Main Hyper Layers and Fat Gain

@CT:

I’m getting into your Main Hyper Layers next week and wanted to know if you usually keep your “Off Days” at a lower carb level than the actual lifting days. I like to just drop Peri-workout cals and keep the carbs the same but wondering if a carb cycle approach would be better for less fat gain?

CT hates nutrition Q’s, so I’ll take a swing at it.

Follow whatever approach you have found to be successful already. The “natural carb cycling” of peri-workout seems to work well and its pretty much what I do.

Keep an eye on your recovery, the HDL in the hypertrophy layers are no joke. You will thank CT and bless his first born the week that you only have to do one of them.

@ Silver Ave:

Yes master guru…I know CT doesn’t like them. He sometimes comes in and answers the simple ones. Seriously on even the Fat Loss Layers I was having issues on recovering with such low carbys.

I pretty much eat the same everyday. The only thing that really varies is my peri… if I train once I have my peri, if I train twice per day I have 2 full peri, if I train 3 times, 2 full peri and 1 half peri, if I don’t train I obviously have no peri-workout shake.

So my caloric intake is basically determined by the amount of training I’m doing.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
I pretty much eat the same everyday. The only thing that really varies is my peri… if I train once I have my peri, if I train twice per day I have 2 full peri, if I train 3 times, 2 full peri and 1 half peri, if I don’t train I obviously have no peri-workout shake.

So my caloric intake is basically determined by the amount of training I’m doing.[/quote]

i think this is the best mentality for long term body composition…

treat your body like a machine. if its going to be working hard, give it more juice! no point filling up with fuel if you’re not planning on driving!

@ CT:

How do you deal with mid sleep waking and eating? Are you strict and do not do this? I notice I have a habit of whether on a gaining or leaning phase, I love waking up and eating half a Finibar or some oats in the middle of the night. Sometimes it is actual hunger from training and sometimes its my body craving the carbs for habitual insulin release to help sleep I’m sure.

@ Silver Ace:

How do you deal with the above situation… Does it hinder your leaning out with not fasting overnight or do you feel it makes no difference?

Also what’s your thoughts on carb cycling on totally off resting days… Do you feel lower moderate carbs 100g on these days hinders growth and the body should “feed” on these couple days rest per week?

[quote]brandon76 wrote:
@ CT:

How do you deal with mid sleep waking and eating? Are you strict and do not do this? I notice I have a habit of whether on a gaining or leaning phase, I love waking up and eating half a Finibar or some oats in the middle of the night. Sometimes it is actual hunger from training and sometimes its my body craving the carbs for habitual insulin release to help sleep I’m sure.[/quote]

I used to do it, but not anymore. I’d like to tell you that it was by strength of will but really it’s because of my dogs! My two dogs sleep in our bed with us. If I wake up and go to the kitchen they will follow me (they know where the food is, and that I cannot restrain from giving them some!) thus waking up my wife who is never in a great mood when it happens.

Because of that I stopped going to the kitchen to eat during the night.

I do not believe that nightly eating is conductive to getting lean, although drinking a shake when you wake up (especially a MAG-10 pulse) can help.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]brandon76 wrote:
@ CT:

How do you deal with mid sleep waking and eating? Are you strict and do not do this? I notice I have a habit of whether on a gaining or leaning phase, I love waking up and eating half a Finibar or some oats in the middle of the night. Sometimes it is actual hunger from training and sometimes its my body craving the carbs for habitual insulin release to help sleep I’m sure.[/quote]

I used to do it, but not anymore. I’d like to tell you that it was by strength of will but really it’s because of my dogs! My two dogs sleep in our bed with us. If I wake up and go to the kitchen they will follow me (they know where the food is, and that I cannot restrain from giving them some!) thus waking up my wife who is never in a great mood when it happens.

Because of that I stopped going to the kitchen to eat during the night.

I do not believe that nightly eating is conductive to getting lean, although drinking a shake when you wake up (especially a MAG-10 pulse) can help.[/quote]

Ha! I have the opposite problem when I am home… my wife is a very traditional Thai woman and if I go into the kitchen any time of day she will prepare and make me eat something!!! There is no way out of that kitchen without paying the toll… believe me I have tried, the food just follows you!

@ CT:

I’m not buying a dog. lol

@ Ricohceti: I have some Asian friends I know how that is.

