T Nation

Martial Arts Academy Costs?

I’m curious what is the going rate for these places. Low level pro fighter instructors, nice facilities, and unlimited classes.

150$ a month? What is with the high flat fee and no variable rate based on class attendance? Is that a standard business model?

Depends on the gym. Some charge $200 a month, but last I checked Virgil Hill’s gym in Oakland was $30 a month to work out and $50 with a trainer (some years ago, but still.)

My gym charges $69 per month for a combination of boxing classes, strength/conditioning, and sparring. Everything is geared towards fighting - the classes are boxing, not boxercise, the strength and conditioning is designed for strength endurance, and sparring is…well, sparring.

I would not pay more than that. Anything more than $80 - $90 a month and I’m really wondering what the motivations are. Boxing is a little different than most MA’s though, in that if you love the sport, a lot of guys will train you for nothing, or next to nothing, just because it’s what you do.

TMA’s are way more notorious for charging exorbitant rates.

Jujitsu tends to be expensive, especially if they are a ‘franchise’ (I call Gracie Barra that, but I don’t think it’s totally a bad thing: it allows you to train all over pretty easily), the range I see is about $130-$230 a month.

Boxing, and ring-sport striking (kick-boxing, MT) tend to be cheaper, in the $50-$90 a month range around here.

This is all for “full membership” and unlimited classes.

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
Depends on the gym. Some charge $200 a month, but last I checked Virgil Hill’s gym in Oakland was $30 a month to work out and $50 with a trainer (some years ago, but still.)

My gym charges $69 per month for a combination of boxing classes, strength/conditioning, and sparring. Everything is geared towards fighting - the classes are boxing, not boxercise, the strength and conditioning is designed for strength endurance, and sparring is…well, sparring.

I would not pay more than that. Anything more than $80 - $90 a month and I’m really wondering what the motivations are. Boxing is a little different than most MA’s though, in that if you love the sport, a lot of guys will train you for nothing, or next to nothing, just because it’s what you do.

TMA’s are way more notorious for charging exorbitant rates.

[/quote]

Thanks for the Intel. The rates were exorbitant. On top of that I have a membership at a BB gym. There was a little negotiation about the rate, I offered 70$ a month for two classes a week and that was a no go. It was required that one of the class be BJJ. BJJ=gay

I think the motivation is money. I live in area with some very affluent people, however I am definitely not one of them.

[quote]Captnoblivious wrote:

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
Depends on the gym. Some charge $200 a month, but last I checked Virgil Hill’s gym in Oakland was $30 a month to work out and $50 with a trainer (some years ago, but still.)

My gym charges $69 per month for a combination of boxing classes, strength/conditioning, and sparring. Everything is geared towards fighting - the classes are boxing, not boxercise, the strength and conditioning is designed for strength endurance, and sparring is…well, sparring.

I would not pay more than that. Anything more than $80 - $90 a month and I’m really wondering what the motivations are. Boxing is a little different than most MA’s though, in that if you love the sport, a lot of guys will train you for nothing, or next to nothing, just because it’s what you do.

TMA’s are way more notorious for charging exorbitant rates.

[/quote]

Thanks for the Intel. The rates were exorbitant. On top of that I have a membership at a BB gym. There was a little negation about the rate, I offered 70$ a month for two classes a week and that was a no go. It was required that one of the class be BJJ. BJJ=gay

I think the motivation is money. I live in area with some very affluent people, however I am definitely not one of them.

[/quote]

I don’t know, the more I see the business-side, the more sympathy I have for the associated costs.

Jujitsu has an insanely high attrition rate. The TKD McDojo, for example, has an easier time keeping your standard “I want to train 2-3x a week” laymen: it’s not full contact, you’re not likely to get hurt or ever really be tested (beaten), and there is a fast and easy belt system to tell people how great they are and keep people motivated.

Contrast that with a BJJ gym where a good chunk of the folks won’t come back after a couple classes of live rolling.

[quote]Spartiates wrote:

Contrast that with a BJJ gym where a good chunk of the folks won’t come back after a couple classes of live rolling.[/quote]

Agreed. Same with boxing. Once you get pushed to (and then past) the point where you want to puke - and that’s just in training - a lot of guys don’t come back. Sparring is the same thing… nothing makes you reevaluate your choice of hobbies like taking a right hand from someone who knows how to throw it.

