T Nation

Lifting with High Blood Pressure?


#1

Especially if by genetic factors, how has it affected your weightlifting lifestyle?

Even though I exercise a lot, keep cardio part of my fitness routine, and eat as heathy as I can, my father has high blood pressure and it runs in my family, and when something is hereditary there isn’t much you can do about it.
I’m young in my early 20’s, I know there are younger people with hbp due to the hereditary factor.

If I’m ever unfortunate to get hereditary high blood pressure, will I be able to keep doing what I love the most, fitness (weightlifting and strength traning)? Any of you have high blood pressure due to genetics or do you know of anyone that does? If so, how does it affect your/or their fitness plan, wether it’s weightlifting or strenth training. Are you still able to weightlift while taking medications?
If you take medication, does medication effectively work by keeping your bp normal in moments of strain (such as lifting moderarte to heavy or when you perform exercises a wide variety of exercides?
I read somewhere that weightlifting can be good for hbp in the long run but it can cause pressure spikes,
when you lift, what precautions do you take? What has your doctor told you?
In conclusion, I just want to know if someone diagnosed with hbp (due to genetic factors) will be negatively & drastically affected as to have to change their fitness plans, from calisthenics exercises, and
normal to heavy lifting, all the way to no more calisthenics and
light weight lifting… How would one able to keep getting bigger and stronger with light weights.? That would be a very depressing change.
Sorry, I’m just paranoid, I guess I think and worry too much easily.
Any of your thoughts or actual experience will be greatly appreciated.


#2

Relax, man.

Lifting weights improves high blood pressure. Google it.


#3

Bruh I think that’s a tad optimistic…

Maybe if it’s “moderate” lifting but my only setting is beast mode


#4

Mane don’t go playing the genetics card just yet.

“Genetic factors likely play some role in high blood pressure, heart disease, and other related conditions. However, it is also likely that people with a family history of high blood pressure share common environments and other potential factors that increase their risk.”

You should probably have a chat with your doctor about this either way.

Get measured on a proper sized cuff too because with them 22 inch arms how you gonna get an accurate reading on a small.

Exercise, diet and other lifestyle interventions should be targeted, programmed and progressed towards reducing high blood pressure not just “healthy” stuff. At least before resorting to medications that is.

Specific medications and their side effects can be discussed with your doctor

Maybe chill on the juice if you are on.

Mane you gotta weigh up the pros and cons urself.

If you love lifting and it increases your quality of life that much maybe its worth a few less years of life or a bit more suffering towards the back end.

On the other hand it may seem like that now but in a few decades maybe you’d rather have a few extra years to spend with loved ones.

Maybe you end up somewhere in between, you successfully manage with interventions or luck out and get both gains + long life and die peacefully in your sleep from being old af.

Think about it. Chat with family, friends, doctors, lifting buddies or even people on web forums. Get lots of points of views and experiences.


#5

Lifting is good for blood pressure. But depending on your circumstances, you might hurt yourself more than you help. Talk to your doctor and ask for his/her advice. Most docs are modern enough to encourage exercise, but until you get it under control (and any other issues causing the blood pressure), you might need to limit your exertion. Again, talk to your doc first.

–Me


#6

Try the amino acid l arginine, it relaxes the veins and arteries, for me it lowered my bp so I take less meds and it helps vascularity


#7

I’m 53 with high blood pressure that definitely has a genetic component, and I control with medication. I lift hard 4x/week and I don’t notice that it affects me at all. As long as I am controlling my bp so it is in normal range at rest, I expect that the spikes are also within the normal range.