T Nation

Mass Building & Athletic Performance

Ross Enamait has a new article and video demo on this topic. I thought I would share with T-Nation. The video is quite inspiring and worth a look.

Now THAT is training for a fighter!

Cool video-the guy is out of his mind as far as athletic ability, and he is right on with his experiment and ideas.

Glad to see my advice has paid off.

For a weight-class athlete, weight gain isn’t always the solution to one’s problem, but it sure can help sometimes.

It’s a weird situation for a fighter, be it a boxer, a wrestler, a Judo-ka, a BJJ competitor. You need to get more explosive, more powerful but at the same time you need the ability to go for 3x5 minute rounds or 12x3 minute rounds and so on at 100% intensity.

More strength=more muscle. Which means either a) you lose bodyfat which can hurt certain athletes in terms of cutting weight or b) you go up a weight class.

I dunno if this has anything to do with the original post, but it’s just my observations on the subject.

[quote]t3h_Squirr3l wrote:
For a weight-class athlete, weight gain isn’t always the solution to one’s problem, but it sure can help sometimes.

It’s a weird situation for a fighter, be it a boxer, a wrestler, a Judo-ka, a BJJ competitor. You need to get more explosive, more powerful but at the same time you need the ability to go for 3x5 minute rounds or 12x3 minute rounds and so on at 100% intensity.

More strength=more muscle. Which means either a) you lose bodyfat which can hurt certain athletes in terms of cutting weight or b) you go up a weight class.

I dunno if this has anything to do with the original post, but it’s just my observations on the subject.[/quote]

And your point is?

In addition a strength increase does not always come hand in had with a muscle increase.

[quote]t3h_Squirr3l wrote:
For a weight-class athlete, weight gain isn’t always the solution to one’s problem, but it sure can help sometimes.

It’s a weird situation for a fighter, be it a boxer, a wrestler, a Judo-ka, a BJJ competitor. You need to get more explosive, more powerful but at the same time you need the ability to go for 3x5 minute rounds or 12x3 minute rounds and so on at 100% intensity.

More strength=more muscle. Which means either a) you lose bodyfat which can hurt certain athletes in terms of cutting weight or b) you go up a weight class.

I dunno if this has anything to do with the original post, but it’s just my observations on the subject.[/quote]

It’s rare to see anyone in amateur level to professional sports who did some training that was worth a damn that has added a little muscle and it has hurt them.

If you measure the things that ross outlines… like if you need to stay in a weight class etc and your conditioning level doesn’t change then adding some size through the proper mechanisms can be a good thing.

That video is FUCKING AWESOME. Thanks for sharing it. This video gives everyone a little glimpse of our capabilities. I was seriously impressed.