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Low Back X-Ray Question

I got my low back x-rayed today, and I was told that my right hip is higher than my left hip. I was also told that my left leg is lower than my right leg. Anyone know how to fix this problem?

Thanks

You are in luck. You most likely do not have an anatomically short leg. Find someone who does bodywork and they should be able to help. Most often the Ql on the side that is high is hyper-tonic and it needs to be lengthened. They might also suggest side bending stretches and exercises depending on your situation.

Someone who does bodywork as in a chiropractor?

[quote]Johnyjohnjohn wrote:
Someone who does bodywork as in a chiropractor?[/quote]

probably a physical therapist. I have had my hips adjusted before and it made a difference. the threapist will probably also have you lay on wedges placed on your hips to proep you for adjustment. I’m leary of chiropractors.
Joe

make sure you get a pt that is an athlete. some of them are bozos that don’t understand an athletes needs. if you lived in abq I could reccomend some to you.

A PT or even massage therapist. If you have no injuries and just need the hips balanced a MT who does posture type work should do the trick just fine. If you find a PT, like the other guy said, get someone who spends one on one time and does direct soft tissue manipulation. Although they have the most complete training and approach to musculoskeletal pain, many PT’s are just simply overbooked and don’t do direct st manipulation.

Or find a Chiro that is also into sports medicine and not just a back cracker

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He did it standing up, and I had the x-ray taken because one of my spotters noticed the hip problem when I was squatting.

I would suggest being very careful when you squat. Chances are it sounds like you have a LLD leg length Discrepancy. If it is minimal you may not have a ton of problems over the course of your life. I would guess if you looked at your back x-ray you would see some degeneration in your L5-SI joint possibly even higher. Your pelvis tilt or hips is adjusting for this discrepancy. One thing to find out is if it is in your femur or tibia/ fibula. From a squat perspective if the discrepancy is small enough and it is in the lower portion of your extremity then a small shoe lift would fix the problems with the hips and back.

If it is in the femur short of cutting a few millimeters out of you femur you are probably not going to want to be a squatting machine. Trust me it will wear out your lower back from the shift or hitch on the bottom of your squat. Good luck and remember there are other ways to get your legs strong. Most single leg exercises won’t put the stress on your back.

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Well also at the time I was having some pain in my mid back (gone now). They x-rayed my mid back first, then they x-rayed my low back. I thought it would be a good idea to get things checked out. I didn’t know there was such an issue with radiation. In the X-ray, they also found my spine rotates to the left as it approaches my pelvis. That is a good idea with the plywood.

X-ray is ionizing but the dosage is much less than BBB thinks…its about 20 times less than a dental xray and much less than a transcontinental flight. Whoever took the film may have been out of line for the reasons given (ie a spotter told me to) but it doesn’t change the fact that the information obtained is valid.

Whichever practitioner you see, should have experience in reading an x-ray…PT’s or massage therapists have little to none, and if they have ever been taught to look at it, they can massage it all they want, or zap you with eletricity but it won’t change the fact if you have a transitional segment at L5 or S1 or there is some other reason for the hip height discrepancy. How they took the film is important. If you had any rotation about a Y axis in your hips then you can get a false positive finding for a hip height discrepancy due to parallax error.
DrC
Oh and BBB will want references…so here you go :wink:

good answer
Dr.Tim

drc, the problem with that pdf is that it does not list lumbar spine radiograph doses.
L-spine films are one of the higher dosage plain films studies done.
http://www.drvxray.com/xray_exposure.htm
that’s a simple reference but l-spine films are 40 times more exposure than chest films.

its still a small dose and nowhere near a CT.
and its indeed true that a Radiologist has to read the films for the “official” interpretation. In fact most insurance wont pay for a film to be taken unless a Radiologist reads it. Be aware of “quack” type PTs and chiropractors with their own xray equipment. They arent trained how to read these and make their patients pay for this “service”.

These medical discussions get pretty funny sometimes. I was taught in school that you don’t detonate an atomic bomb to kill an ant. A leg length discrepancy, with a hip imbalance is going to create a rotation on the Y axis to the same side (LL). So the imbalance itself could be causing the transitional segment/s. The SI joint articulates together in a diagonal position, almost like two wedges, so any A/P movement will by necessity cause rotation. While sitting in your chair, notice your knees and spine while elevating each side of the pelvis, one knee will “extend” further away and the spine rotates. The point is that this entire pattern is caused by the contraction of one muscle.

Just imagine the massive amount of force it takes the nervous and muscular system to activate the skeletal system and deadlift 600 hundred pounds. It isn�??t a hard stretch to realize that the first two systems can create a subconscious holding pattern on the third, which in most cases is programmed by simple everyday activities.

I am not trying to diagnose you are tell you exactly what you need to do, or which practitioner you do or do not need to go to. The best approach in any situation is to build a team of practitioners that can work together, even if only at the moment it is a minor problem. That just means it should be that much less expensive and easier to fix. If you can take some fundamental advice from any of these posts it is to work with a qualified practitioner. No one on the internet can tell you what exactly is going on or how to compensate and or fix the problem.

By the way just to chime in on the x-ray thing, I have to point out that Chiros are not experts at x-ray reading either. In fact I know a number of doctors who believe the widespread use of taking films, as it does here in the states, is irresponsible and should be left up to the radiologists. However, just because this is the case, it does not mean that a chiro, MT or PT, are any less instrumental in addressing the issue by actually examining and thoroughly assessing the patient manually, and or working with other another physician�??s diagnosis.

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[quote]urbanski wrote:
drc, the problem with that pdf is that it does not list lumbar spine radiograph doses.
L-spine films are one of the higher dosage plain films studies done.
http://www.drvxray.com/xray_exposure.htm
that’s a simple reference but l-spine films are 40 times more exposure than chest films.

its still a small dose and nowhere near a CT.
and its indeed true that a Radiologist has to read the films for the “official” interpretation. In fact most insurance wont pay for a film to be taken unless a Radiologist reads it. Be aware of “quack” type PTs and chiropractors with their own xray equipment. They arent trained how to read these and make their patients pay for this “service”. [/quote]

Urbanski - Thanks for this reference.

i had a hip problem, lordosis and whatnot…i did a lot of single leg work and my lower back pain has diminished almost 100%.

only sucks that i sit 8-9hrs a day; f*cking “work”…psh…lame.