. Just a suggestion if you’re trying to find a substitute higher rep exercise.

Now power clean i for sure dont think you should go over 5 reps on. It requires way more balance and cooridnation than the deadlift thus the more reps you do the worse your form gets. You could do dumbbell or kettlbell power cleans for high reps though, they are great for cardio.

[quote]Breakdown wrote:
Wow thanks for all the responses - I guess this wasn’t just a myth then and there is some truth involved.

I know that a lot of you are doing CW’s TBT. How are you incorporating deadlifts into this program? I would like to do sumo style and traditional ones every week but the reps for the 3 workouts are 8reps, 12reps and 18reps (from the top of my head).

Anybody know what the great man Chad himself recommends here?[/quote]

For the TBT routine, of course there are many possibilities for including deadlifts, but here’s what Id recommend:

-Back extensions on the highest rep day
-stiff legged deadlifts on the medium rep day
-traditional or sumo style deadlifts on the heavy day.

I believe that the more reps you are going to do, the simpler the exercise should be that you’re doing, as it’s hard to keep focus on proper form when you feel like you’re about ready to puke or pass out from exhaustion!

To say that one should never perform greater than a certain number of reps in a particular exercise is absurd. There are plenty of instances where a person would want to do more than five reps in the deadlift or power clean–while learning the movements, for example. Even in work sets a >5 rep protocol is fine; it is a matter of managing fatigue. There is no reason why a trainee would even have to come anywhere near failure during a 10 rep set of power cleans so that balance and form would become a concern. And if it one were to lift enough that it would be a concern, then that is where focus, discipline and hard work come into play?things that should be encouraged in weight training, not avoided. Lastly, it would be beneficial in ?greasing the groove? of the CNS for the movement, which would assist the trainee during heavier attempts.

In the end it’s a question of training goals and preferences. As I stated earlier, I simply prefer to keep my deadlift reps lower, and my power clean reps higher. This is due to objective factors such as economy of motion, as well as subjective factors, ie, I just plain like it that way.

imo the deadlift is a 1-rep exercise. you lift ‘dead’ weight off the floor…hence the name. the lifting portion is what matters on this move. i think tate recommended if you wanna do high rep deads (conventional or sumo), then stand up between each rep…meaning, set up, lift the bar, put the bar down, stand up without the bar, go back down to setup for rep #2, etc. this way you have a true deadlift for every rep, instead of every rep after rep #1 being a ‘bounced off the floor’ deadlift. something to consider…

[quote]StrongMan wrote:
Breakdown wrote:
I picked up the idea from somewhere that you shouldn’t do any more than about 5 reps on the deadlift. Is this just another weight training myth? I want to incorporate sumo and traditional ones into weeks 5-8 of TBT.
Thanks for any help

Whether it’s wrong or not, my lifting parnter and I are on the 2nd week of Chads TBT, which includes 2 sets of 15 on deads. I gotta tell you I was suckin wind after finishing those sets@250. These are standard deadlifts, not sumo. I would like some assistance on the sumo form.
[/quote]

I did these as well in the TBT program with no problems at all… with the exception of some very wobbly legs at the end of the workout! As others have said in this thread leave your ego out of it and choose a sensible weight, reset at the beginning of each rep and really concentrate on good technique, if you lose your technique drop back the weight some more until you get it right.