T Nation

Looking for Specific Equipment


#1

Basically, I am looking for some handles that can be attached to a regular barbell to turn it into a Farmer's Walk bar (thus adding static stability). At the weight I am doing, dumbbells are very uncomfortable since they tend to slide to my wrists. I think this may be because I have small hands for my height. I had access to a trap bar but got yelled at for walking with it across the indoor "track".

Apparently the big scary weight would forever ruin the unobtainium clad floor if I set the weights down too hard. No, I was not dropping them on the ground like an asshole.

Whatever. If anyone knows where I can order some attachable handles send me a link. I tried amazon and all that shit with no luck.


#2

why not use one barbell for each hand?


#3

A barbell is neutrally stable, which is a bad thing.


#4

Just an idea... but maybe something you could work with.

Take a short length of chain rated heavy enough (hardware section at Home Depot/Lowes). Run that through a precut piece of black steel pipe (the stuff they use for gas lines; plumbing section). Use some pipe insulation, rubber or foam (also, plumbing section... but I'd lean toward a rubber) and wrap this around the barbell. Then, hook some carabiners to both ends of the chain, wrap around the pipe insulation and clip to the chain.

That would be one handle.

Basically: pipe as a handle, chain connects down to the barbell and clips with carabiners, then pipe insulation to keep the chain from sliding on the barbell. The chain may still slip in the pipe.. but, you could run a bolt through the pipe and through a chain link if it's a problem.

I'm not sure if my explanation makes sense, or if this would really work for you, since this introduces some rotational instability too unlike actual farmers walk handles... but I can't see that actually being a bad thing considering that farmers walks are great for training your overall stability.

If you need it, I could throw together a diagram, or even a photo.


#5

I found this with a quick search. I haven't tried it, but it looks like it should do the trick.

If you were outfitting a home gym, I'd suggest a pair of "triceps bars", sometimes called multi-purpose bars.

I don't think I know what that means.

And I don't think I know what that means. If anything, a barbell in each hand would be less stable, since they'd tend to wobble more due to the length, making stabilization more difficult.


#6

Awesome. Now I can do loaded carries.
50kg dumbells just get in the way :frowning:


#7

Here's a photo of what I was talking about. You know, since I'm one of those people who just has chain and carabiners and pipe insulation and black pipe lying around my gym. Lol.

Basically, something like this. I'd probably use rubber instead of foam insulation, and use a full size piece instead of two smaller pieces. And then, of course, have the chain cut off at the right length.

It actually turns out that if you get the lengths right, the chain isn't going to move in the pipe. If you notice in the photo, the vertical hanging links lock it in there nice and tight.


#8

Here's a quick lesson:

Statically stable: a good example is a pendulum. If you push the pendulum in any direction it will return to it's starting position. It will resist disturbances and return to an equilibrium position.

Neutrally stable: a ball on a kitchen table. If you push the ball it will roll, then stop where it is as soon as you remove the force. (just an analogy)

Statically unstable. A upside down pendulum. Any disturbance from its only state will result in a large displacement. The final position will not be the starting position.

A barbell is barely neutrally stable, kettlebells are statically stable, a kettlebell upside down is statically unstable.

I dont think I am going to lay out $70 for those sketchy things considering the make some claims about the squat but dont even show how they should be properly used on the bar. I think I may try a brokeass method like LoRez suggested.