T Nation

Long-Term Real Estate Investing

“In the 2080s, the average summer high will probably be 102 degrees in Jacksonville, 100 degrees in Memphis, 96 degrees in Atlanta, and 91 degrees in Chicago and Washington, according to the study published in the April edition of the peer-reviewed journal Climate and posted on the NASA Web site Thursday.”
— from CNN today

Thoughts? This would seem to imply a population shift northward. Land adjoining the Great Lakes might become very desireable. Good investment relative to kids, grandkids?

[quote]Headhunter wrote:
“In the 2080s, the average summer high will probably be 102 degrees in Jacksonville, 100 degrees in Memphis, 96 degrees in Atlanta, and 91 degrees in Chicago and Washington, according to the study published in the April edition of the peer-reviewed journal Climate and posted on the NASA Web site Thursday.”
— from CNN today

Thoughts? This would seem to imply a population shift northward. Land adjoining the Great Lakes might become very desireable. Good investment relative to kids, grandkids?[/quote]

Doubtful…

In Texas those are the averages already. If you look at the stats the lone star state has had some of the most steady population growth over the past decade. So Heat is not the only determing factor.

[quote]haney1 wrote:
Headhunter wrote:
“In the 2080s, the average summer high will probably be 102 degrees in Jacksonville, 100 degrees in Memphis, 96 degrees in Atlanta, and 91 degrees in Chicago and Washington, according to the study published in the April edition of the peer-reviewed journal Climate and posted on the NASA Web site Thursday.”
— from CNN today

Thoughts? This would seem to imply a population shift northward. Land adjoining the Great Lakes might become very desireable. Good investment relative to kids, grandkids?

Doubtful…

In Texas those are the averages already. If you look at the stats the lone star state has had some of the most steady population growth over the past decade. So Heat is not the only determing factor.
[/quote]

I agree it’s doubtful. Arizona has been growing like crazy and it gets over 110. Where I live is growing like crazy and the average temp in the summer is 105.

[quote]Headhunter wrote:
“In the 2080s, the average summer high will probably be 102 degrees in Jacksonville, 100 degrees in Memphis, 96 degrees in Atlanta, and 91 degrees in Chicago and Washington, according to the study published in the April edition of the peer-reviewed journal Climate and posted on the NASA Web site Thursday.”
— from CNN today

Thoughts? This would seem to imply a population shift northward. Land adjoining the Great Lakes might become very desireable. Good investment relative to kids, grandkids?[/quote]

welcome to texas.

the heat isn’t that bad, in the coastal region it is the humidity that will get you.

in west texas, where it breaks 100 almost all summer long, you feel pretty cool really. you just have to be careful to make yourself drink water or you will dry up faster than you can say uncle.

hell, 91 degrees is a crisp spring morning.

[quote]texasguy wrote:
Headhunter wrote:
“In the 2080s, the average summer high will probably be 102 degrees in Jacksonville, 100 degrees in Memphis, 96 degrees in Atlanta, and 91 degrees in Chicago and Washington, according to the study published in the April edition of the peer-reviewed journal Climate and posted on the NASA Web site Thursday.”
— from CNN today

Thoughts? This would seem to imply a population shift northward. Land adjoining the Great Lakes might become very desireable. Good investment relative to kids, grandkids?

welcome to texas.

the heat isn’t that bad, in the coastal region it is the humidity that will get you.

in west texas, where it breaks 100 almost all summer long, you feel pretty cool really. you just have to be careful to make yourself drink water or you will dry up faster than you can say uncle.

hell, 91 degrees is a crisp spring morning.
[/quote]

First, Texas is IMO the best and finest state in the country. The people are the best of the best.

The humidity is the issue. If its 100 degrees and humid like crazy, then wouldn’t more people shift away from that? West Texas and Arizona have low humidity but places like Memphis and Atlanta are pretty miserable when summertime hits. Maybe a shift to dry and warm more so than north. Amarillo has a great future, perhaps?

