T Nation

Limitations of a Gym.

Curious question. I am avoiding serious heavy weight training because I poses genetics of an orge… As soon as I start lifting weight I build muscle mass extremely fast. Yeah I know I will get flamed about “Dood are you dumb”.

There is a reason. I live in South Korea and all I want to do is fight. Kickboxing/Muay Thai. Unfortunatley having ogre genes it puts me out of the weight catagories of most Koreans. at 5’11" and 85 kilos I am in the Twilight zone of weight and there is no openents I can fight. The only openents I can fight are giants guys that are 6’4" and up and 110+ kilos plus.

Any who my kickboxing gym has very limited resources as far as weights go… The free weights stop at 10 kilos barebells and easy bar free weights are welded at 26kilos. Bench weights are maxed out at 60 kilos. I can manage these easily unlike my Korean counterparts that are featherweights compared to me.

Any who can I just increase the volume of instead of the weight? Currently I rotate 6 excercises at 3 sets at 20-40 reps depending on the excercise… Will I sustain or gain weight if I increase the amount of reps?

Read the two articles that are stickied at the top of this forum. Those posts and the articles they link to should answer most of your questions. You may also want to search Chad Waterbury’s articles for information. He has written several on the topic of MMA.

More volume is actually a big part of hypertrophy. Most hypertrophy programs suggest 30-40 reps per muscle group total. After ~12 reps per set you start to get into the muscle endurance range though which might be helpful to you.

I think some of the lower ranges 1-5 reps might also be helpful for you in explosive lifts (oly variations) and some harder versions of traditional lifts (overhead squats, lunging military presses, single leg lifts), but I don’t know enough about training for fighting specifically to be certain.

Increasing reps should just increase your endurance.

Have you tried other bodyweight exercises like handstand pushups or pullups, one legged squats…? These can offer nearly infinite resistance by going to one arm versions once you master the two armed versions and require little or no equipment.

Or how about pushups with one or more of your featherweight friends sitting on your back or squats or strair running with a featherweight on your shoulders? Be creative!

Move to a country where the competitors aren’t all in the red zone of BMI as pathetically underweight. Your weight at your height is average ish for anybody with some semblance of strength. I have a 5’ll friend at 95ish kilos who isn’t fat by any definition yet not that strong.

Or, you could take a break from competition and focus on gaining strenght and some size while keeping most of your agility so you can compete in the heavier weight classes.

[quote]carletheredge wrote:
Read the two articles that are stickied at the top of this forum. Those posts and the articles they link to should answer most of your questions. You may also want to search Chad Waterbury’s articles for information. He has written several on the topic of MMA.

[/quote]

While normally this would be a good post, this guy isn’t asking about anything that would be answered in the stickies. sorry nice try. he is trying to figure out how to get in a good workout for a specific athletic purpose with very limited weight, not asking what he needs to know in order to get big. All i can say to the OP is to try and find a different gym. You will not get much of anything except endurance by doing what you are doing now.

You say your barbell only goes up to 60k? Maybe you can perform Olympic lifts along with bodyweight exercises if you fear bumping up into the much larger weight class in front of you. Don’t worry about getting big from doing cleans, jerks, or military presses with 60k. I think your best bet is not to work out too much while your in season and join a quality gym when you’re out of season. Spend your time on your fighting skills.

Build your time in the weight room around
Overhead Squat
Clean@Jerk
Military Press
Snatch
Pull Ups
Push Ups
Jumping Squats
Single Legged Squats
Step Ups
Dumbbell Lateral Raises (middle and rear deltoid)

I do a lot of body weight excercises already the extra weight training is the icing on top sort of speak.

I do mostly body weight stuff. It works quite well I am very happy with the results thus far.

Quiting and joining another gym is just not an option for me at the moment. Mainly because the gyms in this country even quality ones are pretty lame treadmill places and if there is a quality gym I would have to most likely travel an hour to get to it, not enough hours in the day.

If the only people you can fight outweigh you by 25Kg wouldn’t it make sense to pack muscle on in order to bridge the weight gap?

Am I missing something here?

As far as the limitations of your gym go, have you tried using the welded EZ-Bars as Dumbbells?

Benching with 26Kg in each hand would be far more challenging than a fixed 60Kg bar.

Here is an article with a few ideas that you could implement, given your limitations:

http://www.T-Nation.com/findArticle.do?article=218exer

[quote]jarvis wrote:
If the only people you can fight outweigh you by 25Kg wouldn’t it make sense to pack muscle on in order to bridge the weight gap?
[/quote]

Because even with another 25kg on him he can’t bridge the nearly half a foot height difference. Nevermind the fact that it could take quite a while to put on 25kg of quality weight.

Why not lift weights in a different place than your kickboxing gym?

Sounds like they don’t have what you need (unless as someone suggested doing Olympic lifts), so why not lift elsewhere?

As I said I don’t have the luxury to change gyms. Plus I love the sport to much to just up and quit. Everytime you switch gyms it feels like I am starting over, I worked to hard to start over again.

You should check out a book called “Never Gymless” by Ross Enamait. It would probably suit your needs better than a bodybuilding forum.

I’ll check it the book thanks for the tip…