T Nation

Long Limbed Weightlifter

Hello T-Nation,

(Lost my old login + password so I had to create a new username)

I am 22 years of age with 5 years lifting experience at 6’2", 230 lbs. My body type is between meso and endo. Large thighs, thick chest, narrow shoulders, medium waist. I have no issue gaining mass.

I am a hybrid lifter. I switch between bodybuilding and powerlifting (leaning more towards powerlifting for strength)depending on my work schedule. I will usually strength train every 3 months and take a month off (bodybuilding).

My sets never go beyond 6 reps no matter if I am powerlifting or bodybuilding. I tried a few programs off the site including Waterburys Fullbody program, 5x5, Doggcrapp, etc.

The problem I am having, as of the last few months, is improving my max lifts.

Currently, my max lifts are stuck at:

Max Bench: 320lbs
Max Squat: 425lbs
Max Deadlift: 505lbs

I am looking for some advice on a powerlifting (strength increasing) program for long limbed lifters.

Any advice would be appreciated.

Thank you!

If I were looking to increase strength, I’d go for 5/3/1:

Thanks bud. Appreciate the link.

I guess “5/3/1” is the new “cool” program huh guys.

LOL

[quote]mr popular wrote:
I guess “5/3/1” is the new “cool” program huh guys.

LOL[/quote]

What would you suggest then?

[quote]jan_mul wrote:
(Lost my old login + password so I had to create a new username)[/quote]
Just out of curiosity, what was your old login?

Any particular reason?

Even though you’re not training for size, you might be able to glean some technique tips from these two articles:


For strength-building, it’s more a matter of addressing your weak points/leverage disadvantages. For example, with longer arms, you’re probably a more tri/shoulder-dominant bencher, so things like floor presses and board work would be more beneficial.

You might want to look around the Powerlifting forum here to see what some of the taller guys are doing.

[quote]mr popular wrote:
I guess “5/3/1” is the new “cool” program huh guys.

LOL[/quote]
Dang, man. You really don’t like any non-traditional ways of training, huh? :wink:

But really, when the dude is asking for a strength-based program, how is 5/3/1 not a valid suggestion?

It’s no less valid than any of the other trendy programs that have been recommended in the past. It’s also no more valid.

I was merely commenting on the fact that everybody on this website jumps on a new bandwagon every 6 months or so, insisting this program is the be-all-end-all… except that it used to be rippetoes, and before that it was WS4SB, or bill starr’s program, or Waterbury’s programs, etc.etc. the list goes on.

It’s a little funny, and the guys making the most progress are consistently the ones that make their own program. So that tends to be what I recommend.

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
jan_mul wrote:
(Lost my old login + password so I had to create a new username)
I think it was something like johnnyboog1. I am a longtime lurker. I read the articles, etc.

My sets never go beyond 6 reps no matter if I am powerlifting or bodybuilding.
Any particular reason?[/quote]

I just like to lift heavy. If I can get more than 6 reps with a particular weight, then I up the weight instead of doing more reps. Its just the way I have always trained. I definitely need to switch it up. I just get bored of high reps (stereotypical lifter - love heavy weights, hate cardio)

[quote]I am looking for some advice on a powerlifting (strength increasing) program for long limbed lifters.
Even though you’re not training for size, you might be able to glean some technique tips from these two articles:


Appreciate the links!

I am definitly tri/shoulder dominant with my benches, however, I have extremely weak shoulders. My shoulders are definitly my weakest body part. I have no delt development; poor posture has given me rounded shoulders.

Thanks man, I’ll check it out. Appreciate all the information you’ve given me.

[quote]mr popular wrote:
I was merely commenting on the fact that everybody on this website jumps on a new bandwagon every 6 months or so, insisting this program is the be-all-end-all… except that it used to be rippetoes, and before that it was WS4SB, or bill starr’s program, or Waterbury’s programs, etc.etc. the list goes on.[/quote]
Fair enough, and I kinda agree. I interviewed Rippetoe because Starting Strength was popular at the time, but that doesn’t necessarily mean I think it’s the program the every lifter should begin with… but that also doesn’t mean it’s a bad plan for many lifters. (I know, I know. You disagree. Vehemently.)

It’s easy enough for a beginner to develop information overload with the dozens, if not hundreds, of training plans out there. And it doesn’t exactly help that every time a new program comes into the spotlight, people seem to forget about what “used to” work in preference for the latest and greatest. The newer stuff might be “better”, but that doesn’t mean the older stuff suddenly becomes “bad” or ineffective.

I get where you’re coming from on this, but in the Beginners forum, 9 times out of 10 you can’t trust the newbie lifter to design their own program and have it be nearly as effective as a program or template a coach has already laid out, which they can follow and progress with while still learning how their body works and reacts to training.

[quote]jan_mul wrote:
need to switch it up. I just get bored of high reps (stereotypical lifter - love heavy weights, hate cardio)[/quote]
I think you definitely qualify as a powerlifting if anyhting over 6 reps counts as cardio. Ha.

Just to throw another link your way, this one (and its Part 1) have some postural and general exercise tips that might help:

Also, sounds like it would be worth considering a shoulder specialization phase if that’s a noticeable weak point in your lifting and your physique. Giving them the spotlight for 6-8 weeks would pay dividends in the long run for strength, appearance, and joint health.

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
I get where you’re coming from on this, but in the Beginners forum, 9 times out of 10 you can’t trust the newbie lifter to design their own program and have it be nearly as effective as a program or template a coach has already laid out, which they can follow and progress with while still learning how their body works and reacts to training.[/quote]

I don’t disagree that beginners are consistently awful at making their own routines. I know I was.

I just think that a sense of personal responsibility in training should be at the forefront from the very beginning. There are guys that have been lifting weights for years that come on here and ask what program to do next because they really don’t think they could make their own, and that is just sad. (needless to say their results always suck).

I wasn’t bashing 5/3/1 at all, merely the simple minded people on this site and others that bounce from one popular program to the next each month. Although I personally would never do a program that complicated, some people seem to like it, and it doesn’t appear to have any huge glaring flaws that neglect entire muscle groups cough hack.

I think as long as a beginner is moving towards the idea of finding their own routine and what works for their body, then it’s fine (although a lot of these programs come with a heavy tint of bias towards one philosophy on training that can send people down the wrong path, which is a whole nother bag of shit).

If I was in charge my “beginners start here” idea would have been stickied and that would have been the end of it. lol

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]jan_mul wrote:
need to switch it up. I just get bored of high reps (stereotypical lifter - love heavy weights, hate cardio)[/quote]
I think you definitely qualify as a powerlifting if anyhting over 6 reps counts as cardio. Ha.

Just to throw another link your way, this one (and its Part 1) have some postural and general exercise tips that might help:

Also, sounds like it would be worth considering a shoulder specialization phase if that’s a noticeable weak point in your lifting and your physique. Giving them the spotlight for 6-8 weeks would pay dividends in the long run for strength, appearance, and joint health.[/quote]

Thanks again Chris. I appreciate every bit of your information.

I’ll have to search the site for a decent shoulder specialization program. Technically any shoulder program I come across will be better than what I do now, which is basically nothing.