Life After University...

[quote]SpartanX wrote:
wish I kinda did the whole experience, but I graduated highschool, been graduated for over a year now…I’m 19 but I don’t have regerts. I’m not goin to anymore schooling, it’s not my thing really i have many other ambitions to pursue, I kinda have a life but many responsibilites.
Have fun being poor homes.
Ur nothing without education, I don’t care what ‘angle,’ you hit it at.[/quote]

True. But university educations are not the epitomy of excellence. The greatest education you will receive is from people in your chosen field mentoring you from experience. Not some retard college professor teaching you how to regurgitate redundant spoonfed information. There is no free thought in these places. Just a system designed to groom your conformity.

If uni are the best years of your life, you suck at life.

[quote]stockzy wrote:
SpartanX wrote:
wish I kinda did the whole experience, but I graduated highschool, been graduated for over a year now…I’m 19 but I don’t have regerts. I’m not goin to anymore schooling, it’s not my thing really i have many other ambitions to pursue, I kinda have a life but many responsibilites.
Have fun being poor homes.
Ur nothing without education, I don’t care what ‘angle,’ you hit it at.

True. But university educations are not the epitomy of excellence. The greatest education you will receive is from people in your chosen field mentoring you from experience. Not some retard college professor teaching you how to regurgitate redundant spoonfed information. There is no free thought in these places. Just a system designed to groom your conformity.

If uni are the best years of your life, you suck at life.[/quote]

Looks like someone had a shitty college experience.

[quote]stockzy wrote:
Not some retard college professor teaching you how to regurgitate redundant spoonfed information. There is no free thought in these places. Just a system designed to groom your conformity.
[/quote]

Spoon fed information? Sure, that’s why I spend countless amount of hours (AND money) on research to do most of my assignments.

At this level there are a lot of times where you either have to buy a book because the library doesn’t cater for, buy papers online or perform practical experiments and come to conclusions most often then not. Of course when I can actually download a book, or find one in the library I sure do that!

[quote]Bicep_craze wrote:
stockzy wrote:
Not some retard college professor teaching you how to regurgitate redundant spoonfed information. There is no free thought in these places. Just a system designed to groom your conformity.

Spoon fed information? Sure, that’s why I spend countless amount of hours (AND money) on research to do most of my assignments.

At this level there are a lot of times where you either have to buy a book because the library doesn’t cater for, buy papers online or perform practical experiments and come to conclusions most often then not. Of course when I can actually download a book, or find one in the library I sure do that![/quote]

You’ll see what he means when you actually get that job after graduation. You learn more from experience than assignments anyday. I work in the space science and engineering field, and everything is built upon something else. You will rarely design your own project from the ground up.

Even if you do happen to design a perfect product, it’ll be changed by someone else and you won’t get the credit for it. Alot of times very little ‘engineering’ is actually required. Not trying to be negative…Just lettin you know how it works at this institution.

Definitely true. I enjoyed my years at university, and the later years are much more fun than the first. But I grew kinda tired of the research which sole purpose seemed to be to challenge and undermine previous research for it’s own expense.

With time it seemed that research lost sight on it’s possible implications into the real world.

Learning from experience still beats all other forms of learning (given that you have some adequate background, that is).

You will never again be able to have all of your friends together in one place. After school everyone moves and you only see your buddies a few times a year, and that’s if everyone is making an effort to stay in touch.

[quote]Steel Nation wrote:
You will never again be able to have all of your friends together in one place. After school everyone moves and you only see your buddies a few times a year, and that’s if everyone is making an effort to stay in touch.[/quote]

That’s why I didn’t bother making college friends. Then again, I commuted.

[quote]Otep wrote:
God I hope not.[/quote]

X2. It’s been pretty shitty so far. Of course, I’m pretty sure I’m doing it wrong, so my opinion doesn’t apply for most people.

[quote]Paste42 wrote:
Bicep_craze wrote:
stockzy wrote:
Not some retard college professor teaching you how to regurgitate redundant spoonfed information. There is no free thought in these places. Just a system designed to groom your conformity.

Spoon fed information? Sure, that’s why I spend countless amount of hours (AND money) on research to do most of my assignments.

At this level there are a lot of times where you either have to buy a book because the library doesn’t cater for, buy papers online or perform practical experiments and come to conclusions most often then not. Of course when I can actually download a book, or find one in the library I sure do that!

