T Nation

Living Well with a Health Condition

Since I found out a few weeks ago that I have hypothyroidism, I have discovered that I am not the only one!!
And there may be some of you out there that are living with other health conditions(diabetes, heart issues, etc)

In the beginning, how did you make sense of all the information out there while dealing with mainstream physicians, dietitians, etc?

How do YOU live well, and maintain a ‘normal,’ life inside the gym and out?

Thanks,

Betty

http://denver.yourhub.com/Evergreen/Stories/Health-Fitness/Diet/Story~390030.aspx

Interesting article! And who know Oprah had a thyroid problem? I must be behind in the times!

Everyone has thyroid issues anymore - I blame fluoridated water. :slight_smile:

I have Hashimoto’s, which means my thyroid is slowly dying, and will be dead at some point, but a bit of medication should make the transition from normal person to drug-reliant beast a bit easier.

[quote]pushmepullme wrote:
Everyone has thyroid issues anymore - I blame fluoridated water. :slight_smile:

[/quote]

Whatever the cause, it is estimated that 10% of women have thyroid issues, and that is expected to rise as high as 45% when they reach menopause (based on 2005 statistics compiled by the National Institutes of Health)

There is plenty of information out there, and most thyroid conditions are easy to manage.

I sure hope its easy to manage…
My number one wish is for this fatigue to go away…of course I want to lose the weight as well, but being tired all the time SUCKS even more I think…cause its not something that you can control…

you can to an extent…I sleep well at night, but I still wake tired and then its all downhill through the rest of the day…

*pity party over, lol
off to the gym!

[quote]mom-in-MD wrote:
I sure hope its easy to manage…
[/quote]

I should have added in “once you find the right dose and the right meds.”

For hypo, they start low and taper up.

You’ll do fine.

There are many natural ways to support the thyroid as well. Increased iodine is one. Many articles and books on the subject. It is just a matter of trial and error to find what works for you. Seems I have sub-clinical hypothyroidism as well and have been working on it for a couple of months now…

Yes,
I’ve heard good and bad things about Natural ways to support the thyroid…

Question to those with thyroid probs…how long did it take you to figure out how low you could/should go in carbs to keep your weight in check?

From what I’ve been reading a lot of women can’t seem to lose the weight without cutting basically all carbs out…(accept for veggies and maybe some gluten free stuff!)

How true is this for you?

[quote]mom-in-MD wrote:
Yes,
I’ve heard good and bad things about Natural ways to support the thyroid…

Question to those with thyroid probs…how long did it take you to figure out how low you could/should go in carbs to keep your weight in check?

From what I’ve been reading a lot of women can’t seem to lose the weight without cutting basically all carbs out…(accept for veggies and maybe some gluten free stuff!)

How true is this for you?

[/quote]

I have found for me in the past that it is a very fine line with carbs. It also seems to vary based on my training cycle – ie the heavier I am training seems the more carbs I can get away with. But for the most part I do have to cut almost all carbs out of my diet with the exception of veggies.

Lately, since I have been working with natural ways to help my thyroid it seems I can have small amounts tho. 1 cup of brown rice or a sweet potato/yam every couple of days and it does not seem to hurt my weight any.

I have a few health conditions, type 1 diabetes and hypothyroid, but they are such a part of my life that I really never thought about how to maintain a “normal” life, this just is my life.

Hyporthyroid never phased me one way of the other. I mean it sucked up until I got the pills but after that, outside of blood work, I really don’t worry to much.

Diabetes is sort of different as it has had a much greater affect on intensity of exercise, length of time spent in the gym, and food consumption.

For instance the amount of insulin I need daily changes with what kind of work out I do and the intensity. This is something I have to keep up with because the affects can damage my health and responsibilities I have. Someimes I can manage it and sometimes I can’t and then I pass out.

Dieting is a bit difficult as I need to eat a more carbs then would be ideal for weight loss. I keep my carbs as low as possible yet I still need a certain amount to take the insulin with. Plus every time my blood sugar is low, an instance that is increased with exercise, the more carbs I need to eat…

So yeah that is kinda a never ending battle. The key is maintain good blood glucose numbers in order to keep yourself from having eat food you don’t need.

But really I have been doing this for awhile now and I don’t really think about it… unless someone asks of course :slight_smile:

I’ve been on Armour Thyroid for about three years now, and I feel much more “normal” than I did on the synthetic hormones. The Anabolic Diet has worked for me. Good Luck.

