T Nation

Low Back Pain? Read This First

I started doing that, and I sprained my SI around a month ago. I feel it really helps, particularly with glute activation.

[quote]alternate wrote:
Larry, does the order of the exercises in the warmup matter?

Psycologically, I find it better to do the groiners and mountain climbers first - does that make it less effective?[/quote]

I don’t think it matters at all man, I mix up the order all the time

[quote]corstijeir wrote:
Larry I could kiss your face.

I did this before my workout and I feel great. Wasn’t even a leg night, can’t wait to see how it is for the 2nd day before squats tomorrow.

What do you have for upper body?[/quote]

That’s great to hear about your pain man… too bad you’re not a hot chick, lol.

Try this for upper body, however, I wouldn’t do the pec stretch before benching, I’d save it for after… and feel free to just do it against a wall if you don’t have a band.

[quote]666Rich wrote:
I started doing that, and I sprained my SI around a month ago. I feel it really helps, particularly with glute activation.[/quote]

great to hear man

[quote]Larry10 wrote:

[quote]corstijeir wrote:
Larry I could kiss your face.

I did this before my workout and I feel great. Wasn’t even a leg night, can’t wait to see how it is for the 2nd day before squats tomorrow.

What do you have for upper body?[/quote]

That’s great to hear about your pain man… too bad you’re not a hot chick, lol.

Try this for upper body, however, I wouldn’t do the pec stretch before benching, I’d save it for after… and feel free to just do it against a wall if you don’t have a band.

I’ll try this one out. Yeah if I was a hot chick I’d never leave the bathroom.

[quote]corstijeir wrote:

Yeah if I was a hot chick I’d never leave the bathroom.[/quote]

What chick does ever leave the bathroom?

What are they doing in there? We can only imagine.

Here is an odd tip that works for me. First, let me say I know my primary problems stem from being rear ended by an 18 wheeler almost 20 years ago. I was left with a couple of herniated disk in my lower back. I also have a herniated disk in my neck from once falling ~20 onto my back.

At any rate, I know what it feels like to fall to the floor in debilitating back pain.

Anyway, I’ve found that sleeping on the hard floor works miracles. I don’t know why it works, but when I feel pain I hit the floor for a couple of nights and viola’ the pain subsides. I do put a pillow under my upper legs but I do that in the bed as well.

YMMV.

I would like to hear thoughts from others about why sleeping on the floor works. Does anyone else do this?

haha, oh man, sorry to hear about all this shit, but everyone seems to be getting their hernias by calling from a building, or being in a car accident, or deadlifting 5 plates with shitty form.

I got mine from doing unweighted pistol squats while paying special attention to not let my back round too much!!!

In keeping in the spirit of this thread I will add that lifting, in general, for me, GREATLY reduces the occurrence of back pain.

Additionally, I have a nerve in one arm that is impinged and lifting completely eliminates pain and numbness. My Dr. told me it is the best thing I can do for the problem. He believes lifting prevents future nerve damage and in fact may have reverse problems. I think it has to do with increased blood supply.

"In just about every lower back injury, the cause is your posture. Sitting down all day, driving, etc etc. What this does is tighten up your hips, and weaken and deactivate the glutes, as well as roll our shoulders forward into kyphotic posture.

What you can take away from this is that almost all low back injruies are caused by tight hips and weak glutes. This is the CAUSE."

I would appreciate some form of prospective study to validate these statements.

go read “Neanderthal no more” by Mike Robertson and Eric Cressey… it should explain everything in better depth… as well read up on Bret Contreras, he speaks of how the glutes can cure low back injuries frequently.

Just use the T-Nation search, it will be the first thing that pops up.

I don’t have any studies, what I did was destroy my lower back until I couldn’t get off the toilet without help, then spent 6 months trying and failing to fix myself, then I finally did, and everything I had read up to that point made perfect sense.

My lower back sounds at lot less destroyed than yours was at the moment. I’m totally unimpaired to do any movement or play any sport.

