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Low Carb - The Yogurt Exception?

Has anyone heard about the “Yogurt Exception” in Low Carb diets?

The theory goes like this: If the Yogurt contains “Live Cultures” then those cultures (i.e. bacteria) will continue to convert some of the sugars in the Yogurt into lactic acid. So a typical cup of yogurt will have something like 4 grams of carbs, instead of the listed 12-13 grams.

The reason why so many carbs are listed in the label is because the Federal government requires you to measure “by difference”. So, you measure all of the Proteins and Fats and then subtract the them from the total, giving you the Carb count.

So, does anyone here count only 4 grams per cup of Yogurt?

Here are some references:
http://www.lowcarbluxury.com/yogurt.html

http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/showthread.php?t=420230

http://forum.lowcarber.org/archive/index.php/t-111608.html

http://www.lowcarbtransformation.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1357

Ian Lewis

depends.

Grab the cultures from certain cheeses and HCl for digestion. For really low carb periods I nix the yogurt. But for hard training periods I use the sugary no fat shit as PWO food. Shit I actually eat it during the workout sometimes. So I suppose I don’t use yogurt when truly low carbing it.

This could be because I nix shakes as well when low carbing and that’s the only place where I eat yogurt that isnt the sugary shit.

-chris

[quote]dougrisk wrote:
Has anyone heard about the “Yogurt Exception” in Low Carb diets?

The theory goes like this: If the Yogurt contains “Live Cultures” then those cultures (i.e. bacteria) will continue to convert some of the sugars in the Yogurt into lactic acid. So a typical cup of yogurt will have something like 4 grams of carbs, instead of the listed 12-13 grams.

The reason why so many carbs are listed in the label is because the Federal government requires you to measure “by difference”. So, you measure all of the Proteins and Fats and then subtract the them from the total, giving you the Carb count.

So, does anyone here count only 4 grams per cup of Yogurt?

Here are some references:
www.lowcarbluxury.com/yogurt.html

www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/showthread.php?t=420230

forum.lowcarber.org/archive/index.php/t-111608.html

www.lowcarbtransformation.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1357

Ian Lewis[/quote]

Interesting.

Honestly Im not sure. I don’t count fiber like alot of people don’t nowadays. Basically, I treat all fiberous veggies like brocolli, lettuce, spinich, etc. as if they were no carb containing meats, which means I can have all I want.

I’d be curious to see more feedback.

[quote]dougrisk wrote:
Has anyone heard about the “Yogurt Exception” in Low Carb diets?

The theory goes like this: If the Yogurt contains “Live Cultures” then those cultures (i.e. bacteria) will continue to convert some of the sugars in the Yogurt into lactic acid. So a typical cup of yogurt will have something like 4 grams of carbs, instead of the listed 12-13 grams.

The reason why so many carbs are listed in the label is because the Federal government requires you to measure “by difference”. So, you measure all of the Proteins and Fats and then subtract the them from the total, giving you the Carb count.

So, does anyone here count only 4 grams per cup of Yogurt?

Here are some references:
www.lowcarbluxury.com/yogurt.html

www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/showthread.php?t=420230

forum.lowcarber.org/archive/index.php/t-111608.html

www.lowcarbtransformation.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1357

Ian Lewis[/quote]

You may be on to something. Inspite of the card/sugar content, Yougurt has a low GI index rating. Which always surprised me. I know GI can be altered by the addition of fat/fiber/protein, but it is still pretty low.

Yeah, I am about to start the NHE plan from Rob Faigin (which is similar to the Anabolic Diet) and I am thinking of counting each cup as 4 grams. Granted, this is Plain Whole Yogurt.

RealPeanutButter: You use the Low-Fat stuff Post-Workout? That surprises me. I thought that you were a big fan of the Anabolic Diet and therefore you would be getting Protein and Fat for PWO.

ocn2000: You check the GI of different foods. Lately I have gotten more interested in the Insulin Index of foods rather than the Glycemic Index. That is, it matters less about the “sugary” content of the food than the body’s reaction to it.

T-Nick: I sorta do the same thing with fibrous foods. I eat a ton of it and then do a quick check to see how many non-fibrous carbs were in it.

[quote]dougrisk wrote:
Yeah, I am about to start the NHE plan from Rob Faigin (which is similar to the Anabolic Diet) and I am thinking of counting each cup as 4 grams. Granted, this is Plain Whole Yogurt.

RealPeanutButter: You use the Low-Fat stuff Post-Workout? That surprises me. I thought that you were a big fan of the Anabolic Diet and therefore you would be getting Protein and Fat for PWO.

ocn2000: You check the GI of different foods. Lately I have gotten more interested in the Insulin Index of foods rather than the Glycemic Index. That is, it matters less about the “sugary” content of the food than the body’s reaction to it.

T-Nick: I sorta do the same thing with fibrous foods. I eat a ton of it and then do a quick check to see how many non-fibrous carbs were in it.[/quote]

Oh yeah I’m AD for most of the year but in times of hard training where I need smaller cycles I use the yogurt to CHO up. Kinda like Berardi’s pn. Exactly like it infact. One mini load per insane training session. Other wise activity like thai bxing and wrestling become highly catabolic and tiring. Plus since im working so much I can eat that carby shit without any adverse effect.

It’s all timing for me. every other day though, it’s eggs.

-chris

Just a follow-up on how many carbs per serving of fermented, active-culture dairy products:

2 grams per 1/2 cup of Yogurt, Kefir or Buttermilk.

Which means 4 grams of carbs per cup.

Buttermilk is F’ing delicious.

If you do a Google search on Goldberg (the guy that wrote about it) and Yogurt, Kefir and Buttermilk, you will find tons of hits (and testimonies):

http://www.google.com/search?q=Yogurt+OR+Yoghurt+Goldberg+Kefir+Buttermilk&num=100&hl=en&lr=&safe=off&client=opera&rls=en&hs=FM1&filter=0

[quote]dougrisk wrote:

T-Nick: I sorta do the same thing with fibrous foods. I eat a ton of it and then do a quick check to see how many non-fibrous carbs were in it.[/quote]

Yep. Pretty much any green vegetable I treat as being carb free. I don’t even bother counting whatever miniscule carbs they have. I honestly don’t believe its possible to get fat, or hell, gain any weight from eating to many fiberous veggies.

Plus, the cancer fighting antioxidants, and the new research that indicates alot of fiberous green veggies, especially brocolli, having anti estrogenic properties.