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:

[quote]Spartiates wrote:

Contrast that with a BJJ gym where a good chunk of the folks won’t come back after a couple classes of live rolling.[/quote]

Agreed. Same with boxing. Once you get pushed to (and then past) the point where you want to puke - and that’s just in training - a lot of guys don’t come back. Sparring is the same thing… nothing makes you reevaluate your choice of hobbies like taking a right hand from someone who knows how to throw it. [/quote]

Yep, this is truth. The only reason it survives as a sport is community funding, peppercorn rents, and dedicated people giving their time for free, on top of a hard day’s work. Here, I pay around £30/month to train 3-4 nights a week (although I’m coaching a fair bit now so it’s less than that).

[quote]Spartiates wrote:

[quote]Captnoblivious wrote:

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
Depends on the gym. Some charge $200 a month, but last I checked Virgil Hill’s gym in Oakland was $30 a month to work out and $50 with a trainer (some years ago, but still.)

My gym charges $69 per month for a combination of boxing classes, strength/conditioning, and sparring. Everything is geared towards fighting - the classes are boxing, not boxercise, the strength and conditioning is designed for strength endurance, and sparring is…well, sparring.

I would not pay more than that. Anything more than $80 - $90 a month and I’m really wondering what the motivations are. Boxing is a little different than most MA’s though, in that if you love the sport, a lot of guys will train you for nothing, or next to nothing, just because it’s what you do.

TMA’s are way more notorious for charging exorbitant rates.

[/quote]

Thanks for the Intel. The rates were exorbitant. On top of that I have a membership at a BB gym. There was a little negation about the rate, I offered 70$ a month for two classes a week and that was a no go. It was required that one of the class be BJJ. BJJ=gay

I think the motivation is money. I live in area with some very affluent people, however I am definitely not one of them.

[/quote]

I don’t know, the more I see the business-side, the more sympathy I have for the associated costs.

Jujitsu has an insanely high attrition rate. The TKD McDojo, for example, has an easier time keeping your standard “I want to train 2-3x a week” laymen: it’s not full contact, you’re not likely to get hurt or ever really be tested (beaten), and there is a fast and easy belt system to tell people how great they are and keep people motivated.

Contrast that with a BJJ gym where a good chunk of the folks won’t come back after a couple classes of live rolling.[/quote]

Oh I am sure renting a nice space, equipping it, insurance, utilities, and associated costs are damn expensive. Obviously, there has to be a balance between dedication to the sport and making a profit.

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
nothing makes you reevaluate your choice of hobbies like taking a right hand from someone who knows how to throw it. [/quote]

LOL. I have been in that situation a bunch, either doing stand-up or BJJ where I have to tell myself that I actually paid money for this.

[quote]Spartiates wrote:
Jujitsu tends to be expensive, especially if they are a ‘franchise’ (I call Gracie Barra that, but I don’t think it’s totally a bad thing: it allows you to train all over pretty easily), the range I see is about $130-$230 a month.

Boxing, and ring-sport striking (kick-boxing, MT) tend to be cheaper, in the $50-$90 a month range around here.

This is all for “full membership” and unlimited classes.[/quote]

I think the place did have a franchise.

IMO (and keep in mind that I am a school owner, so my perspective is at least semi-biased), people tend to look at MA (or combat sports in general) instruction costs from a very strange perspective.

Let’s say that you were going to either attend or send your kids to a University to get educated, earn their degree, and then hopefully get a job with that education/degree. Would you simply look for the cheapest place that you could find? Or would you pick the best school that you could realistically afford? Why the hate for martial art schools that take pride in their product and charge what they believe is a fair value for it?

In what other profession are people expected to give away their knowledge for next to nothing, or charge peanuts for their work? Does anyone see plumbers doing that? How about Carpenters? Auto mechanics? Chefs? Graphic designers? Seriously, why are MA and combat sports instructors held to such a different standard then?

Like someone mentioned before, the instructor has to pay up front for all of the equipment in the school (just buying enough Jiu-Jitsu mats to cover a decent sized floor space can set you back a few grand, then add in pads, kick shields, extra gloves, shin guards and headgear for students that need loaners until they can buy their own, training knives, sticks, and guns) which represents a large chunk of money, then add the monthly cost of rent, heat, electricity, phone, advertising, liability insurance, any affiliation dues that might apply and you’ve got quite the financial hole that you need to balance out with training fees. Now add in a ring and/or a cage and you’re even deeper in the red. Finally add in mortgage/rent for your house, food, gas, utilities, and other usual living expenses, and well, hopefully people see my point by now.

