T Nation

Masters Track and Field

I have benefited tremendously from the loads of info on T Nation. It is truly unbelievable that it is FREE! In addition to the strength training info I am looking for specific training info for Masters Track and Field athletes. If anyone has come across a good source for T&F training, specifically for Masters level (Masters meaning one of the main goals is to compete without getting hurt!!) and wouldn?t mind passing it on to me, it is appreciated.

[quote]lawakua wrote:
I have benefited tremendously from the loads of info on T Nation. It is truly unbelievable that it is FREE! In addition to the strength training info I am looking for specific training info for Masters Track and Field athletes. If anyone has come across a good source for T&F training, specifically for Masters level (Masters meaning one of the main goals is to compete without getting hurt!!) and wouldn?t mind passing it on to me, it is appreciated.[/quote]

lawakua-

Good for you in sticking with T&F! I was wondering if I would ever see another Track-junkie on this site… here you are!

What events do you compete in? Any throws? I am only 3 years out of college, but was a national level hammer and discus thrower. I got training tips from Jud Logan, Lance Deal, and various other Olympic caliber athletes (we had no formal throws coaching). So, I have designed my own successful training programs from scratch during college and now I run a successful HS program. I’m also a professional personal trainer, so maybe I can help you.

You are right - you want to stay in shape, stay competitive, but more importantly, stay healthy! I would design a program based on just a few basic compound movements and some running (depending on your event). I would look at a press and a pull for the upper body, an Olympic movement and a strenght movement for the lower body, some core work with a medicine ball, and some sprinting (at higher or lower intensity as up to you).

Maybe something like this:

(loading starts at about 80%1RM and should be progressively added 5-10 lbs per set, NEVER going to failure)

Day 1, back squat and hammie work 5X3, core work 3x10.

Day 2, event work and sprint intervals (50-200m)

Day 3, clean-press 5X3 and core work 3x6-8 (medicine ball throws, swiss ball work, etc - I used to love decline weighted sit-ups. Those built an iron gut!)

Day 4, event work and agilities

Day 5, flat bench and row 5X3, core work 3x10.

Day 6, off

Day 7, compete

Or, a total body workout twice a week would be plenty.

(loading starts at about 80%1RM and should be progressively added 10-15 lbs per set, NEVER going to failure)

Day 1, clean-press, bench press, DL, 3X3, core work 3x10.

Day 2, sprints and event work

day 3, event work, lower intensity

Day 4, back squat, incline press, vertical rows, 3X3, core work 3x10.

Day 5, agility work, event work

Day 6, off

Day 7 compete.

With each of these w/o’s, starting weights per set should start at your second set weight of last week’s, then progress, but stop short of failure if you can’t complete a set. This is done for 3 weeks, then a 1 week of “active rest” (event work and light running only) is done. Then, week 5 should be started with week 3 loads, going for another 3 weeks of progressive overload. Just keep the 3,1,3,1 cycles.

I’m sure you’ll get some other advice regarding athletics on this site, but this 3 on, 1 off cycle is common among elite tracksters. It helps prevent over-training and helps you to compete with more energy. That last thing you want to do is let your weight training interfere with your event!

Get back to me if you are in any throwing events - I have a whole bag of goodies that would help you out!

TopSirloin

Top Sirloin (Great name by the way)
Thanks for the response. I certainly did not expect a response so quick or with as much info as you have provided. Thanks a ton.

First of all, no I don’t do any throws. At 5’7" and 175 lbs. I don’t throw heavy things very far. I am a sprinter and plan to compete in the 100M and 200M, maybe the long jump. These are the events of my past, although I can’t say I am just out of college as yourself. I have not competed for over 10 years and have made the age to be eligible for Master T&F and thought what a great way to be motivated to train by having a competition to look forward to every so often. I am not even concerned about being terribly competitve but would not mind doing well. I am a journeyman strength trainer and have been consistent in my efforts for many years and have decent strength(currently about a 350 lb squat and 270 lb bench). I have a Masters in Ex. Phys, had all the certs (NSCA CSCS, ACSM, ACE)although I have not kept them current and coached HS T&F for 10 years (though not on the past 6 years). Anyway, after all that explanation my strength program looks very much what you have outlined and I feel pretty good about that. I am really looking specifically for speed drills, running technique drills, mobility drills, etc, as well as looking at suggestions for training volume for an older athlete trying to re-enter competition for personal pleasure. As we all do I tend to recall the volumes of work I could do at 17-21 years old and try to apply them to now in some form only to find myself dissappointed (and sometimes broken) when I try. As Coach Staley has said before we may be able to coach others but we are often the worst coach for ourselves.

Since you offered some great advice here is my advice as a bit of pay back. Since you have recently finished your college T&F career if you have any desire to continue to compete as you approach Masters age train to keep up what ever speed/explosive charecteristics you now have. I have been able to get stronger over the years but have not trained for speed and it seems that speed is the charecteristic I have lost the most.

Anyway, great to hear from you and thanks for the advice. I like the 3 on, 1 off approach. That I am not doing and would like to give it a try.

Charlie Francis has the best training info for sprinting on the net in my opinion.

I have a couple of his books, and his information is top notch. I’m sure others will chime in saying it is the premier site to go to as well.

I agree about Charlie Francis, but I doubt he gives out totally comprehensive training packages for free! If he does, then get after it! If not, I wouldn’t worry about it for two reasons: one, you are in it for the love of it and to have fun; two, you can’t invest the time/energy it takes to perform at the level that his coaching would require. But, maybe you could modify it…

If I were you, I would put most of my energy into weight training and staying in shape, with just “some” speed work. Meaning, if you get into the Olympic lifts (clean and snatch) you will be creating a more powerful body which will certainly help your sprint times.

I would hit a few intervals, using your heartrate as the guide for rest. Meaning, have a session that is only at 90% of your max speed for anaerobic conditioning. Recovery intervals based on you heart rate getting back down to about 70% of your max (220-age). Then, on the speed days, hitting a few with near full recovery between intervals - heart rate down to 50% of max on recovery.

As far as sprinter drills, you can probably find lots in books at Barnes and Nobles (just grab a coffee and read a couple chapters right there in the store like I do - taking notes of course!). But, from my limited sprint knowledge, the event is a straight shot, therefore not that dynamic. Powerful, but not dynamic. Therefore, I doubt doing tons of plyos (besides being very destructive when done too often) would give you any increase in performance. If you were a hurdler, maybe. But, besides just some GPP work and agilities (line hops, corner-back drills, etc) I don’t know if you really need to get into a huge variety of cross-training.

Based on what I know about sport specific work, I know it’s best to work your training week in this order: speed, power, strength, fitness. Training for increasing your turn-over early in the week. Training for anaerobic fitness later.

I’m sure I could prescribe a program to you, but I wouldn’t be that confident in it being optimally effective. Not to mention you are at the masters level I would hate to suggest something that would be too hard/too light for your needs.

As far as my throwing… I think I am done. Even though I walk around my house sometimes flicking my arm as if I just launched one… :wink: … but, I have so much going on that it’s just not a priority anymore. As you well know, if you don’t use it, you will lose it! I can step in and chuck a HS disc far enough to get some ooos and aaahs, but that’s about it! A 2K disc would be KILLER on my shoulder and back without throwing it nearly every day… that’s okay, old dreams fade and new ones begin. That’s thing I never stop - dreaming.

Good luck!

TS

Thanks Sirloin. It’s appreciated and best of luck to you.