You’ll see what he means when you actually get that job after graduation. You learn more from experience than assignments anyday. I work in the space science and engineering field, and everything is built upon something else. You will rarely design your own project from the ground up.

Even if you do happen to design a perfect product, it’ll be changed by someone else and you won’t get the credit for it. Alot of times very little ‘engineering’ is actually required. Not trying to be negative…Just lettin you know how it works at this institution.
[/quote]

Unfortunately I know it’s true, in my previous post I just corrected the guy when saying that ‘spoonfed’ part.

Chances are 99% of what I’m learning is useless when on-the-job. I have a polytechnic background and what I can say about this issue is by relating what I learned at school (primarily electronics) vs my sponsor at work (which was 90% mechanical, 10% electrical related job).

Basically 99% of the fault finding (worked as a technician) I encountered during my apprenticeship had absolutely NOTHING to do with what I learned at the polytechnic institute.

[quote]Otep wrote:
God I hope not.[/quote]

Amen.
I’m in my third year, but I’ve been ready to move on for a while. It gets old quick… And it’s eerily familiar to high school, only with less responsibility.

[quote]therajraj wrote:
is university really the best four years of your life?[/quote]

Yes and no.

College really isn’t that great. But if you’re one of the recent grads lucky enough to not find a job in their field, writing essays and having your parents pay for everything is a hell of a lot better than paying the bills with a shitty job you could have gotten straight out of high school.

I’m graduating in April from the University of Guelph (its in Ontario)… Personally I had a lot of fun in university. Just feels weird knowing I won’t be doing school full-time anymore.

At the same time I understand people on this forum saying they disliked their college days and it getting old. Don’t want to get drunk at every opportunity anymore now that it interferes with my bodybuilding goals. Hate studying until 3am sometimes on Saturday nights etc… Glad to hear life became more enjoyable after graduation for some.

Hard to have fun at Community College…

[quote]Bicep_craze wrote:
Paste42 wrote:
Bicep_craze wrote:
stockzy wrote:
Not some retard college professor teaching you how to regurgitate redundant spoonfed information. There is no free thought in these places. Just a system designed to groom your conformity.

Spoon fed information? Sure, that’s why I spend countless amount of hours (AND money) on research to do most of my assignments.

At this level there are a lot of times where you either have to buy a book because the library doesn’t cater for, buy papers online or perform practical experiments and come to conclusions most often then not. Of course when I can actually download a book, or find one in the library I sure do that!

You’ll see what he means when you actually get that job after graduation. You learn more from experience than assignments anyday. I work in the space science and engineering field, and everything is built upon something else. You will rarely design your own project from the ground up.

Even if you do happen to design a perfect product, it’ll be changed by someone else and you won’t get the credit for it. Alot of times very little ‘engineering’ is actually required. Not trying to be negative…Just lettin you know how it works at this institution.

Unfortunately I know it’s true, in my previous post I just corrected the guy when saying that ‘spoonfed’ part.

Chances are 99% of what I’m learning is useless when on-the-job. I have a polytechnic background and what I can say about this issue is by relating what I learned at school (primarily electronics) vs my sponsor at work (which was 90% mechanical, 10% electrical related job).

Basically 99% of the fault finding (worked as a technician) I encountered during my apprenticeship had absolutely NOTHING to do with what I learned at the polytechnic institute. [/quote]

I can’t remember where I heard it but I recall someone saying all a degree does is tell an employer you have the ability to learn. This seemed to hold true because once you get into the higher level positions things become quite specialized and all your education really doesn’t mean a whole lot, they just want to know that you have the ability to learn what is needed in order to do your job well, they don’t necessarily care if you can find the eigenvectors of an nth dimensional matrix and shit, unless you’re going into quantum computing or something but that’s a different story lol.

[quote]JLu wrote:
Bicep_craze wrote:
Paste42 wrote:
Bicep_craze wrote:
stockzy wrote:

I can’t remember where I heard it but I recall someone saying all a degree does is tell an employer you have the ability to learn. This seemed to hold true because once you get into the higher level positions things become quite specialized and all your education really doesn’t mean a whole lot, they just want to know that you have the ability to learn what is needed in order to do your job well, they don’t necessarily care if you can find the eigenvectors of an nth dimensional matrix and shit, unless you’re going into quantum computing or something but that’s a different story lol.
[/quote]

X2. Exactly. Most of the time once you are hired for that higher level position, you end up being trained anyways. The employers want to make sure that you are doing your job to their standards, not taking the chance of leaving it up to what you were taught in school.