Then you’re supposed to charge people $50 for unlimited classes a month? Sure, maybe if you’ve got 300 students right off the bat and they all stay with you for decades (or at least the number stays that high or higher) you might be able to charge that little and make that work. But let’s say you’ve got classes 3 days a week at 2 hours per class. So 24 hours a month at $50. So that’s $2 per hour that you’re getting paid by each student. And realistically, if we’re talking about aspiring pro fighters, that is not even close to enough training time, so let’s say you even bumped it up to 6 hours 3 days a week (which would be about the minimum), so now you’re down to around 67 cents per hour. Again, you’re going to need quite a few students to make that a sustainable business.

Now, I’m not saying that one has to charge $1,000 per month like Lloyd Irvin charges his pro fighters. But there is a happy medium where the instructor can cover their expenses, make an acceptable living, and the students can still afford the training. That exact number will vary some depending on the area where the school is located. Obviously if the rent for the space and living quarters is dirt cheap, and the students are all strapped for money, then the prices will have to be lower. Or if the rent is high and students more affluent the fees will reflect that.

Also, these are realizations and observations that I did not make initially as a student, but have only come to light as a business owner. So, I wouldn’t expect other students to have thought of these realities themselves. Hopefully my perspective will help the OP understand why schools charge what they do though.

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
IMO (and keep in mind that I am a school owner, so my perspective is at least semi-biased), people tend to look at MA (or combat sports in general) instruction costs from a very strange perspective.

Let’s say that you were going to either attend or send your kids to a University to get educated, earn their degree, and then hopefully get a job with that education/degree. Would you simply look for the cheapest place that you could find? Or would you pick the best school that you could realistically afford? Why the hate for martial art schools that take pride in their product and charge what they believe is a fair value for it?

In what other profession are people expected to give away their knowledge for next to nothing, or charge peanuts for their work? Does anyone see plumbers doing that? How about Carpenters? Auto mechanics? Chefs? Graphic designers? Seriously, why are MA and combat sports instructors held to such a different standard then?

Like someone mentioned before, the instructor has to pay up front for all of the equipment in the school (just buying enough Jiu-Jitsu mats to cover a decent sized floor space can set you back a few grand, then add in pads, kick shields, extra gloves, shin guards and headgear for students that need loaners until they can buy their own, training knives, sticks, and guns) which represents a large chunk of money, then add the monthly cost of rent, heat, electricity, phone, advertising, liability insurance, any affiliation dues that might apply and you’ve got quite the financial hole that you need to balance out with training fees. Now add in a ring and/or a cage and you’re even deeper in the red. Finally add in mortgage/rent for your house, food, gas, utilities, and other usual living expenses, and well, hopefully people see my point by now.

Then you’re supposed to charge people $50 for unlimited classes a month? Sure, maybe if you’ve got 300 students right off the bat and they all stay with you for decades (or at least the number stays that high or higher) you might be able to charge that little and make that work. But let’s say you’ve got classes 3 days a week at 2 hours per class. So 24 hours a month at $50. So that’s $2 per hour that you’re getting paid by each student. And realistically, if we’re talking about aspiring pro fighters, that is not even close to enough training time, so let’s say you even bumped it up to 6 hours 3 days a week (which would be about the minimum), so now you’re down to around 67 cents per hour. Again, you’re going to need quite a few students to make that a sustainable business.

Now, I’m not saying that one has to charge $1,000 per month like Lloyd Irvin charges his pro fighters. But there is a happy medium where the instructor can cover their expenses, make an acceptable living, and the students can still afford the training. That exact number will vary some depending on the area where the school is located. Obviously if the rent for the space and living quarters is dirt cheap, and the students are all strapped for money, then the prices will have to be lower. Or if the rent is high and students more affluent the fees will reflect that.

Also, these are realizations and observations that I did not make initially as a student, but have only come to light as a business owner. So, I wouldn’t expect other students to have thought of these realities themselves. Hopefully my perspective will help the OP understand why schools charge what they do though.[/quote]

I think this is a very valid perspective, and also well reasoned. I understand that from a business perspective, there are base level costs of living that running a business has to cover.

