T Nation

Marine Tackles Bank Robber

http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/07/13/robbery.tackle.ap/index.html

This story made me laugh

Hoo-F**king_rah!

All we need now is the vid.

:slight_smile:

Held him down and lectured him, haha!

A fire extinguisher? HA!

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[quote]Mick28 wrote:
I wonder if the Marine realizes that he can be held personally liable if he did any harm to that bank robber when he took him down. There’s a lawyer around every corner. [/quote]

It is very sad when you live in a country where this is even possible. What kind of retarded “legal system” allows criminals to take legal action in such a case?

Good story nonetheless!

[quote]Mick28 wrote:
Granted, it was a very heroic act tackling the bank robber. But I’m not so sure that I’d do anything like that unless I was certain someone’s life was in jeopardy.

I wonder if the Marine realizes that he can be held personally liable if he did any harm to that bank robber when he took him down. There’s a lawyer around every corner. And the Marine is not covered by the banks insurance as he is not an employee.

Just a few thoughts for all of the kiddies out there who want to play hero. [/quote]

Well this is what separates him from people who think like this. A hero realizes the inherent risks and consequences of his actions but take action anyway. Some people will go through life without knowing what sacrifice means.

“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing” -Edmund Burke

What, you feel you should be able to do whatever the hell you want to a criminal in that scenario? I’m GLAD that criminals have that right.

[quote]SpeedStrength wrote:
What, you feel you should be able to do whatever the hell you want to a criminal in that scenario? I’m GLAD that criminals have that right. [/quote]

Yep, that’s pretty much exactly what I think. The minute you trample upon my rights you forfeit your own. Might makes right.

If you rob a bank and someone gouges out your eye or chops off your hand, you probably need a change of profession.

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[quote]SpeedStrength wrote:
What, you feel you should be able to do whatever the hell you want to a criminal in that scenario? I’m GLAD that criminals have that right. [/quote]

Who said anything about “whatever the hell you want” ?

Reign it in to within some reasonable boundaries and you might have a point, but even then, there is the implied risk of engaging in a dangerous activity.

Most criminal activity is dangerous. Don’t like the risks? Don’t engage in the activity. A.K.A.- “Live by the sword, Die by the sword”.

[quote]Mick28 wrote:
Very good sounding words, I like them. You could also throw in some dramatic music as well, and also cue the sunset. But reality sometimes gets in the way of the drama.

The individual in question would have to pay for his own lawyer to defend the suit. Let’s see…a prolonged law suit could cost in the neighborhood of 10-k, or better. And if the guy wins the suit the hero could lose his house, car, bank account, etc.

Well, that’s only if the hero actually owns something right? What if he’s worth nothing, then he can play hero with no repercussion, right?

Wrong.

Then if our hero loses the suit his wages are garnished. That means that if our hero takes home $500.00 per week the “bad guy” gets a nice big cut of that. Sometimes up to half (or better) depending on the state.

Look, I’m not saying that you should stand by and allow the criminal element to take over in any given situation. But look really carefully before you leap, as that leap might just cost you everything that you have.
[/quote]
Since we’re playing substitute realities here, how about this?

The police see no evidence of malicius intent, and thank the hero, sending him on his way. They also forget to include his name in their report, which makes finding and suing the good samaritan nearly impossible. :wink:

or

The criminals attorney sees no value in suing someone of no value. Hard pressed to find an attorney who will take a worthless case, he has to engage the services of the dregs of the local lawyers. Even the dumbest and most ill practiced of lawyers knows that it isn’t worth his time to sue someone who is worthless, and goes for the property owner of the place that the event occured. The afforementioned dumb and ill practiced attorney incompetently pursues the case and loses hands down to the insurrer of the property.

The criminal and attorney are both made fun of in local and possibly even national news stories.

The end.

[quote]apparently, it was Edmund Burke, who wrote:

“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.”

[/quote]

That’s odd, I always thought that was an MLK, Jr. quote. Did he say something similar.

[quote]Mick28 wrote:
Very good sounding words, I like them. You could also throw in some dramatic music as well, and also cue the sunset. But reality sometimes gets in the way of the drama.

The individual in question would have to pay for his own lawyer to defend the suit. Let’s see…a prolonged law suit could cost in the neighborhood of 10-k, or better. And if the guy wins the suit the hero could lose his house, car, bank account, etc.

Well, that’s only if the hero actually owns something right? What if he’s worth nothing, then he can play hero with no repercussion, right?

Wrong.

Then if our hero loses the suit his wages are garnished. That means that if our hero takes home $500.00 per week the “bad guy” gets a nice big cut of that. Sometimes up to half (or better) depending on the state.

Look, I’m not saying that you should stand by and allow the criminal element to take over in any given situation. But look really carefully before you leap, as that leap might just cost you everything that you have.
[/quote]

The definition of “right thing to do” probably varies according to where one lives.

In my “neck of the woods” heroism is still highly valued. If the facts in the case support the assumption that the Marine tackled the appropriate person during the commission of the felony the Marine would be celebrated in the press and applauded by the mayor. If the alleged felon then filed a personal injury lawsuit his legal representative would be shunned and publicly ridiculed for taking such a case. At least a dozen attorneys would then line up to defend the Marine pro bono and the townsfolk would start a fund to defray any of the Marine’s uncovered expenses.

The judge would probably respond to the case in this fashion.

Judge: So counselor, you are saying this young Marine tackled your client and broke his arm in three places causing undue suffering and potential loss of future earnings?

Attorney: That is correct your Honor.

Judge: Counselor, do you dispute that these injuries occurred while your client was fleeing the scene following his bank robbery attempt?

Attorney: The circumstances under which the injuries occurred are not relevant your Honor.

Judge: Counselor, perhaps your client would have preferred to be shot in the head by law enforcement officers? No counselor, your client should thank this heroic Marine for preventing the impending doom awaiting him outside those bank doors. Do not ever bring such garbage into my court again. Case dismissed.

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Okay Y’all are depressing the shit out of me.

But here is something depressing to

I know of people who committed armed robbery sold drugs plead guilty on all accounts. Get less than one year.

A person who robbed some one with a pen and paper, and got six years. Hmmmmmmm.

So if you do rob someone use a gun and not paper fraud. They are both felonies, but hey less time for attempting to hurt some one.

Hey, that McDonald’s coffee lawsuit got us warnings on the cups that hot coffee is hot.