T Nation

Lower Back Exercises

Besides SLDL which I am bored doing, what other weighted lower back exercises can a person with limited equipment and money do? I train at home. I have BB, DB, BB/DB plates, adjustable bench, squat rack, slant board.

Current weekly routine after time off.
S/T/T
Below Parallel Squat 3x5x170lbs.
1 or 2 months ago 2x3x220lbs, 1x1x230lbs
Flat Bench Press 3x5x not worth mentioning at this time.
DL 2x5x220lbs, 1x1x240lbs on last set
M/W
Weighted Decline sit-ups on slant board 2x20x50lbs
Side Bends 2x15x60lbs each side

Oh the possibilities! You can do all the different deadlift and good morning variations (varying your stance-width, grip-width and depth of the lift). I like snatch grip romanian deadlifts and close stance arched back good mornings.

If you have a partner, you can have him hold onto your feet while you suspend your torso off a sturdy table and do back extensions. Similarly, you can do reverse hypers the same way except your legs will be suspended and torso fixed to the table. You can drape your body over a swiss ball with your knees on the ground and do rounded back extensions.

for hyperextensions, I remember something important about the form but not sure what it was. Were you not suppose to go up to a certain level / are you suppose to keep your back straight the whole time?

I will try good mornings. The reason I never did GM before is because I always thought they worked the hams more than the lower back.
Thanks dude.

I actually find that good mornings hit my low back more than SLDL’s because the weight is further out on the lever arm. If you do hypers keep your glutes contracted on the way up, it will help stabilize your pelvis.

How about doing some regular deadlifts, tough to beat them for back strength.

[quote]Modi wrote:
How about doing some regular deadlifts, tough to beat them for back strength.[/quote]

Regular DL’s work the upperback and middleback more than the lowerback.

[quote]Slim Jim wrote:
Modi wrote:
How about doing some regular deadlifts, tough to beat them for back strength.

Regular DL’s work the upperback and middleback more than the lowerback.
[/quote]

I’m pretty sure a heavy ass deadlift is going to give your lower back a beating.

I second that a heavy ass deadlift in decent volume would blow it up.

I think the hyperextension raising level just at level with the rest of the body, nothing more…so not really hyper extension.

i could be wrong

I like good mornings and partial deadlifts for lower back.

[quote]Slim Jim wrote:
Modi wrote:
How about doing some regular deadlifts, tough to beat them for back strength.

Regular DL’s work the upperback and middleback more than the lowerback.
[/quote]

I’m not sure I agree with that. With a heavy enough load, you are definately going to hit the low back pretty hard. It’s a great exercise for the whole posterior chain.

[quote]Slim Jim wrote:
Modi wrote:
How about doing some regular deadlifts, tough to beat them for back strength.

Regular DL’s work the upperback and middleback more than the lowerback.
[/quote]

Someone please correct me if I’m wrong, but I think the lumbar erectors have their origin on the sacrum and iliac crest, and insert on the posterior inferior ribs. Therefore, the lower spinal erectors cannot by themselves produce hip extension. They aid in many hip extension exercises by contracting isometrically, thus allowing for the mantainence an arched posture (preventing rounding of lower back) and thereby allowing for optimal leverage during many hip extension exercises such as squats, deadlifts, good mornings and back extensions (and even t-bar and bent over rows).

The only “true” lumbar erector exercise would be an isolation exercise which allowed only lumbar extension (and not hip extension), such as a rounded back extension off a swiss ball or glute ham raise apparatus, whereby the lumbar erectors are contracting concentrically and eccentrically.

However, it is difficult to provide an optimal load during these isolation exercises, and is more beneficial to perform exercises that allow for maximal loads such as deadlift and good morning variations, even though such exercises only produce isometric contractions of the lumbar erectors.

[quote]bretc wrote:
Slim Jim wrote:
Modi wrote:
How about doing some regular deadlifts, tough to beat them for back strength.

Regular DL’s work the upperback and middleback more than the lowerback.

Someone please correct me if I’m wrong, but I think the lumbar erectors have their origin on the sacrum and iliac crest, and insert on the posterior inferior ribs. Therefore, the lower spinal erectors cannot by themselves produce hip extension. They aid in many hip extension exercises by contracting isometrically, thus allowing for the mantainence an arched posture (preventing rounding of lower back) and thereby allowing for optimal leverage during many hip extension exercises such as squats, deadlifts, good mornings and back extensions (and even t-bar and bent over rows).

The only “true” lumbar erector exercise would be an isolation exercise which allowed only lumbar extension (and not hip extension), such as a rounded back extension off a swiss ball or glute ham raise apparatus, whereby the lumbar erectors are contracting concentrically and eccentrically.

However, it is difficult to provide an optimal load during these isolation exercises, and is more beneficial to perform exercises that allow for maximal loads such as deadlift and good morning variations, even though such exercises only produce isometric contractions of the lumbar erectors. [/quote]

I’m not sure what your point is.

[quote]Modi wrote:
bretc wrote:
Slim Jim wrote:
Modi wrote:
How about doing some regular deadlifts, tough to beat them for back strength.

Regular DL’s work the upperback and middleback more than the lowerback.

Someone please correct me if I’m wrong, but I think the lumbar erectors have their origin on the sacrum and iliac crest, and insert on the posterior inferior ribs. Therefore, the lower spinal erectors cannot by themselves produce hip extension. They aid in many hip extension exercises by contracting isometrically, thus allowing for the mantainence an arched posture (preventing rounding of lower back) and thereby allowing for optimal leverage during many hip extension exercises such as squats, deadlifts, good mornings and back extensions (and even t-bar and bent over rows).

The only “true” lumbar erector exercise would be an isolation exercise which allowed only lumbar extension (and not hip extension), such as a rounded back extension off a swiss ball or glute ham raise apparatus, whereby the lumbar erectors are contracting concentrically and eccentrically.

However, it is difficult to provide an optimal load during these isolation exercises, and is more beneficial to perform exercises that allow for maximal loads such as deadlift and good morning variations, even though such exercises only produce isometric contractions of the lumbar erectors.

I’m not sure what your point is.[/quote]

His point is to show us how much smarter he is then the rest of us.

Barney,
Thanks for clearing that up for me.

Check out the article I wrote a while back titled “Erector Set,” it should help you out.

Stay strong
MR

www.RobertsonTrainingSystems.com