@ CT:

In regards to “Off Days” do you think a lower carb approach vs similar to a full carb training day less full peri would influence muscle gain?

[quote]brandon76 wrote:
@ CT:

In regards to “Off Days” do you think a lower carb approach vs similar to a full carb training day less full peri would influence muscle gain? [/quote]

Yes it does. But to what extent, that is the question. And the answer is very individual. See, carbs do help gain muscle by increasing glycogen stores (which has 2 effects on muscle growth: (1) increased energy to train (2) increase in intramuscular pressure which activates protein synthesis), stimulating insulin release which is both anabolic (increase amino acids entry in the muscles) and anti-catabolic and by keeping IGF-1 levels higher.

So yes, a low carb day will be less anabolic than a day with at least some carbs. And even if you do not train, eating a very low amount of carbs (less than 100g) can decrease glycogen stores which will affect the next day’s workout.

Furthermore, the way I see it is that during your off days, your main goal is to recover and surcompensate from your other workouts. It’s true that you do not need as much fuel as on the days you train. But you still need ample nutrients to fully recover and even surcompensate and come back stronger after your off day.

@ CT:

Nice, this concludes my nutrition questions for the year. ha.

[quote]brandon76 wrote:
@ CT:

Nice, this concludes my nutrition questions for the year. ha. [/quote]

And it concludes my nutrition answers for the year :slight_smile:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
Furthermore, the way I see it is that during your off days, your main goal is to recover and surcompensate from your other workouts. It’s true that you do not need as much fuel as on the days you train. But you still need ample nutrients to fully recover and even surcompensate and come back stronger after your off day.[/quote]

This is exactly how I have always looked at it…

…and the bonus of looking at it this way is you get to eat more. : )

[quote]brandon76 wrote:
@ Silver Ace:

How do you deal with the above situation… Does it hinder your leaning out with not fasting overnight or do you feel it makes no difference?

Also what’s your thoughts on carb cycling on totally off resting days… Do you feel lower moderate carbs 100g on these days hinders growth and the body should “feed” on these couple days rest per week? [/quote]

The problem with nutrition is that its so highly individualized, but I will take a stab at it from my experience.

Night time eating: I dont make a point of it, and honestly I require much fewer calories than many other guys seem to so I have absolutely no problem getting in my food during the day.

I also value my sleep pretty highly as it isnt often I get a full 8 hours, so I actually cut off all fluid intake 4-6 hours before I go to bed so I purposefully DONT wake up in the middle of the night to pee.

Off Days/Carb Cycling: I follow an Anabolic Diet approach, which is a type of carb cycling if you think about it. I have found success with it, but it doesn’t sound like it would work for you. In that case, I would just do the “natural carb cycling” that the Peri provides, and work to find a “baseline” level of carbs that keeps you gaining but lean.

I also know Skip Lacour, one of the guys I read a ton from and have followed his approach with success as well, did not modulate his calories based on training/off days, but he DID use a “nutrient timing approach” … AKA he would have a carb/protein shake before and after the workout. So there is something to be said for just having a baseline diet, and then adding the Peri on top of it which I do believe helps and continue to do myself.

Lonnie, do you have a current log going? Looks like the last entry on your Indigo log was July.

[quote]Lonnie123 wrote:
I also value my sleep pretty highly as it isnt often I get a full 8 hours, so I actually cut off all fluid intake 4-6 hours before I go to bed so I purposefully DONT wake up in the middle of the night to pee.
[/quote]

I do the same thing…but I still wake up. My bladder sucks.

@ All:

Pleased to say added a Pulse when waking and sipping throughout the night and broke the habit of solid food munching. Its a good trade off or at least for a bit to regulate to full non-munching overnight.

@ timmcbrideandtheride:

The waking to pee issue is a whole other subject. I’ve tried everything to not do this. Unfortunately with our high protein intake, shakes, over a gallon or water per day, and training in the evening / late dinner, along with moderate caffeine intake…we are screwed.

The waking to pee issue is a whole other subject. I’ve tried everything to not do this. Unfortunately with our high protein intake, shakes, over a gallon or water per day, and training in the evening / late dinner, along with moderate caffeine intake…we are screwed.

I am with you guys on this.I lift late every night and along with peri drink,reg water intake and dinner I’m doomed.