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Making One Weight Last all Summer

Hello,
I am working on programming my summer training (will be training outdoors). I want to continue getting stronger while having to purchase as few weights as possible. Right now, I am pretty good at goblet squatting a 20 pound dumbbell for sets of five, but am very bad at all other loaded squats.

So, between adding reps (going from 3x5 to 5x12), adding isometric holds, and adding 1.5 reps, is it reasonable to think that one weight could last an entire three months worth of goblet squatting (squatting M,W,F)?

Also, how would you go about going from 3x5 to 5x12 anyway?

Thank you for your time and input.

careful about doing sets of 5 with 20lbs you will end up not being able to find jeans that fit.

If you are serious about getting stronger, join a gym…

let me get this straight, your plan is to use a 20 pound dumbbell for goblet squats for 3 months? Well I certainly wouldn’t do that, but if it floats your boat…

It kind of does float my boat. And I am serious about getting stronger. Strength is relative, and there are ways to get stronger without adding weight: adding sets and reps, or making each rep more challenging by reducing leverage or adding isometric holds etc. I am asking what the most optimal way to get stronger over a three month period without adding weight is.

Let’s say by the end of the spring, I’m squatting a 40 lb dumbbell for 3x5. How would you get that up to 5x12? Like when would you stop adding reps: 3x5, 3x6, 3x8…etc. and start adding sets? At what point would you resort to adding isometric holds? I’ve never tried anything like this before and I’m wondering if anyone else has any experience doing this kind of thing.

Thank you

a weight that light you will outgrow very fast in terms of strength.

I would look into complexes, that should keep things challenging

[quote]pootz wrote:
Strength is relative[/quote]
Yes and no. There are different “types” of strength such as absolute strength (probably the most common, like bringing your squat from 225 to 315), strength endurance (like squatting 315 for 10 minutes), relative strength (“strong for his bodyweight”), etc.

I’d argue that the methods you listed will allow progress, but won’t necessarily increase absolute strength. You’ll likely get better at the chosen exercises, and may see some muscle growth, but you won’t end up much closer to using a heavier dumbbell.

The most optimal way to get stronger is, by definition, going to require increasing the weight lifted. To be clear, what are your exact goals? “Getting stronger” isn’t a goal.

Also, what’s your current height, weight, and general fat level (pudgy, average, ripped, etc.)?

I thought you only had a 20 pound dumbbell? Exactly what equipment do you have?

Why is 5x12 stuck in your craw? You’ve mentioned it a few times, but that’s certainly not a magic set/rep pattern. The methods you’re talking about - using one weight and manipulating the sets, reps, exercises, and/or techniques - will improve performance/endurance and size (to an extent), but not maximum strength.

[quote]pootz wrote:
It kind of does float my boat. And I am serious about getting stronger. Strength is relative, and there are ways to get stronger without adding weight: adding sets and reps, or making each rep more challenging by reducing leverage or adding isometric holds etc. I am asking what the most optimal way to get stronger over a three month period without adding weight is.

Let’s say by the end of the spring, I’m squatting a 40 lb dumbbell for 3x5. How would you get that up to 5x12? Like when would you stop adding reps: 3x5, 3x6, 3x8…etc. and start adding sets? At what point would you resort to adding isometric holds? I’ve never tried anything like this before and I’m wondering if anyone else has any experience doing this kind of thing.

Thank you
[/quote]

It seems like you are thinking about it too much. There is no perfect time to stop adding reps or sets. Just push yourself and aim to beat your workout from the week before, whether is sets, reps, weight… I think your strength will go up rather quickly with 20lbs.

lol at strength is relative

grow a set and stop being a pussy you will get NOWHERE with this shit

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]pootz wrote:
Strength is relative[/quote]
Yes and no. There are different “types” of strength such as absolute strength (probably the most common, like bringing your squat from 225 to 315), strength endurance (like squatting 315 for 10 minutes), relative strength (“strong for his bodyweight”), etc.

I’d argue that the methods you listed will allow progress, but won’t necessarily increase absolute strength. You’ll likely get better at the chosen exercises, and may see some muscle growth, but you won’t end up much closer to using a heavier dumbbell.

The most optimal way to get stronger is, by definition, going to require increasing the weight lifted. To be clear, what are your exact goals? “Getting stronger” isn’t a goal.

Also, what’s your current height, weight, and general fat level (pudgy, average, ripped, etc.)?

I thought you only had a 20 pound dumbbell? Exactly what equipment do you have?

Why is 5x12 stuck in your craw? You’ve mentioned it a few times, but that’s certainly not a magic set/rep pattern. The methods you’re talking about - using one weight and manipulating the sets, reps, exercises, and/or techniques - will improve performance/endurance and size (to an extent), but not maximum strength.[/quote]

I definitely am over-thinking this. Thank you for your response, you seem like you would really be able to help me a lot, but I’m going to give this a rest and just keep squatting around with my dumbbell (as pussyfooted as that sounds to some here) and doing what feels good.

troll

[quote]marshaldteach wrote:
troll[/quote]

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