T Nation

Lower Back Pain

i hav bin training for 3 years am 16 now nd 4 de las 6 months I get bad lower back pain for de days following when I train certain tings such as squats,bent rows, deadlifts no pain wile im training them doe…? i dont wanna stop doin dem completely bt ne way i can help de pain? ne thoughts or ideas wud be appreciated? :slight_smile:

not to break balls here, but…
use the incredibly useful search function, located in the top right-hand corner of the page.
also, please use all real words when you post, you will get more responses.

Learn how to push out your abs out against a weight belt when doing any exercise that requires alot of lower back involvement. Check out Dave Tate’s articles on squating. Basically if you take a big breath and push the air into your belly instead of you lungs, then mantain that pressure through out the exercise, and you’ll soon find that you’ll be free from lower back pain. Every good powerlifter masters this tech. and this is why we can handle huge weights without major back injury.

George

[quote]miroku333 wrote:
not to break balls here, but…
use the incredibly useful search function, located in the top right-hand corner of the page.
also, please use all real words when you post, you will get more responses.[/quote]

sorry about not usen full words its the first time i made a post i will use full words from now on :slight_smile:

[quote]powerhouse reno wrote:
Learn how to push out your abs out against a weight belt when doing any exercise that requires alot of lower back involvement. Check out Dave Tate’s articles on squating. Basically if you take a big breath and push the air into your belly instead of you lungs, then mantain that pressure through out the exercise, and you’ll soon find that you’ll be free from lower back pain. Every good powerlifter masters this tech. and this is why we can handle huge weights without major back injury.

George [/quote]

unfortunatly when i first went to a gym the trainer there told me to suck my abs in while squating, but i will try pushing my abs out like that tomorrow while squating
thanks

[quote]powerhouse reno wrote:
Learn how to push out your abs out against a weight belt when doing any exercise that requires alot of lower back involvement. Check out Dave Tate’s articles on squating. Basically if you take a big breath and push the air into your belly instead of you lungs, then mantain that pressure through out the exercise, and you’ll soon find that you’ll be free from lower back pain. Every good powerlifter masters this tech. and this is why we can handle huge weights without major back injury.

George [/quote]

+1
Kerley, welcome to T-Nation by the way!

[quote]miroku333 wrote:

+1
Kerley, welcome to T-Nation by the way![/quote]

thanks man

Seriously mate, get chcked out. I’ve had bulging discs since your age and if you want to keep lifting long term you need to get your back checked.

After that you need to get your form right with the priority on keeping a natural arch in your back. For deads and squats this may mean increasing flexibility in your hammies and hips.

Make sure that the arch is there is bent over rows, it’s easy to use too much weight and lose form. They might not even be a great exercise choice for you, I’ve not done them for years. If you’re spending a lot of time at school learn how to sit up properly too.

Often your lower back won’t feel anything during the exerise because the heat masks the pain.

I know it’s hard to take it seriously when your 16 but once your back goes it sets of a chain reaction of all sorts of shit and you’ll spend the rest of your life trying to fix it.

Andy has good points, but learning how to use your abs to squat and dead is super important. I have been at this for over 3 decades and using the abs properly is the best way to avoid back problems.

Again, check out Westside barbells site and search the article section for deads and squats, also check out Dave Tate’s articles on squating on this site.

George

Some people just seem to be able to squat and dead problem free. However I think once you have hurt your back it’s symptomatic of something else. There’s a fair bit of work to be done to be able to squat and dead properly.

If someone has been doing it for 30 years there’s a fair chance there doing something right.

Just don’t ignore it and carry on anyway. A couple of weeks without squatting won’t kill you. Otherwise you might be saying hello to single leg work only for a long time.

Find Hanley and lift with him.

[quote]AndyG wrote:
Seriously mate, get chcked out. I’ve had bulging discs since your age and if you want to keep lifting long term you need to get your back checked.

After that you need to get your form right with the priority on keeping a natural arch in your back. For deads and squats this may mean increasing flexibility in your hammies and hips.

Make sure that the arch is there is bent over rows, it’s easy to use too much weight and lose form. They might not even be a great exercise choice for you, I’ve not done them for years. If you’re spending a lot of time at school learn how to sit up properly too.

Often your lower back won’t feel anything during the exerise because the heat masks the pain.

I know it’s hard to take it seriously when your 16 but once your back goes it sets of a chain reaction of all sorts of shit and you’ll spend the rest of your life trying to fix it.[/quote]

yeah man tanks i’am going to see a physiotheripist soon about it. I’ve read that doing more hamstring work may help lower back pain is that true?

If your hamstrings are strong your lower back won’t take the bulk of the load and round when lifting. Just try to make sure you work on flexibilty just as hard as bringing up their strength could also shorten them.

Ab work is so important for heavy lifting. Not talking about hours of crunches and various other ab cycles. Try strengthening your lower abs with something like leg raises at the end of your workout.

Also, make sure to stretch your periformis muscles(located in your buttocks) once they become tight they pull on your lower back and tailbone area. This is also in part to weak hamstring muscles. Make sure to strengthen the hams and stretch along with ab work.

[quote]Kal-El wrote:
Ab work is so important for heavy lifting. Not talking about hours of crunches and various other ab cycles. Try strengthening your lower abs with something like leg raises at the end of your workout.

Also, make sure to stretch your periformis muscles(located in your buttocks) once they become tight they pull on your lower back and tailbone area. This is also in part to weak hamstring muscles. Make sure to strengthen the hams and stretch along with ab work.[/quote]

yeah i do a good bit of ab work twice a week at the end of my squat day, i do mostly standing ab work and some weighted crunches.

as some one with preexisting lower back pain, id recommend increasing your warm up time. Make sure your hamstrings are loose, hip flexors are well stretched, and your core is STRONG. a weight belt is not meant to replace your core muscles, its meant to complement and enhance them… they all must work together. good luck with your pain kerley…

DO NOT POP PAIN KILLERS BEFORE LIFTING OR MUSCLE RELAXERS BTW* i dunno if that thought popped into your mind but i saw it in another post its the worst idea i ever went through with…