Lower Back Pain

I have suffered from a tight/painful lower back for about a year now. The pain occurs during sitting mainly, and I really feel my lower back in lifts like squats and deadlifts. I get particularly bad DOMS in my lower back.

I’ve tried stretching my lower back, but that didn’t help long term. Recently, I tried stretching my hips daily, which helped a bit. I’ve tried foam rolling daily. Didn’t help my lower back.

I have to sit down a lot at medical school. Moving about more seems to help, but this is not always possible with my schedule.

If you can give me some helpful advice or suggest what the problem may be, then please respond. I’d really appreciate any help I can get.

I have the exact same symptoms and lower back pain and my chiropractor told me that I have a misaligned sacrum. Every time I visit him he shifts it back into place in literally 2 seconds and I’m outta there, but then immediately after my next deadlift workout I feel the same old pain.

Try dynamically stretching the hips and groin to improve flexibility, I’ve been told that directly stretching the lower back/hip flexors can make the problem worse. I do foam roll, but the dynamic stretching really does help. Also, I recently started doing several exercises to help my sacrum that also help a lot. Check out this video I was recommended to on youtube The Dorn Method Sacrum Self Help Exercises sample Video - YouTube, its called the Dorn Method.

I’m not a trainer or anything like that but this is my 2 cents, hope this helps!

that video i posted just shows a black white screen to me so heres the actual html if you cant see it …youtube.com/watch?v=X0PlryxEDnY

It helped me, personally, to read all (or most) of the articles here:

http://robertsontrainingsystems.com/articles/

It could be any number of things. Lower back pain occurs in like 80% of the US population or something crazy like that.

If it is NOT an injury, which it very well may not be (herniated disc for example), it could be tight shoulders/thoracic spine, or imbalance in hip or trunk strength.

I got a knowledgeable trainer to assess me and help develop a program for my LBP and shoulder problems, which would be my first reccomendation if it is not an injury. If you don’t wanna go that route I would look at your training and go back to the basics for a month or so and work on your weaknesses, whatever they may be. Everyone is different.

i had a bad playground back injury in 2nd grade and as a result i dont think my back has ever been up to snuff and ive also never been able to stretch at all.

are you sure your form is good on squats and deadlifts? i have a tendency to round my lower back slightly on both, but ive found using a belt for both helps me keep them straight. also, where my back used to get tired or sore it doesnt seem to with a belt. thats just my experience, ive never been officially diagnosed or anything.

Thanks for the responses, guys.

There was a method described on here about a year ago that really helped me, and still does. Take two tennis balls and tape them together with a bunch of athletic tape. Then get into a sit-up position with the tennis balls lying length-wise underneath the small of your back. With your arms at your side, perform a crunch for five or six reps, then move the balls up about an inch or so (about half a ball width) and do five or six more crunches and keep doing this until you get about 1/3 of the way up your back, then go back to the small of your back and do it again. It might feel a little rough on your back at first, like a deep-tissue massage, but it gets better once you’ve done this for a few days. I used to get sciatica every once in a while after deadlifting but doing this combined with some foam-rolling and a few hip flexor stretches, some knee and ankle mobility drills and some hamstring stretches really seems to help me out. I spend about five or ten minutes before every lower body workout doing this stuff.

Tight hamstrings can cause low back pain.

[quote]DBCooper wrote:
There was a method described on here about a year ago that really helped me, and still does. Take two tennis balls and tape them together with a bunch of athletic tape. Then get into a sit-up position with the tennis balls lying length-wise underneath the small of your back. With your arms at your side, perform a crunch for five or six reps, then move the balls up about an inch or so (about half a ball width) and do five or six more crunches and keep doing this until you get about 1/3 of the way up your back, then go back to the small of your back and do it again. It might feel a little rough on your back at first, like a deep-tissue massage, but it gets better once you’ve done this for a few days. I used to get sciatica every once in a while after deadlifting but doing this combined with some foam-rolling and a few hip flexor stretches, some knee and ankle mobility drills and some hamstring stretches really seems to help me out. I spend about five or ten minutes before every lower body workout doing this stuff.[/quote]

I think Mike Boyle said something about that tennis ball thing. Thanks for the tips.