[quote]Headhunter wrote:
texasguy wrote:
Headhunter wrote:
“In the 2080s, the average summer high will probably be 102 degrees in Jacksonville, 100 degrees in Memphis, 96 degrees in Atlanta, and 91 degrees in Chicago and Washington, according to the study published in the April edition of the peer-reviewed journal Climate and posted on the NASA Web site Thursday.”
— from CNN today

Thoughts? This would seem to imply a population shift northward. Land adjoining the Great Lakes might become very desireable. Good investment relative to kids, grandkids?

welcome to texas.

the heat isn’t that bad, in the coastal region it is the humidity that will get you.

in west texas, where it breaks 100 almost all summer long, you feel pretty cool really. you just have to be careful to make yourself drink water or you will dry up faster than you can say uncle.

hell, 91 degrees is a crisp spring morning.

First, Texas is IMO the best and finest state in the country. The people are the best of the best.

The humidity is the issue. If its 100 degrees and humid like crazy, then wouldn’t more people shift away from that? West Texas and Arizona have low humidity but places like Memphis and Atlanta are pretty miserable when summertime hits. Maybe a shift to dry and warm more so than north. Amarillo has a great future, perhaps?

[/quote]

I live in Houston, and have all my life. The humidity sucks, but it really only lasts from may - October.

Winter is pretty much like spring time in most places. There is something about this place that keeps you here.

Amarillo… doubtful unless they move the stock yards, and can create a better revenue source.

Not to mention Houston is a part of the new super highway that goes between Canada, and Mexico City. It is set to be the largest city with a shipping port between those two points. So this place will only grow over the next few years.

[quote]haney1 wrote:
Headhunter wrote:
texasguy wrote:
Headhunter wrote:
“In the 2080s, the average summer high will probably be 102 degrees in Jacksonville, 100 degrees in Memphis, 96 degrees in Atlanta, and 91 degrees in Chicago and Washington, according to the study published in the April edition of the peer-reviewed journal Climate and posted on the NASA Web site Thursday.”
— from CNN today

Thoughts? This would seem to imply a population shift northward. Land adjoining the Great Lakes might become very desireable. Good investment relative to kids, grandkids?

welcome to texas.

the heat isn’t that bad, in the coastal region it is the humidity that will get you.

in west texas, where it breaks 100 almost all summer long, you feel pretty cool really. you just have to be careful to make yourself drink water or you will dry up faster than you can say uncle.

hell, 91 degrees is a crisp spring morning.

First, Texas is IMO the best and finest state in the country. The people are the best of the best.

The humidity is the issue. If its 100 degrees and humid like crazy, then wouldn’t more people shift away from that? West Texas and Arizona have low humidity but places like Memphis and Atlanta are pretty miserable when summertime hits. Maybe a shift to dry and warm more so than north. Amarillo has a great future, perhaps?

I live in Houston, and have all my life. The humidity sucks, but it really only lasts from may - October.

Winter is pretty much like spring time in most places. There is something about this place that keeps you here.

Amarillo… doubtful unless they move the stock yards, and can create a better revenue source.

Not to mention Houston is a part of the new super highway that goes between Canada, and Mexico City. It is set to be the largest city with a shipping port between those two points. So this place will only grow over the next few years.[/quote]

yeah, i’m originally from houston (katy) but am in college in nw texas.

the humidity sucks ass and it does indeed last half the year.

the dry heat up here is definately more bearable, but houston is by far my favorite city in the state regardless of the weather.

[quote]haney1 wrote:
There is something about this place that keeps you here.
[/quote]

I concur.

Yes, it gets hot. If you have property, plant some trees.

[quote]Chewie wrote:
haney1 wrote:
There is something about this place that keeps you here.

I concur.

Yes, it gets hot. If you have property, plant some trees.
[/quote]

side note: Mike keeps telling me you want to take the handgun course.

Let me know when your up for it.

[quote]texasguy wrote:
yeah, i’m originally from houston (katy)
[/quote]
I hate that part of I-10!

Which college?

It is the other half that is nice!

[quote]
the dry heat up here is definately more bearable, but houston is by far my favorite city in the state regardless of the weather. [/quote]

Yeah, I lived in NM for a little while. I always laughed when people talked about how hot it was there. I kept thinking it feels like spring in Houston.