T Nation

Lower Dose?


#1

Hi, I switched from weekly injections to injecting 50mg every three days and just got blood work done after about three weeks on this routine. My TT is about 800 and my E2 is at about 37. I feel a lot better now.

Still, my E2 is high but I do not want to use any drugs such as an AI so should I lower my dosage of test to 40 mg every three days instead? This should lower my E2 even more but will it bring my testosterone level too low?


#2

You are fine. Don't change anything.


#3

What would be wrong with lowering the dose to 40mg every three days?


#4

You are doing 116mg/week now and the suggested change us 93mg. You can try that and see how you feel. I don't expect that it will make a major difference in E2 effects. You really do need an AI and I think that if you tried that you would not want to give up the benefits.


#5

There's nothing wrong with lowering your dose except you'll be lowering your TT, which is in a good spot.

37 E2 is not bad at all, which is why I say do nothing.

You feel good, and your numbers are good to. Don't mess with it.


#6

The only way of knowing is trying. You can always go back to your current dose if it doesn't feel right. T = 800 is an arbitrary number anyway - it is not "better" or "worse" to have T = 800 than, say, T = 700. Both are in the upper part of the normal range for young men and it is unlikely that that extra 100 points would make any difference to how you feel, except perhaps indirectly via E2.

The important thing is how you feel, not numbers. If you feel great now, I wouldn't worry about the E2.

Having said that, I would say controlling E2 by reducing T dose (as far as this is possible while keeping T levels good) is obviously better than taking an extra drug to control E2. Some guys don't respond well to aromatase inhibitors despite good labs, for reasons that are not understood, and even for those who do, we don't know if they have long term side effects in men.


#7

Many feel terrible with E2=37 and feel reborn after then lowering their E2. Meth man give bad advice.

Almost all do very well using anastrozole, so don't be steered away from this effective and safe drug.

How you feel is greatly determined by your bio-available T and relative balance to E2. If that is good and you don't feel vital and have good libido, there is something else holding your brain back.

Why are you adverse to an AI drug? You can try the drug and see how you feel, then make a decision from that vantage point to go back to where you are now.


#8

You're the second person on these boards I've read say they want to avoid AI. Why?


#9

The fewer medications you have to take, the lesser the likelihood that complications will arise.


#10

It's your body, but I have to disagree on this one. If you're on TRT and are not taking an AI, I think you face a greater likelihood of complications. Your E2 is not terrible, so probably not a big deal, but I make medication decisions based on a cost-benefit analysis. I'm not seeing the cost to my body of taking a low dose of AI.


#11

The OP mentioned that he feels good.


#12

How so?

There are no long term safety studies of AIs in men, so it seems really premature to make that kind of statement. Anecdotal reports on the internet are notoriously unreliable, as you can easily see by choosing any quackery you know for a fact to be a quackery and googling all the glowing anecdotal reports on said quackery on the internet.


#13

Okay, I'm not sure there are long-term studies of TRT in men either, but I think it's really premature to toss it out and resign myself to living a low-T lifestyle. As far as estrogen, there is research supporting a 20s to low 30s sweet spot for avoiding increased risk of heart failure, and that's enough for me to want to keep it in check.
http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=183891


#14

Those men in that study were already very sick....