T Nation

Low Dose Insulin for a Faster Recovery Post Workout - Is it realistic?


#1

As the title says, I have always wanted to incorporate a low dose of insulin for my post workout meals. Here is what I have in mind. I was thinking about using 2-3IU's at a 1:17 ratio which makes it a total of 50g of carbs per postworkout meal + 100g protein (whey and some hard boiled eggs/chicken). I intend to jab a few minutes prior to having my post workout meal in the afternoon.

Humalog will be the insulin of choice, therefore I expect it to peak in the ~2 hour mark. A second protein shake will be taken at this point.Metformin will be taken on the second half of the day along with the pre-sleep meal to restore insulin sensitivity.

I have to clarify I do not want to use insulin to get bigger. I want to utilize it purely for a faster recovery!

At a first look utilizing this method should (based on what I have read):

-Avoid going into a hypoglycemic state.
-Avoid any excess fat stored (given that a very low amount of fats are consumed and carbs are limited to the same fixed amount every time).
-Potentially faster recovery (therefore having the opportunity to train the same body part as soon as the 48 hour mark).

But then again this is guesswork from what I have read and I would like people to contribute comments based on their experience. Is it a bad idea? Ineffective? Potentially good idea? Go hard or go home? I am all ears guys.


#2

i think this has since been de-bunked…

you should have a significant post workout spike anyway, and additional insulin might not really contribute that much. i think there was an article on this site a while back, that attributed most of the gains to the extra carbs that the users ate out of fear of going too low…

as far as Metformin, i would not use that unless you were on cycle as it can lower thyroid levels and testosterone levels…

you might want to look into IGF-1 and PEG, as i believe they can increase recovery substantially without making you gain fat.


#3

Thank you for your reply. In fact I have been searching about how much endogenous insulin is released with a meal (to compare it with exogenous insulin). I guess if you are not using too much you might as well not use any at all.

However, I remember reading that non-diabetics who use insulin have endogenous insulin released in addition to any exogenous insulin used. That would be mean that you would get a substantially bigger spike due to the abnormal amount of insulin at your system.

I would love to try IGF-1/PEG but they are far more costly than my budget allows me to and I doubt they have a good value for money compared to aas.


#4

i dunno, i think IGF/PEG aren’t all that pricey. but you’re right, regular AAS is pretty darn cost effective, in comparison…

i think Mr Walkaway had a thread on insulin in the forum somewhere.

typically, i’m a little knee-jerk to that, as my wife is diabetic (type-1). i will say, she typically uses 1 IU humalog for 25 grams of carbs. if you can, i’d get a glucose meter so you can actually see how you respond to insulin…