T Nation

Longevity

TOKYO - "Japan’s oldest woman, 114-year-old Ura Koyama, died of pneumonia at a hospital in southern Japan, an official said Tuesday.

Koyama died Tuesday in Iizuka City, where she had been hospitalized, according to Akemi Hiromoto, a city official.

Japan’s oldest person is now Yone Minagawa, 112-year-old in Fukuoka, born on Jan. 4, 1893, according to the Health Ministry.

Japan ranks among nations with the world’s longest life spans. In 2003, Japanese women set a new record for life expectancy, at 85.3 years, while men could expect to live 78.3 years.

Experts say a traditional fish-based, low-fat diet may be Japan’s secret to long life."

I also think their longevity has at least something to do with their traditional low rate of body fat.

What do you over 35 lifters do to stay healthy and increase your chances of seeing a long life?

My great-aunt died at 114 years of age. I didn’t even know it was anywhere near a record. She wasn’t asian and I doubt her diet was based on fish. While I think genetics do play a role in this (as far as cellular death and possible immunity to infection), I think far too many try to pin-point one specific “secret” to long life when it is more than likely multi-factorial. I am sure state of mind has a much larger role to play than fish.

I’m attempting to achieve “fish” as a state of mind…

Why take chances?

Now, excuse me, I’ve got some serious floating in my chair to do while I gulp oxygen and generally ignore my work duties.

Time did a great article on longevity not too long ago.

And to generalize who lived longest:

non-smokers
people who ate wholefoods
exercised daily
never retired, mind kept busy until death.

Stay lucid, never retire.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
My great-aunt died at 114 years of age. I didn’t even know it was anywhere near a record. She wasn’t asian and I doubt her diet was based on fish. While I think genetics do play a role in this (as far as cellular death and possible immunity to infection), I think far too many try to pin-point one specific “secret” to long life when it is more than likely multi-factorial. I am sure state of mind has a much larger role to play than fish.[/quote]

wholly genetic.

Omega-3’s! But don’t tell anyone.!?

Nick

[quote]Professor X wrote:
My great-aunt died at 114 years of age. I didn’t even know it was anywhere near a record. She wasn’t asian and I doubt her diet was based on fish. While I think genetics do play a role in this (as far as cellular death and possible immunity to infection), I think far too many try to pin-point one specific “secret” to long life when it is more than likely multi-factorial. I am sure state of mind has a much larger role to play than fish.[/quote]

Hey Professor, welcome back!

Great post.

In Part II of the “Fear and Learning” article that ran today, I cover a talk given by the CDC. This was mentioned:

  • Japan spends half as much as the US on health care, but the Japanese have a better life expectancy than Americans. Why? Americans are fat and most Japanese aren’t.

According to many experts, it’s as simple as that.

[quote]vroom wrote:
I’m attempting to achieve “fish” as a state of mind…

Why take chances?

Now, excuse me, I’ve got some serious floating in my chair to do while I gulp oxygen and generally ignore my work duties.[/quote]

Maybe that’s the secret to Al Shades belief in his eventual greatness and the fact that he will neither age nor die.

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
In Part II of the “Fear and Learning” article that ran today, I cover a talk given by the CDC. This was mentioned:

  • Japan spends half as much as the US on health care, but the Japanese have a better life expectancy than Americans. Why? Americans are fat and most Japanese aren’t.

According to many experts, it’s as simple as that.

[/quote]

Hmmmm… You think it could be related to diet and exercise alone, or a general quality of life?

[quote]Bad John wrote:

Hmmmm… You think it could be related to diet and exercise alone, or a general quality of life?
[/quote]

In Part II of the article, I also sum up what was said about obesity and TV watching among Americans. Those who watch the most are the most overweight, basically.

Yet I caught a headline this morning saying something about the Japanese watch the most TV. (Didn’t read the whole article.) So, I’d say it’s a cultural thing related largely to diet.

Not sure about activity. Maybe they walk more? This would depend on rural vs. city life and a lot of other factors too, of course.

Oh, and I recall reading something about how this is all changing as Japan, Thailand and other countries are getting more Westernized. Then there’s the smoking issue. Some of these countries’ populations smoke much more than North Americans. (Not sure about Japan though.)

In Part II of the article, I also have something in there about how smokers can be “healthier” than non-smoking obese people, in some ways at least.

