T Nation

Left Pec Bigger Than the Right One


#1

Hey, i saw your one hand dumbbell press thing and actually i wanted to ask whether i should do more left (single)hand dumbbell bench press more or right (single)hand dumbbell bench press more ? Actually my left pec seems bigger than the right one and i actually am confused that if i do right hand dumbbell press, then my left chest will grow or my right ? i want to even it out and im a right handed but dont know why is my right pec lower than my weaker side :frowning: please give me a solution .


#2

K YES! I wanted to start a thread about something similar, but I’ll just add on to this one if OP you don’t mind?

My left lat is way bigger than my right one and my left tricep is probably twice the size of my right.

What is the best way to go about achieving a certain level of symmetry?
Focus a lot of single arm stuff with a few extra reps on the smaller side? IS that what most people do in these types of situations and does it actually help?


#3

Yes same problem here. My right arm can do about 30% more reps than left, and is also about 1/2 - 3/4 inch bigger. Also, my left lat is larger and stronger than my right lat. I think this is because on lat pulldowns and such, my right arm (the stronger one) is doing more work than my right lat (the weaker one) and vice versa for my left side.


#4

dropping all bilateral stuff will help a little but for the most part shit like this is just genetic


#5

NOoooooooooooo I refuse to accept that!!

CT fletcher says you have control of your mind, you have control of your muscle. You have to say I command you to Grow!!

I am going to start saying that to my tiny lat and see what happens.
He says if it doesn’t grow after you’ve told it to grow it means you didn’t say it with conviction, so ill try saying it and then I’ll try saying it with more conviction.

GOOD LUCK TO ALL


#6

[quote]Spock81 wrote:
NOoooooooooooo I refuse to accept that!!

CT fletcher says you have control of your mind, you have control of your muscle. You have to say I command you to Grow!!

I am going to start saying that to my tiny lat and see what happens.
He says if it doesn’t grow after you’ve told it to grow it means you didn’t say it with conviction, so ill try saying it and then I’ll try saying it with more conviction.

GOOD LUCK TO ALL [/quote]

Haha x2!!!

My arms/lats are still pretty small so I don’t think it is a huge worry at the moment… I’m pretty sure my arm imbalance was caused by doing 4 years of tennis…
One thing I am doing at the moment that seems to be working a little is squeezing as hard as I can at the top of reps e.g. bicep curls, but contracting the weaker side a little harder than strong side. I tend to end up with more DOMS in weaker side so thats a good sign I guess :slight_smile:
Also, when doing unilateral exercises e.g. db curls, I always do the same amount of reps with both side, even though my stronger side could do more easily.


#7

Life is all about trade offs.

Simply stand at an angle to people, so that your smaller side is closer to them than your larger side. This will make you smaller but more symmetrical.

More seriously, if you’re not in a show, no one is going to notice. Throw an extra set on the smaller side if you must (ie. Start and end on the same size)


#8

I have had imbalances in my quads, erectors and lats for a long time and it took awhile to get a more symmetrical level of soreness. It’s never going to be perfect but I don’t think there should be a huge difference. What I learned was to take into consideration other muscle groups and not just the ones that are noticeable.

One example was my left front delt always being the point of failure when benching. It was because my lower/mid traps and teres major on my left side was significantly weaker. After doing a lot of pullups and barbell rows, I could finally see my left teres major come into existence and it’s getting easier to keep the left shoulder stable. So in short, doing isolation work can help to bring up the weaker side but you also have to make sure other muscles are doing their job to keep that muscle stable to ensure it does work in a heavy compound movement. This requires balance in pushing and pulling movements.

Another thing to keep in mind is more work (isolation or compound) may not necessarily help. You have to develop the mind-muscle connection and make that muscle work regardless of what exercise you do.


#9

[quote]Yogi wrote:
dropping all bilateral stuff will help a little but for the most part shit like this is just genetic[/quote]

Wrong answer.

Muscle shape can be slightly different from one side to another (Arnold’s biceps, for example).

However, unless there’s congenital issues or the individual suffered major trauma, I see no reason why an intelligent and motivated lifter cannot get both sides close in size.


