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Massage Therapy vs Physical Therapy?

Is massage therapy more effective than physical therapy for muscular skeletal issues?

There seems to be more of a placebo effect in physical therapy (RICE, compression, bands, electrolysis, exercise prescription, etc…) With massage therapy it appears more concerned with hands on tissue quality improvement.

[quote]nickj_777 wrote:
Is massage therapy more effective than physical therapy for muscular skeletal issues?

There seems to be more of a placebo effect in physical therapy (RICE, compression, bands, electrolysis, exercise prescription, etc…) With massage therapy it appears more concerned with hands on tissue quality improvement.[/quote]

lulzzzzz is this even a serious thread, please go

who needs evidence

How are any of the things you listed placebos? Every modality used by a manual therapist has a known or theorized physiological mechanism of how it acts on the body.

Well, obviously getting a doctorate in PT is a load of magic and hogwash. 7 years of schooling finally allows a licensed PT to use the placebo effect on patients.

If you don’t believe there is a lot of bs methods in physical therapy you’re in denial. My point was that at least manual therapy is done by massage therapist who can identify tissue improvement with their hands.

If for example someone has a meniscus injury are glute clam shells really going to fix the injury site and let the person get back to squatting to go to the washroom? Would it be as effective as doing glute ham raises, back extensions, petersen step ups, romanian deadlifts, vmo sled drags, prowler pushing, etc…?

If someone has a shoulder injury are band exercises going to alleviate long term muscle dysfunction and get him back pressing?

Kelly Starrett is good because he combines so many different things to achieve his goal and he considers himself a strength and conditioning coach.

I have been in physical therapy rooms and the PT has 3-4 patients so they prescribe basic exercises and or icing while a manual therapist allots a time to work on one patient at a time.

Okay, then which specific methods are BS?

The answer to your two questions are: it depends.

Your Kelly Starrett comment is laughable.

I can’t speak for that PT you went to that one time where you saw that one thing. I’ve never treated multiple patients simultaneously (although I’m not a PT) and my friends who are PTs don’t treat multiple patients simultaneously.

Massage has different indications than physical therapy.

That being said, physical therapy does, in fact, use massage as a modality… evidence based practice is a big thing in physio (at least in canada) and they dont use modalities which have no literature, or have not been used clinically with great effect. Massage therapy on the other hand uses a lot of outdated ideas, particularly about fascia, and is more likely to use alternative therapies such as reiki or energy healing… not that there isnt anecdotal evidence for those modalities, but Im not comfortable using something like reiki in my treatments.

If youre concerned about the quality of your physio or the physio is treating 3-4 patients at once… find a new physio! Look for manual physios, they use hands on techniques that massage therapists cant, as well as massage, as well as therapeutic exercise and electromodalities!

Or come see an AT, we do all of that too.

Kelly Starrett, for the record, has packaged basic physio school into a pretty book I did not learn much from he had to say.

[quote]Joeyc123 wrote:
Well, obviously getting a doctorate in PT is a load of magic and hogwash. 7 years of schooling finally allows a licensed PT to use the placebo effect on patients.[/quote]

yay!!! since there isnt a ship loads worth of RCTs on everybody part proving its effectiveness

The only load of hogwash is your guys logic/arguements

"f you don’t believe there is a lot of bs methods in physical therapy you’re in denial. My point was that at least manual therapy is done by massage therapist who can identify tissue improvement with their hands. "

strong comprehension of the term manual therapy

“who can identify tissue improvement with their hands”

hahahahahaha not even once, the only tissue improvement they are gon notice is that last 10 minutes that cost an extra 20 if ya no what im sayin. This is a subjective report, not measurable. Remember that little placebo thing you mentioned before.

“If for example someone has a meniscus injury are glute clam shells really going to fix the injury site and let the person get back to squatting to go to the washroom? Would it be as effective as doing glute ham raises, back extensions, petersen step ups, romanian deadlifts, vmo sled drags, prowler pushing, etc…?”

lol fix the injury site… … … … … …
Nothing is going to “fix the injury site” except if it is in the outer 1/3 and the body heals yourself plus some other potential add-ons which I am familiar with. I’m not even going to bother with your riveting exercise plan and narrow-minded clam shell statement. Meniscal injuries become pain free when the inflammation exits the joint.

“If someone has a shoulder injury are band exercises going to alleviate long term muscle dysfunction and get him back pressing?”

maybe, stupid question

“Kelly Starrett is good because he combines so many different things to achieve his goal and he considers himself a strength and conditioning coach.”

Kstarr is OK, cross fit is a joke for athletes but he is good with biomechanics, his capsular mobilization stuff is horrendous for the hips and shoulders, YAY for instability!!!

“I have been in physical therapy rooms and the PT has 3-4 patients so they prescribe basic exercises and or icing while a manual therapist allots a time to work on one patient at a time. [/quote]”

cool story bro