T Nation

Lifting and Stunted Growth


#1

Is it possible that I could have stunted my growth with heavy squats and deads throughout my mid-teen (13-18) years? I know that this is generally a myth, but still most trainers wouldn't recommend heavy squats and deads for developing teens.

I did however do these movements very heavily (and stupidly), and now I'm 18, 2 inches shorter than my father and 4 inches taller than my older brother. Could heavy squats and deads throughout my developing years have stunted my growth?


#2

No, lifting promotes growth. I actually wish I could get shorter. Being tall sucks. Leverage sucks, shitty strength:bodyweight ratio, and you always get called on for meaningless stereotypical jokes.

5'8-5'11 make the best athletes in my opinion.


#3

If you are 4" taller than your older brother what makes you think that heavy weights stunted your growth?

How tall is your Mothers father (your grandfather)?


#4

Sorry typo, I'm 4 inches shorter than my older brother.


#5

my mother's father is 6'0, and father's father was 6'3. I'm 5'8.


#6

I guess the grass is always greener on the other side. I'm 5'8". I wish I were taller.

Footsoldier - Genetics is like a big game of Texas Hold 'Em - you get the hand you're dealt and that's that. Your brother may just be a fluke. There are several online calculators that allow you to predict height based on your mother's and father's heights, plus or minus 2" or so. They are fairly accurate.


#7

Here is a calculator:

http://www.kidsgrowth.com/hc/height.cfm


#8

r u anoyed at being 5ft8 im 5ft8 and i wud hate to be any taller or shorter.


#9

Bein 6' would have been nice, I'm 5'10... 3" taller then my father and 1" taller than my younger brother who didn't lift through his teens. I started lifting at 15 because I was a rail and kept getting beat up in my first year of high school.


#10

I seen a study from the Soviets. The found that resistance training actually enhanced height.

As I recall from memory, boys that lifted weight from ages about 12 to 18 on average were a little over an inch talled that those that did not. I seem to recall this was reviewed on a very large popoulation. It makes sence biologically. When people lift weights they usually gain muscle.

Tennis players have been shown to have more bone mass in their dominant arm. If one hasn't finished their growing in height it seems logical that the body would adapt in taller height in addition to the muscle gains.


#11

I hope it doesn't stunt growth because I have been doing heavy squats since I was 13.


#12

It's nearly impossible to voluntarily create enough force on ephysial plates to damage them. It takes traumatic injury, like being bludgeoned with a baseball bat or run over by a car.

Unless you were a 6x bodyweight squatter at that age, you're fine.

-Dan


#13

I lifted like a fool from ages 13 to about 16.

And I'm 5'5". So I guess it's right. If I didn't lift, I would be tall. But wait. I was 12 and did the same thing everyday.

And it was all based on isolation moves. No leg work. No squats. No deads. Just moves I got from movies. So I guess it's the fact my Dad 5'5" and my Mom is 5'2". My sisters are 5'8" and 5'1.

Lift and let your kids lift. I don't think kids should go for double body weight, but let the kid lift stuff. It won't hurt.


#14

Man don't believe that crap, it's genetics. I'm 5'4" and 195lbs, and have a 29 " waist. I have 5 brothers and we all work out pretty religously, here's the kicker, they are all taller than me by about 4" but I can out lift them in just about every exercise. Weight lifting doesn't stunt your growth, it just makes little people like me train harder and show gains faster.


#15

bad nutrition limits growth, not exercise


#16

if weightlifting stunted growth running would stunt it even more because there can be up to 5x bodyweight stressed on the joints via running.

my mate started when he was 13 now he is 16. with 16 inch arms at 185cm, 6ft1.