T Nation

Lifting Tempo

Every strong man (or woman) follows conmon basic tenets. Not to make a list but we know anybody willing to progress should use the big lifts, lift heavy, not go to failure. Some follow them more than others and still get to be pretty strong.
When it comes down to lifting tempo there seems to be a controversy, some advocating slow motion, others explosive lifting, in favor or against grinding etc.

As a personal experience I´ve tried slow motion training but not super slow. The kind of slow that comes from contracting every muscle as hard as possible during my lifts. I´ve experienced great results (fast results if somebody cares) but of course Im curious about faster lifting style.
Some folks advocate the kind of training in whick you should try to explode the bar upwards even if it doesm´t end up moving fast (due to heavy weight).
Which of these styles have worked better for you?

[quote]Salpinx wrote:
Every strong man (or woman) follows conmon basic tenets. Not to make a list but we know anybody willing to progress should use the big lifts, lift heavy, not go to failure. Some follow them more than others and still get to be pretty strong.
When it comes down to lifting tempo there seems to be a controversy, some advocating slow motion, others explosive lifting, in favor or against grinding etc.

As a personal experience I�´ve tried slow motion training but not super slow. The kind of slow that comes from contracting every muscle as hard as possible during my lifts. I�´ve experienced great results (fast results if somebody cares) but of course Im curious about faster lifting style.
Some folks advocate the kind of training in whick you should try to explode the bar upwards even if it doesm�´t end up moving fast (due to heavy weight).
Which of these styles have worked better for you?[/quote]

Go the faster you can, while maintaing maximum tension. /thread

I think it depends what you are training for. Powerlifters for example need momentum to carry through the lift, not all the time granted, but so training as fast as possible with the exception of the pause. As Louie Simmons says, speed work has an basically and up and a down. Both have to be down as fast as possible to develop speed.

Then you have other guys such as brandon lilly who like to control the weight and slow down the Eccentric (I’m not sure if that is the right wording), then explode from the bottom. It is all different. I train as fast as possible no matter the movement.

Even something like hyper extensions I try to move as fast as I can and think about getting to full lock out as possible. This has helped me explode out of the bottom in my squats. This is my take on any sort of fast movements.

we are in a powerlifting forum so i will answer in kind. as fast as possible. you dont extra points for taking longer and lifting slower. the most weight pulled is what wins. so get it up and over with so you have more energy for a higher second and third attempt.

[quote]niksamaras wrote:

[quote]Salpinx wrote:
Every strong man (or woman) follows conmon basic tenets. Not to make a list but we know anybody willing to progress should use the big lifts, lift heavy, not go to failure. Some follow them more than others and still get to be pretty strong.
When it comes down to lifting tempo there seems to be a controversy, some advocating slow motion, others explosive lifting, in favor or against grinding etc.

As a personal experience I�?�´ve tried slow motion training but not super slow. The kind of slow that comes from contracting every muscle as hard as possible during my lifts. I�?�´ve experienced great results (fast results if somebody cares) but of course Im curious about faster lifting style.
Some folks advocate the kind of training in whick you should try to explode the bar upwards even if it doesm�?�´t end up moving fast (due to heavy weight).
Which of these styles have worked better for you?[/quote]

Go the faster you can, while maintaing maximum tension. /thread
[/quote]
I agree. Fast lift and max tension are reserved to the elite and I guess thats what makes them good. I mean it is a skill by itself exploding the weight while keeping max tension (the force velocity curve simply says the higher the speed, the lower the tension or force)

the great John Black

"lift your light weights as if they are heavy and your heavy weights as if they are light "

While you should be lifting as explosive as possible, I think it’s also important to note that it shouldn’t come at the cost of maintaining tightness