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:
Tight hamstrings can cause low back pain. [/quote]

You could be right there. My hamstrings are very tight - it’s very painful to stretch them. But I’ve read that hamstring stretching can be bad…

Just browsed the thread, I herniated two discs in my back so I have similar pain. Stretching your back and your hips will help, but the most important thing to keep loose is your legs. Your hamstrings, quads and glutes need to be stretched at least twice per day. Whoever told you that it was bad to stretch 'em should be backhanded.

It shouldn’t be painful at all to stretch your hammys, quads, and glutes, and if it is, than there is the answer that your having such bad back problems.

They have a huge impact on your back and the muscles surrounding it, so make sure to stretch your legs as much as possible.

[quote]htargett wrote:
I have suffered from a tight/painful lower back for about a year now. The pain occurs during sitting mainly, and I really feel my lower back in lifts like squats and deadlifts. I get particularly bad DOMS in my lower back.

I’ve tried stretching my lower back, but that didn’t help long term. Recently, I tried stretching my hips daily, which helped a bit. I’ve tried foam rolling daily. Didn’t help my lower back.

I have to sit down a lot at medical school. Moving about more seems to help, but this is not always possible with my schedule.

If you can give me some helpful advice or suggest what the problem may be, then please respond. I’d really appreciate any help I can get.[/quote]

spinal manipulation therapy is great for LBP. find an osteopath or chiropractor and have them manipulate it.

Check out Tony Gentilcore’s Deconstructing Computer Guy,on this web site

Thanks for the replies :slight_smile:

[quote]WestCoast7 wrote:
Just browsed the thread, I herniated two discs in my back so I have similar pain. Stretching your back and your hips will help, but the most important thing to keep loose is your legs. Your hamstrings, quads and glutes need to be stretched at least twice per day. Whoever told you that it was bad to stretch 'em should be backhanded.

It shouldn’t be painful at all to stretch your hammys, quads, and glutes, and if it is, than there is the answer that your having such bad back problems.

They have a huge impact on your back and the muscles surrounding it, so make sure to stretch your legs as much as possible.[/quote]

Thanks for the suggestion. How do you stretch your hamstrings, quads and glutes? My hamstrings are really tight.

how soft is your mattress?? in college i had an apt that came with a king sized bed, so i decided to take that instead of bringing my own. problem was the thing was old and really worn out. i had constant lower back pain. One day i went to home depot, got some cheap 1/4 inch boards, and it solved all my problems. i think ive put boards under every mattress ive had since and it seems to really help me too.

Check my “clunking back” thread in t-cell Alpha

[quote]BradTGIF wrote:
Check my “clunking back” thread in t-cell Alpha[/quote]

Thanks for the suggestion.

[quote]clockworkchad wrote:
how soft is your mattress?? in college i had an apt that came with a king sized bed, so i decided to take that instead of bringing my own. problem was the thing was old and really worn out. i had constant lower back pain. One day i went to home depot, got some cheap 1/4 inch boards, and it solved all my problems. i think ive put boards under every mattress ive had since and it seems to really help me too.[/quote]

Not sure my mattress is causing the problem… Are you saying yours was too soft?

I suffered from back pain that sounds exactly like yours for years. Every time I would squat and dead lift heavy my back pain would flair up. It never would really go away completely, but heavy squats and deads definitely made it worse. I had always heard that reverse hyperextensions were great for low back pain, but I have never had access to a reverse hyper machine. I was recently introduced to the exercise ball version. This video shows to exercise, I just use a little more range of motion (let your legs come all the way down at the bottom)and I use a little faster tempo. - YouTube

I began doing these 2x per week for 3x10-15. After about a month of doing these every week my back pain was almost completely gone and has stayed away for about two months now. This is all while doing the heaviest squatting and dead lifting I have done in years. Give it a try and see if it works for you.