Interesting stuff.

I think alot of alot of problems are also stress related. Now many different people handle stress in different ways, but the Japanese tend to have a very, pardon the pun, Zen way of looking at life. Americans are amongst some of the most stressed out people in the world. I agree with Prof X that longevity is likely a multi-faceted thing, but I think stress is certainly one of those factors.

[quote]Kuz wrote:
vroom wrote:
I’m attempting to achieve “fish” as a state of mind…

Why take chances?

Now, excuse me, I’ve got some serious floating in my chair to do while I gulp oxygen and generally ignore my work duties.

Maybe that’s the secret to Al Shades belief in his eventual greatness and the fact that he will neither age nor die.[/quote]

No, I think it has more to do with him being a stupid 17 year old kid. :slight_smile:

I personally don’t see what the obsession is with living so long? I would rather run hard and die young anyday. Not saying I take too many completely reckless risks, but I don’t plan my life around extending it for 5 or 10 or even 20 years. I think it’s also important to note that people who live that long could probably give a shit how old they are. In other words, they stay, … mentally young, and thus their bodies have no choice but to follow suit.

Plus, I can’t wait to see what is on the other side, if there is one.

V

[quote]lothos wrote:
I think alot of alot of problems are also stress related. Now many different people handle stress in different ways, but the Japanese tend to have a very, pardon the pun, Zen way of looking at life. Americans are amongst some of the most stressed out people in the world. I agree with Prof X that longevity is likely a multi-faceted thing, but I think stress is certainly one of those factors.[/quote]

lothos:

You make a very good point.

In fact, while diet and exercise are two important factors I think how we “think” and our ability to smile through trying times is absolutely important to longevity.

[quote]Vegita wrote:
I personally don’t see what the obsession is with living so long? I would rather run hard and die young anyday. Not saying I take too many completely reckless risks, but I don’t plan my life around extending it for 5 or 10 or even 20 years. I think it’s also important to note that people who live that long could probably give a shit how old they are. In other words, they stay, … mentally young, and thus their bodies have no choice but to follow suit.

Plus, I can’t wait to see what is on the other side, if there is one.

V[/quote]

Excellent point…unfortuneatly, when we are 70+, you tend to forget that shit.

I am watching my great grandmother and grandparents wither away and it’s sad.

My great grandmother doesn’t know where she is, or who is family, and it’s a huge financial drain my my grandparents.

Personally, I’d rather go out in style and leave insurance money and my assets behind for my family.

“It’s better to burn out, that fade away”

There was some research that showed when Japanese switched to a western diet, they lost their health benefits.

When Dairy Queen started to sell in Japan, everyone said they loved it, but they were not coming back. They discovered that they were eating about half of it and threw the rest away. They could not eat as much Americans can, and felt a little cheated that they had to throw half of it away.

Then the larger percent of their diet comprised of fish. We all know the benefits of fish oil, but in Japan fish is as common as burgers are here.

Now as far as genetics, I am trying to find out more about a study of twins. People who have looked at the study say there is like a 25 - 35% genetic factor in aging, while the rest is apparently environmental.

Oops, out of time. I’ll cut this short.

[quote]Chris Shugart wrote:
In Part II of the “Fear and Learning” article that ran today, I cover a talk given by the CDC. This was mentioned:

  • Japan spends half as much as the US on health care, but the Japanese have a better life expectancy than Americans. Why? Americans are fat and most Japanese aren’t.

According to many experts, it’s as simple as that.

[/quote]
Perhaps less reliance on medical health care is a reason for the longevity of the Japanese.

The University of Toronto released a study that found that about 100,000 people in 1998? or 1999? died while hospitalized from ingesting perscription medication IN ACCORDANCE with their doctors instructions. The L.A. Times had a small article on this a few years ago.

Not to mention others who die from mistakes made by M.D.'s

If you are seriously interested in longevity, I’d suggest checking out the lef.org site.

While they are a little radical in their views (i.e. only reporting on positive findings in support of their product viewpoints it seems), they do discuss a lot of science and act on behalf of consumer rights concerning supplementation.

[quote]vroom wrote:
If you are seriously interested in longevity, I’d suggest checking out the lef.org site.

[/quote]

They also sell the most complete multi I have ever seen in my life. I am fairly sure it is high quality. Just 14 capsules a day.