That said, in the UK at least, community sports centres are often supported via the state. Boxing, certainly, tends to gets government grants that cover many of the costs associated with set up and daily running. Coaches then give their time for free, at the amateur level at least. They also charge low level pros relatively little for their time because their facilities are paid for, so there are few overheads to cover. Obviously the costs associated change as (if) the fighter goes up in the pro stakes. As Sento says, there is no reason that a good coach shouldn’t expect to be well paid for guiding a fighter to success, and the financial rewards that involves.

I think that one area where there is a debate in your reasoning is the college analogy. I agree that it makes sense to maximise what you learn, and where that learning can take you. In certain things, like education, I understand why parents who can, want to pay for their kids to get ahead. The difference in the UK at least, when it comes to combat sports/RMAs, is that it is possible for most city people to get very well educated locally in a discipline like boxing, for about £30/month. With that in mind, and appreciating that it may not be the same scenario in the US, I could personally never justify (or afford) to train in a more expensive discipline.

It also seems that a lot of gyms capitalise on the fan-boy culture that MMA has generated, and charge them a lot of money to be in a position to tell their mates how tough they are. It is a little like the Mcdojos of yesteryear, in that you can pay a lot of money for not very much, and it can be difficult for the uninitiated to tell when their coach is full of shit. Clearly, some gyms like yours (judging by the quality of what you post here) offer a high grade product, and feel justified in charging a higher rate. But I’d be willing to bet that more than 90% of gyms out there are claiming the same service and delivering nothing like the same quality for the price. It’s no wonder the general opinion is that MA gyms are ripping you off.

I’m paying $1100/year, up front and in cash for unlimited classes in two disciplines from well respected coaches. They typically have 20-25 students in class at the times I go, and there are two mat rooms and a cage running (not always with in class students, but always dues paying members). The coaches supplement their income with private lessons and retail equipment and apparel sales. Even then, I can’t imagine any of the gym owners are getting rich off this. I feel like I got a good deal, mostly because I paid up front and was serious. I think class fees can get over $1600/year for one style if paid by the month.

Part of the cost will always be location. You can, will, and have to charge more if your school is in Manhattan, for example. As far as BJJ schools they can vary based on who is teaching as well as how many classes are offered (and of course, location). If a school is open 6, or even 7, days a week and classes are available throughout the day, i.e., it’s a full time operation and the school owner is treating like a full time job, then he will probably charge more. Is that good or bad?

It depends on how serious you are about learning and training. Look at a fitness/weightlifting gym. You probably wouldn’t join one that was open 3 days a week for a few hours each time if you were serious about getting in shape. And you would pay more to join a gym that was more accessible. A BJJ school that has classes throughout the day, every day, means you can train as much as your schedule and body will allow vs how the school’s schedule allows you to train.

There is a Judo club about one minute from my house (it’s based in the junior high). It is run by a middle school teacher under the auspices of the city’s park and rec dept. It charges like 10 dollars a month. I assume the person running it is competent but she is not world class. Also, it has classes twice a week and they are short by BJJ standards.

Compare that to a BJJ school that is run by a world champion in BJJ, and might even have mma experience, and is open 6-7 days a week. Marcelo Garcia not only teaches but he rolls with everyone for example.

If you look at Judo in this country and how Americans fare in international competition vs how they fare in BJJ you will see that Americans are making gains at the highest levels of BJJ faster than Americans in Judo and Judo had a few decades head start. If anything Judoka here are falling behind. Americans have done well in wrestling because wrestlers train every day here because they can train every day. The same with boxing. The difference though between wrestling, boxing and BJJ is that BJJ does not get any public funding or private donations so it has to charge more.

Having said that, still be wary of pricing. Be wary of upselling. Lloyd Irvin is a scumbag of the highest order (and not just for his business practices) and some schools use his shady tactics to get you into bad (for you, not them) contracts and pay more for “special” classes for the “select” few. While on the subject of Lloyd Irvin, Sento mentioned he charges 1,000 an hour or something for pro fighters, that is not true. He does not really train pro fighters. He offers his services (a “consultation” usually) for free to get the photo op and a another name to put on the list of “his” fighters. The numbers he throws out for the prices of his privates and other services are not real. They are just put out there to create a perception of value.

