T Nation

Log Overhead Press instability experiment


#1

After my regular strict log overhead pressing I decided to do an experiment. The idea was to create the instability effect that a bamboo bar brings, but apply it to a log overhead press since stability in your core and shoulder girdle plays a huge role in the amount of weight you can move in this event.

I hung 44lb and 28lb kettle bells from each side using light bands. It worked really well and was very challenging. Definitely another level of shoulder pump and soreness following this. I think I will continue to add this as an accessory for a few weeks and see if it helps to up my 1RM.

In addition, It is supposed to be great for prehab and building stabilizers. For those of you who log press, you will know that when you are grinding out a hard rep, stabilizing the weight and fighting to keep it (or get it back) into the groove is the biggest challenge of all. Hopefully this will help me do that.

Anyone else try anything like this as an accessory?


#2

I WILL be trying this next time I use my log! Fuck yeah man, thanks for sharing.


#3

Really good idea! How did it feel on your abdominal muscles?


#4

Vinny: It was great man, I was sore not only in my shoulders but also in my triceps and all over my upper back, I think it is going to work out well. Definitely let me know how it goes for you


Odin: As you can see in the video, my body was all over the place like I was having a seizure. It really worked everything from my feet (constantly adjusting to keep my balance), to my core trying to stabilize the log, to my upper back trying to keep a good foundation to press from and of course my shoulder girdle and tri’s to actually do the press. It worked all of the parts in the chain that I use in a heavy press except without the wear and tear of the heavier weights. I don’t see how this can’t help me, but only time will tell.


#5

I’ve done this with a barbell and had a similar feeling to you of working everything in the chain. I haven’t seen a huge increase in my max, but results may vary.


#6

Looks like a fun way to mix things up and a good way to make lighter weights more challenging which can in turn help with recovery, although I am not sure how much carryover this would have to actually pressing a log with regular weights loaded. The group that I could see benefiting most would be those who have tremendous gym strength but not as much proficiency with implements, since something like this forces you to dial in your technique a bit.