BUT it seems a lot less likely to go away.

When I actually GOT it I was already doing tons of prehab back stuff (glute bridges, hip thrusts, bird-dogs, posterior-pelvic tilt planks…etc…, and recently, your warm-up) - and I have still been doing these prehab/rehab exercises every day for 6 months since the 'injury (though I can’t pinpoint when the injury actually occurred). It has made no difference…

Also, the feeling seems to be spreading to the upper back now - around the upper ribs.

have you posted pics of your posture?

Nope, but I can tell you I’ve definitely got anterior pelvic tilt - as I said I’ve been doing those glute activation exercises everyday for ages now - coming up to 2 years, but I’ve noticed no reduction in the anterior pelvic tilt.

Doing glute bridges, bird dogs, supermans, planks - not sure what else to do…

Keep up with the warm up everyday, but I know you’re already doing that.

I’d add in some hyperextnesions and kettlebell swings… something to really build the glutes instead of just activate them.

I’m deadling with some intense sciatica right now, from a damaged glute medius, and at times I limp when I walk… but after 2 sets of 25 on the hyperextension and some hip stretching I feel like a new man. I do those everyday.

If you’re not at the gym, I do banded good mornings a lot at home and really squeeze the but cheeks at the top of each rep, I find it’s very similar and almost just as good. I follow it up with a hip stretch, and it helps me out a lot.

It can’t hurt, and don’t worry, it won’t hurt

Quick update, sorry to say it Larry, but your routine isn’t helping so far!

I kind of thought it wouldn’t because I’ve been doing bits and pieces of that routine for two years now - a long time before my injury, during my injury and after it. Having said this, my ‘injury’ was not one specific event and I have no idea what caused it.

I am hesitant to go to the doctors and pay for a scan because, well, I’m in no pain and I’ve got no loss of movement.

However, do you think what I’m describing (a general and non-specific feeling of tightness that goes from the mid-back to the low back, around the sides of the body and around to the front of the body from the mid-abs to the lower-abs) sounds like degenerative disc disease? It could be that most of the discs in my back are simultaneously herniating and/or disintegrating at once, thus giving this feeling of tightness?

Hey everybody (: . I have an issue with my lower back - my psoas is strained and I can’t squat/lift or train without pain in my spine. Can you tell me please how to treat it so I can be okay as soon as possible. I do 1x-2x day stretching and foam rolling- on glutes, hammstrings, quads. Thanks in advance

I had a horrible lower back for years, with ‘blow outs’ happening a couple times per year. Making it hard to get out of a chair, or into one, or just walk straight, or stand straight etc…

Doctors and Chiros directed me to the “stretch it don’t work it approach”

Then I read something, online somewhere, about deadlifts and core and lower back etc… working it to strengthen it… to avoid these issues. I mountain bike, so, it had to do with standing and pedaling… and core strength and how much you should be able to DL etc…

Rock solid back now… deadlifts… started ohh… so very slow and light… but now, I am in the 1.5+bw range with reps… took 2years… but I can really put effort into my lifts now and not think twice about blow outs or have to ‘walk on egg shells’…

It is WILD to be able to deadlift now, and use MAX EFFORT, and not have to think twice about it.

Amazing. Lived with that shit for 15 years.

Adios!

Last night, I noticed my left ankle was feeling kind of tight, so I slowly twisted my foot to the side to stretch it - and since that moment I’ve had a mild, permanent tingling sensation on the base of my left foot.

To my knowledge, tingling in the foot can only be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc, which meant that last night I managed to herniate a disc standing bolt upright in the shower, with no weight on my back, and not even bending or flexing my spine at all. And this was after being thoroughly warmed up after doing all my prehab/rehab stuff. Great.

Larry do you mind posting links to the videos you embedded? Unfortunately I can’t view embedded videos on my iPad/iPhone and I’m not near my PC.

Cheers mate