[quote]LondonBoxer123 wrote:

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
IMO (and keep in mind that I am a school owner, so my perspective is at least semi-biased), people tend to look at MA (or combat sports in general) instruction costs from a very strange perspective.

Let’s say that you were going to either attend or send your kids to a University to get educated, earn their degree, and then hopefully get a job with that education/degree. Would you simply look for the cheapest place that you could find? Or would you pick the best school that you could realistically afford? Why the hate for martial art schools that take pride in their product and charge what they believe is a fair value for it?

In what other profession are people expected to give away their knowledge for next to nothing, or charge peanuts for their work? Does anyone see plumbers doing that? How about Carpenters? Auto mechanics? Chefs? Graphic designers? Seriously, why are MA and combat sports instructors held to such a different standard then?

Like someone mentioned before, the instructor has to pay up front for all of the equipment in the school (just buying enough Jiu-Jitsu mats to cover a decent sized floor space can set you back a few grand, then add in pads, kick shields, extra gloves, shin guards and headgear for students that need loaners until they can buy their own, training knives, sticks, and guns) which represents a large chunk of money, then add the monthly cost of rent, heat, electricity, phone, advertising, liability insurance, any affiliation dues that might apply and you’ve got quite the financial hole that you need to balance out with training fees. Now add in a ring and/or a cage and you’re even deeper in the red. Finally add in mortgage/rent for your house, food, gas, utilities, and other usual living expenses, and well, hopefully people see my point by now.

Then you’re supposed to charge people $50 for unlimited classes a month? Sure, maybe if you’ve got 300 students right off the bat and they all stay with you for decades (or at least the number stays that high or higher) you might be able to charge that little and make that work. But let’s say you’ve got classes 3 days a week at 2 hours per class. So 24 hours a month at $50. So that’s $2 per hour that you’re getting paid by each student. And realistically, if we’re talking about aspiring pro fighters, that is not even close to enough training time, so let’s say you even bumped it up to 6 hours 3 days a week (which would be about the minimum), so now you’re down to around 67 cents per hour. Again, you’re going to need quite a few students to make that a sustainable business.

Now, I’m not saying that one has to charge $1,000 per month like Lloyd Irvin charges his pro fighters. But there is a happy medium where the instructor can cover their expenses, make an acceptable living, and the students can still afford the training. That exact number will vary some depending on the area where the school is located. Obviously if the rent for the space and living quarters is dirt cheap, and the students are all strapped for money, then the prices will have to be lower. Or if the rent is high and students more affluent the fees will reflect that.

Also, these are realizations and observations that I did not make initially as a student, but have only come to light as a business owner. So, I wouldn’t expect other students to have thought of these realities themselves. Hopefully my perspective will help the OP understand why schools charge what they do though.[/quote]

I think this is a very valid perspective, and also well reasoned. I understand that from a business perspective, there are base level costs of living that running a business has to cover.

That said, in the UK at least, community sports centres are often supported via the state. Boxing, certainly, tends to gets government grants that cover many of the costs associated with set up and daily running. Coaches then give their time for free, at the amateur level at least. They also charge low level pros relatively little for their time because their facilities are paid for, so there are few overheads to cover. Obviously the costs associated change as (if) the fighter goes up in the pro stakes. As Sento says, there is no reason that a good coach shouldn’t expect to be well paid for guiding a fighter to success, and the financial rewards that involves.

I think that one area where there is a debate in your reasoning is the college analogy. I agree that it makes sense to maximise what you learn, and where that learning can take you. In certain things, like education, I understand why parents who can, want to pay for their kids to get ahead. The difference in the UK at least, when it comes to combat sports/RMAs, is that it is possible for most city people to get very well educated locally in a discipline like boxing, for about �£30/month. With that in mind, and appreciating that it may not be the same scenario in the US, I could personally never justify (or afford) to train in a more expensive discipline.

