T Nation

Lower Body Antagonistic Training?

Hi,
I normally use antagonistic training for my upper body and would like to try to incorperate it into my lower body routine as well.

Problem is, I’m not sure what exercises to do aside from leg curl and extension. I may be doing leg exercises a little sloppy through I feel like all other leg movements get both the quads and hamstrings.

Should I forget about antagonistic lower body training or is there some other way?

[quote]P1 wrote:
Hi,
I normally use antagonistic training for my upper body and would like to try to incorperate it into my lower body routine as well.

Problem is, I’m not sure what exercises to do aside from leg curl and extension. I may be doing leg exercises a little sloppy through I feel like all other leg movements get both the quads and hamstrings.

Should I forget about antagonistic lower body training or is there some other way?[/quote]

I wouldn’t sya forget it, supersetting say squats and RDL’s would be the right idea but I imagine would be very taxing.

I just do a push pull routine at the moment, supersetting squats with say bench press, then military press with lunges and so on. Next day would be pullups with DL’s, and rows with GM. Whatever works for you, have fun experimenting in the gym a little bit.

A true antagonist to a squat etc would be an abdominal move drawing the trunk and hips IN as opposed to spreading them erect inn a squat

Phill

What he said. It’s very hard to get the leg muscles themselves to behave antagonistically. You could try splitting things up into hip- and quad- dominant exercises, but you’re probably better off going with an abdominal exercise.

There was an article a while back that listed various kinds of antagonism, and it even suggested using something like a pullup to offset your leg stuff, but I’d stick with the abs.

Try stiff-legged deadlifts for your hamstrings and back. Antagonize that with close-stance squats for your quads and decline crunches for your abs and other hip muscles. The problem here is that you work your glutes for two exercises (deadlifts and squats) and your abs are used in all exercises (mostly as stabilizers). Your back also bears some weight during squatting.

Here’s an easy one: Calf Raises and Reverse Calf Raises.