How did I miss this thread??

I had a partial thyroidectomy several years ago for thyroid cancer (a single malignant tumor). I’m on Synthroid and it’s been fine. At one point my levels were off and I had to get hyperthyroidism under control (that sucked, my startle response went crazy and I was having panic attacks).

Occasionally I’ll fail to take my pills for one reason or another (honestly? if they’re not on the coffee pot in the morning I forget and won’t think of them again until they re-enter my visual field) and slide into lethargy, but as long as I stay on them I am entirely myself. I don’t struggle with weight any more than I did prior to the loss of the thyroid. Which is to say, I suppose, not at all. As long as I’m active and eat reasonably, I’m good.

I see it as a no-big-deal. Do the standard stuff to get the weight off, then live your life as usual. :slight_smile:

My wife had acquired hypothyroidism by way of radiation therapy to kill a benign tumor on her pituitary gland in 1994. Since then she has been on prescribed Synthroid, low dosage, and she gets her hormones checked every six months.

[quote]pushmepullme wrote:
Everyone has thyroid issues anymore - I blame fluoridated water. :slight_smile:

I have Hashimoto’s, which means my thyroid is slowly dying, and will be dead at some point, but a bit of medication should make the transition from normal person to drug-reliant beast a bit easier.[/quote]

my mom has hashimoto’s as well. back in 2004 they took out half her thyroid. I always get mine checked every chance I get. Thyroid issues seem pretty normal. I fill tons of rx’s for synthroid,levothyroxine and such.

As for health issues, I think we all suffer from something. My therapist told me the best thing to do when ever you are diagnosed with anything is to research all you can about it. The more you know the better you can make sense of everything.
Good luck with everything mom-in-md!!! Thyroid issues aren’t fun and from what I understand can be hard to deal with and adjust too.

Treating the thyroid any way BUT naturally is a disaster…Synthroid is a waste of time and money…that is basic physiology…Synthroid is T4, which is not the active form.

Either use Armour or get compounded T3 from a compounding pharmacy…or you will end up having your thyroid out and that puts you in a downward spiral…just my two cents…

[quote]rehabman28 wrote:
Treating the thyroid any way BUT naturally is a disaster…Synthroid is a waste of time and money…that is basic physiology…Synthroid is T4, which is not the active form.

Either use Armour or get compounded T3 from a compounding pharmacy…or you will end up having your thyroid out and that puts you in a downward spiral…just my two cents…[/quote]

Do you have thyroid issues?

I know what it’s like when I’m on and I know what it’s like when I’m off as does everyone who has experienced problems with their thyroid.
T4 is a prohormone and a reserve for T3. T4 is converted to T3 in the tissues by deiodinases.

Sorry about your condition. I don’t know too much about it but I can speak about how you can learn to live a normal life after a diagnosis. 6 months ago I was diagnosed with Ulcerative colitis, an inflammation of the intestines. I lost 40 pounds in about 3 weeks, in and out of the hospital, was weak, stopped eating, etc.
Beyond the physical obstacles and distress was the mental and emotional pain.

I felt like there was something wrong with me; I had to, and am still working to accept that I have a chronic illness. But don’t let your body take over your mind. If you have a great enough reason in your mind your body can overcome it. Treat your symptoms as best as you can. But continue to live your life as best as you can.

I began Eric Cressey’s Maximum Strength program and am now the strongest I have ever been in my life. I put 45 lbs back on and continue to just try and live life. I do appreciate simple things a bit more now. Best of luck with everything. Have faith and believe that things will always work out the way they are supposed to.

[quote]rehabman28 wrote:
Treating the thyroid any way BUT naturally is a disaster…Synthroid is a waste of time and money…that is basic physiology…Synthroid is T4, which is not the active form.

Either use Armour or get compounded T3 from a compounding pharmacy…or you will end up having your thyroid out and that puts you in a downward spiral…just my two cents…[/quote]

I’m going to agree to a certain degree - my mom has mega thyroid issues, and tried Armour, but it messed her up because her body doesn’t process T3 right (for unrelated issues). I am a firm believer in Armour, and take it myself, but the thyroid is so personal to the patient that there is no absolute yes or no. I think for hypo without other issues, Armour is the best. But, it is not one size fits all.