It also seems that a lot of gyms capitalise on the fan-boy culture that MMA has generated, and charge them a lot of money to be in a position to tell their mates how tough they are. It is a little like the Mcdojos of yesteryear, in that you can pay a lot of money for not very much, and it can be difficult for the uninitiated to tell when their coach is full of shit. Clearly, some gyms like yours (judging by the quality of what you post here) offer a high grade product, and feel justified in charging a higher rate. But I’d be willing to bet that more than 90% of gyms out there are claiming the same service and delivering nothing like the same quality for the price. It’s no wonder the general opinion is that MA gyms are ripping you off. [/quote]

All totally valid points. There are some boxing programs in the US that do either get a break from the government (like those offered in YMCA’s, since that organization is categorized as a non profit and thus gets tax breaks and other financial breaks that come along with that status), or are funded by local or state governments (like rec departments, community centers, youth programs, etc…). And obviously, since these facilities are either non profit or state/locally run I would agree that one should expect to pay less for their services. There are some martial arts classes offered in these types of locations/scenarios as well, so the same pay rates would be expected.

I also completely agree with your observation that plenty of MA schools charge rates in accordance with high quality instruction and yet fail to deliver such instruction. That’s why I generally tell people shopping around for a good school to go try classes at a bunch of different places before signing up anywhere. Like you said, most consumers/potential students are not highly educated on what makes for a quality martial art, and thus aren’t going to recognize quality from crap without some sort of comparison. Just looking at price may have you wind up paying a very low fee and getting poor quality instruction, paying a lot and getting poor quality instruction, paying a lot and getting top level instruction, or low fees and getting very good instruction.

In the end you’ve got to shop around to see what the is the best deal that you can realistically afford and then make your informed choice/purchase; just like my college analogy. You also need to be honest with yourself about where you expect your MA/combat sports training to take you. You truly believe and are motivated enough to want to be champion of the world someday? Then maybe you’re willing to make the sacrifices to be able to afford training with Lloyd Irvin, Freddie Roach, or some other top level coach. If on the other hand you’re just doing it as a fun hobby, then maybe you will be fine with a lower quality of instruction for a cheaper rate.

I said he charges $1,000 per month for his pro fighters, not $1,000 per hour (which I agree would be ludicrous).

And perhaps you know more than I do about his business practices, but Brandon Vera, Phil Davis, JT Torres, and Dominic Cruz have all at one time trained under him (at least from the information that I have ever seen published). Vera actually started training with Irvin in BJJ right from the get go from what I understand. I would say that’s more than just taking pictures together.

Also, I wasn’t suggesting that people should necessarily follow Irvin’s business model, I was just using it as an example of the extreme high end of the training tuition spectrum.

[quote]devildog_jim wrote:
I’m paying $1100/year, up front and in cash for unlimited classes in two disciplines from well respected coaches. They typically have 20-25 students in class at the times I go, and there are two mat rooms and a cage running (not always with in class students, but always dues paying members). The coaches supplement their income with private lessons and retail equipment and apparel sales. Even then, I can’t imagine any of the gym owners are getting rich off this. I feel like I got a good deal, mostly because I paid up front and was serious. I think class fees can get over $1600/year for one style if paid by the month.[/quote]

Yes, like many repeat services, if you are willing to commit to a large number and pay up front for it you can usually get a better deal than if you pay as you go.

Pro fighters don’t pay gym due, its part of your reward for representing the gym. Even private gym like Suffer or death cluth, the fighters don’t pay to go. The head man, Mir and Lesanr foot the bill.

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
If on the other hand you’re just doing it as a fun hobby, then maybe you will be fine with a lower quality of instruction for a cheaper rate.[/quote]

You couldn’t be more spot on than a person needs to try multiple schools to see which instructor/s and environment fit your expectations. That’s going to be the case with all forms of MA and even boxing clubs. I personally have bounced around multiple schools and visit many more traveling for work and the schools I like going to are the ones where the egos are cheecked at the door. That maybe worth more than price but still $$$ will be the ultimate factor for most people.

My experience with that is pricing needs to go hand in hand with the head instructor’s experience level. In BJJ, pricing for me would have to be dependent on how close was your instructor from having his or her belt tied on by a Gracie or somebody with legit cred. Just my $.02.

Holy crap! Just rechecked Irvin’s school site and I must stand corrected. It says he charges $1,500 per hour for BJJ instruction, $1,800 per hour for BJJ + leg locks, and $2,500 per hour for “combat BJJ” (which I can only assume means BJJ for self defense)! Those are some exorbitant prices IMO, and it would be interesting to find out what say Greg Jackson, or Ricardo Liborio charge for the same services.