T Nation

Lingering Shoulder Issue *Update*


#1

So at the beginning of August I heard/felt a little snap in my left shoulder while doing push ups. Anyway, the doctor said I had "bursitis" and I stayed away from weights for 3 months. I know that's longer than advised but I didn't wanna fuck around with my shoulder.

Anyway, I got back to training mid-November the the first two weeks were great. Started re-gaining the size I lost, feeling good, no pain, no injury, and everything was cool. I stayed away from bench press entirely though. I stuck with DB bench, flys, etc. I did light weight military presses just to get the strength back and I seemed fine. No pain, no nothing so I slowly increased the weight. I only worked shoulders once per week and was still pretty paranoid.

Last week I decided to BENCH PRESS and well...the problem is back. I still have full mobility with no pain (as a result of movement) but I have this weird dull pain when waking up in the morning and in the middle of the night. Its weird. I can still lift but when idle...its just this low-key throb. I dont know how else to explain it.

Anyway, I have an MRI scheduled for Monday but I wanted to see if anyone in the Nation had anything similar just so I'm ready for the worst. I really hope its not some bullshit where I cant train for a few more months.

Thanks.


#2

eh, i was diagnosed with bicep tendonitits. Then the doctor changed his mind and called it a slap tear to the labrum, then he called it bursitis.

And that was After the MRi haha..

you dont sleep on your shoulders do you?


#3

I hurt my shoulder benching about a month ago.

There's a shitload of info on this site and articles on shoulder rehab. Check them out and do the exercises.


#4

This is a good question- about sleeping on your shoulders. Have you had problems sleeping on your shoulders? I have. I've tried to work on sleeping on my back. It seems that each shoulder I sleep on, starts to act up over a period of time


#5

Shit...I have been sleeping a lot on my shoulders. Bad habit. I try NOT to but end up waking up on my side but "on" my left shoulder.

Man I just hope nothing is torn or anything like that. I'd hate to be out of training mode AGAIN.


#6

Got the MRI done and saw the doc. Luckily there is no rotator cuff tear.

Anyway here is the doctors report (I dont really quite understand it and he didnt explain it to well so maybe some of you guys can break it down for me):


Findings: There is a Type II acromion with mild lateral downsloping. There is mild degenerative change involving the AC joint. These findings produce mild to moderate indentation upon the supraspinatus tendon. The rotator cuff is intact with no evidence of a full thickness tear. There is no retraction of the supraspinatus musculotendinous junction. There is a small amount of fluid within the subacromial space. There is no fluid in the subdeltoid space. The biceptial tendon is in normal location. The remaining muscles around the shoulder joint are well developed. There is slight irregularity involving the anterior/superior glenoid labrum. There is no fracture or other bony abnormality noted.


LOL so whats wrong? He told me "shoulder instability" and recommended physical therapy for 8 weeks and said stay away from the military press at all costs.


#7

sounds like nothings wrong, stop being a wimp.


#8

You sound stupid, stop posting.


#9

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.


#10

Don't feel bad, I saw him in another thread, and this one just confirmed my opinion.


#11

Anyone credible wanna help me with this?


#12

Browsing online and found this:

http://health.yahoo.com/musculoskeletal-causes/rotator-cuff-disorders-cause/healthwise--aa11149.html

might be somewhat helpful.

I've had two shoulder surgeries on my left, one arthroscopic and one open to repair a SLAP lesion (I've had about 16 dislocations on my left and 2 on my right). My only advice is to listen to what the ortho says and stop bench pressing, just use DBs. I've been pain and injury free for two years. I think one thing that has really helped this is developing the muscles around the scapula. Make sure that you do as much or more pulling than you do pushing. The four rotator cuff muscles are important, but so are all of the scapular stabilizers; If you ever want to push big weight, these will need to be solid.

Gook luck


#13

Ahh thanks buddy. Good info.

When you say "pulling" what do you mean specifically? My routine consists of rows, chin ups, pull ups, deadlifts, etc etc (obviously not all on the same day) but what should I specifically add to strengthen the muscles around the scapula?

And yeah, fuck benching and military presses. I'm way to paranoid to do any of those now. Besides the lateral raise is there anything else I can do to develop the shoulders or do I just need to do a shit load of raises?

Thanks again man I appreciate it.


#14

Do the broomstick shoulder dislocations.


#15

Disclaimer: I'm no M.D., just a rotator cuff tear patient, so I've done a lot of self-research and picked my ortho's brain. A type II acromion process dips down (is downward sloping) and leaves less space for the supraspinatus tendon (lateral rotator cuff muscle) than a type I (most desirable) acromion does, but is better than a type III (least desirable and most curved).

This means that overhead movement carries a higher risk of impingement for you that a person with a type I acromion. As far as degenerative change of the AC joint, it sounds like maybe pre-arthritic acromio-clavicular joint (junction of the collarbone and clavicle).

If there is a small amount of fluid in the sub-acromial space, you may have a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear (usually overcome w/PT); the body will fill these spaces with fluid, leaving a 'clear' impression on the MRI. The glenoid labrum is a cartilaginous triangle-shaped 'pocket', if you will, into which the humerus fits, but I don't know enough about that to talk any shit, really.

I would take his advice and stop pressing, otherwise, you could have a full-thickness supraspinatus tear to show for it, like me, and that won't heal itself.


#16

Wow. Awesome explanation.

One more question though: The doctor said I can do floor presses and neutral grip presses (none over head though). Did you continue to do any of those? If not, how long did you stop doing those? He basically made it sound like I can do presses (except bench) as long as "you can see your elbows from the corner of your eyes." I figured DB floor presses shouldn't be too taxing on the shoulder. From your experience what do you think?