#10

[quote]Spock81 wrote:
NOoooooooooooo I refuse to accept that!!
[/quote]

Right fucking answer.

There’s multiple factors at play here.

Have you had prior injury which made you favor one side?

Are there muscular imbalances, as mentioned by lift206, with stabilizers and the less glamorous muscles very few people care about (even though they should)?

Do you have good MMC in the weaker/smaller muscle group?

Are there trigger points effecting proper mobility? I read in another thread about how you recently got a massage and felt much better afterwards. Adhesions in the fascia can inhibit proper scapular movement. This, in turn, alters how your muscles respond to a given task. Inevitably, one side becomes dominant and more neurally efficient. This, obviously, results in a visual disparity.

And it’s not enough to just toss in some extra unilateral work as an after thought. It’s fine to do some activation work on the weaker side on your off days or before your main lifting session; but you do need to prioritize them. You need to attack those issues pissed off and ready for war.


#11

[quote]MinotaurXXX wrote:

[quote]Yogi wrote:
dropping all bilateral stuff will help a little but for the most part shit like this is just genetic[/quote]

Wrong answer.

Muscle shape can be slightly different from one side to another (Arnold’s biceps, for example).

However, unless there’s congenital issues or the individual suffered major trauma, I see no reason why an intelligent and motivated lifter cannot get both sides close in size. [/quote]

disagree with you there, cowboy

EDIT: although if anyone has before/afters where they’ve corrected something like this I’ll happily eat my shoe Werner Herzog style. I’ve never seen it, though


#12

[quote]Yogi wrote:

[quote]MinotaurXXX wrote:

[quote]Yogi wrote:
dropping all bilateral stuff will help a little but for the most part shit like this is just genetic[/quote]

Wrong answer.

Muscle shape can be slightly different from one side to another (Arnold’s biceps, for example).

However, unless there’s congenital issues or the individual suffered major trauma, I see no reason why an intelligent and motivated lifter cannot get both sides close in size. [/quote]

disagree with you there, cowboy

EDIT: although if anyone has before/afters where they’ve corrected something like this I’ll happily eat my shoe Werner Herzog style. I’ve never seen it, though[/quote]

You can disagree all you want and whether or not you’ve never seen means nothing to me.

If there is no birth defect or severe past injury, the size (not the shape) differential from one side to another can be addressed with the right mindset and training.


#13

[quote]MinotaurXXX wrote:

[quote]Spock81 wrote:
NOoooooooooooo I refuse to accept that!!
[/quote]

Right fucking answer.

There’s multiple factors at play here.

Have you had prior injury which made you favor one side?

Are there muscular imbalances, as mentioned by lift206, with stabilizers and the less glamorous muscles very few people care about (even though they should)?

Do you have good MMC in the weaker/smaller muscle group?

Are there trigger points effecting proper mobility? I read in another thread about how you recently got a massage and felt much better afterwards. Adhesions in the fascia can inhibit proper scapular movement. This, in turn, alters how your muscles respond to a given task. Inevitably, one side becomes dominant and more neurally efficient. This, obviously, results in a visual disparity.

And it’s not enough to just toss in some extra unilateral work as an after thought. It’s fine to do some activation work on the weaker side on your off days or before your main lifting session; but you do need to prioritize them. You need to attack those issues pissed off and ready for war.

[/quote]

I’ve never had any injuries on that one side, but I think the trigger points were a major issue.
I went back for another massage and she found a bunch of them in my tiny tricep, and she said those ones might have been preventing my tiny lat from activating properly :O.
IT’SALL CONNECTED, and I had no idea!!

She gave me some good advice and stretches and whatnot so hopefully all of that + waging war will help things even out!


#14

[quote]Yogi wrote:

EDIT: although if anyone has before/afters where they’ve corrected something like this I’ll happily eat my shoe Werner Herzog style. I’ve never seen it, though[/quote]

Challenge accepted !!!


#15

[quote]Spock81 wrote:

[quote]Yogi wrote:

EDIT: although if anyone has before/afters where they’ve corrected something like this I’ll happily eat my shoe Werner Herzog style. I’ve never seen it, though[/quote]

Challenge accepted !!! [/quote]

Bring it! I’ll start marinating a shoe