I used to think, why go for a bachelor’s degree when an associate’s degree would suffice? It wasn’t until after college and getting into my career that I realized I could have been just as successful without ANY college.

Almost all the useful applicable knowledge associated with my career I learned while on the job. The only great thing about college was getting me out of the house, and meeting my future wife.

But that’s just me.

[quote]therajraj wrote:
I’m graduating in April from the University of Guelph (its in Ontario)… Personally I had a lot of fun in university. Just feels weird knowing I won’t be doing school full-time anymore.

At the same time I understand people on this forum saying they disliked their college days and it getting old. Don’t want to get drunk at every opportunity anymore now that it interferes with my bodybuilding goals. Hate studying until 3am sometimes on Saturday nights etc… Glad to hear life became more enjoyable after graduation for some.[/quote]

I think you would be better off trying to find what is best about whatever situation you are in. I liked college. It was a time for me to learn all of the shit I hadn’t figured out yet as far as relating to others and some experiences. If you have a decent plan as far as what you plan to do later, then the time after you finish school is great as well.

I’m not broke anymore. Nothing beats being able to go to the grocery store and get what I actually need without worrying about if I’ll have to go without two weeks later.

As far as other comments about college not relating to your actual job, I would suppose that is true if you only finish your education with an undergrad degree. I have heard most basic college degrees mean as much in society today as high school diplomas meant 30 years ago.

In other words, if your goal is to live comfortably on some level without literally living paycheck to paycheck, you may want to accept that more schooling is in order beyond that and a more specific career goal is needed.

[quote]SpartanX wrote:
Have fun being poor homes.
Ur nothing without education, I don’t care what ‘angle,’ you hit it at.[/quote]

That is only partially true, education is important, but, lets be honest… After working in industry, and my PhD, undergrad is no where near nessecary to be successful. The undergraduate program at most universities is sooo sub par that with the exception of a few programs and teaching you to work in a group it is nothing you can not learn from joining the army, being self motivated, or attending a trade school…

I am not saying its worthless, just that an undergrad degree is hardly a be all end all… and this is coming from someone whos goal is to be a college professor…

Oh, and yes, undergrad was the bomb, but my masters was even less work and I wasnt broke all the time. Job was even less work then my masters and a crap load more money. so, no, undergrad is not the best years of your life, every new day is the best !

-ratchet

[quote]Professor X wrote:
As far as other comments about college not relating to your actual job, I would suppose that is true if you only finish your education with an undergrad degree. I have heard most basic college degrees mean as much in society today as high school diplomas meant 30 years ago.

In other words, if your goal is to live comfortably on some level without literally living paycheck to paycheck, you may want to accept that more schooling is in order beyond that and a more specific career goal is needed.[/quote]

x2 but that also is very field dependant. My sister for example did immunology and with a masters barely makes 40k… My friend who got a BS in metallurgical makes 65k and a friend who got a bs in petroleum makes 85k but accepts living on an oil rig at sea or in the arctic circle.

I’m in my fourth year of college now, I did’t start until I was 26, I will be 31 when I graduate. Yeah, I’m doinig one of those 5 year degrees. Actually, it’s 4 years and one semester.

I wish I had done this much sooner, I would be in the same age category as most of the students here. It would probably make thing a little less awkward.

Needless to say, I don’t do any of the typical college kid stuff like binge drinking, dorm parties, frat binders, etc…

My first 4-5 semesters I just hated because all the crap I was “learning” I already knew, or I knew was 100% bullshit. Plus having to write essays and research papers was a major pain in the ass because I absolutely hate writing.

But looking back, those semesters were a lot easier. Sometimes I will take a class that I fall in love with, and sometimes I will take a class that makes me want to shoot myself. Like all these retarded “required” classes.

Anyway, college, for me, isn’t really all that much fun. It’s actually kind of a pain in the ass sometimes. I would much rather be working a regular job in my area of study, than actually studying. Plus, I don’t have any college friends, I’m a total loner here.